The Hidden Homelessness Crisis In California (HBO)

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How to survive in Los Angeles - without a home? | DW Documentary

California's economy is booming. Yet, there are tens of thousands of people living on the streets and not benefitting at all. There are as many homeless people in Greater Los Angeles as in the whole of Germany. Michael J. Diehl is one of them. The Texan-born Michael J. Diehl, aka MJ, has lived in a tent in California for four years. Instead of an apartment, he has a guitar and a dog. He used to be a deep sea diver in the Gulf of Mexico, working on oil rigs and pipelines and earning thousands of dollars. Then he was shot in the head. The bullet is still there today. As a consequence, he lost his health, his work, his family and his home. Now, years later, he has created another family and home for himself on the banks of the Santa Ana River. But the local authorities are threatening to move them on. MJ and many others are ready to put up a fight. _______ Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more information visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954

High rents force some in Silicon Valley to live in vehicles

Faced with some of the most expensive rental housing in the nation, some Bay Area residents are feeling priced out and are seeking low-cost alternatives. In Silicon Valley, a hub of computer and technology companies, some people are even turning to cars, vans and RVs for housing. NewsHour Weekend Special Correspondent Joanne Elgart Jennings has the story.

When Homelessness Reaches Middle-Class Working Families | Megyn Kelly TODAY

Even amid a surging stock market and low unemployment, homelessness is surging along with income disparity, affecting regular working families in such places as Los Angeles. NBC’s Jacob Soboroff visits working families living in RVs in California and joins Megyn Kelly TODAY live to comment. » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY Follow TODAY on Google+: http://on.today.com/PlusTODAY Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY When Homelessness Reaches Middle-Class Working Families | Megyn Kelly TODAY

The Worst Fish in America: Asian Carpocalypse

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News VICE News correspondent Thomas Morton investigates Asian carp — a slimy, ugly, and often gargantuan species of fish that has taken over many waterways in the United States. First introduced in the US in the 1960s to control weeds and parasites at aquatic farms in Arkansas, the bottom feeders eventually escaped and made their way through the Mississippi River system, eating almost everything in their path and severely damaging ecosystems across the Midwest. Today, government officials are concerned that the fish will invade the Great Lakes, destroy more ecosystems, wreak havoc on the region's multibillion dollar fishing industry, and spread to almost every major waterway in the Northeast. VICE News traveled across Illinois to see how people are dealing with the Asian carp invasion, visiting the Redneck Fishing Tournament — where the sole mission is to catch as many carp as possible — touring a processing plant trying to monetize the fish, and then heading to Chicago, where we learned that Asian carp are a symptom of a much larger issue. Watch: "The Sloths That Could Cure Cancer" - http://bit.ly/1rngNf9 Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews

What It Costs To Live In San Francisco | Making It

Perennially perched at or near the top of lists of America’s most expensive and affluent cities, San Francisco is increasingly out of reach for people who would be card-carrying members of the American middle class elsewhere. VICE Money spent a day with a state university professor to see how her family of four deals with the city’s high cost of living. Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo

There is a shortage of affordable housing in every state in the country, but it's especially bad in California — where there's only one affordable housing unit for every five extremely low income households.

The gap is not only pushing more and more people out onto the streets—it's also creating a new, fast-growing, and hidden class of homelessness: People who in the past would have been able to afford a room or apartment but now live in their cars by necessity.

Danielle Williams is one of them. She’s a single working mother who has been living in her van with her daughter for five years. At first, it meant sleeping in dark, scarcely populated areas, and being hassled by the police. But thanks to a program called Safe Parking — a network of parking lots equipped with porta-potties and lot monitors — she can now stay in her car overnight without worrying about her safety.

VICE News traveled to California to see how the new program is helping people like Danielle live a little more comfortably, and met with a government official who’s frustrated there aren’t longer term solutions to help the roughly 16,000 people in Los Angeles who now sleep in their cars.

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