Albrecht Altdorfer (1480-1538) - A collection of paintings & drawings 2K Ultra HD Silent Slideshow

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1/4 The Lost Portrait of Bonnie Prince Charlie: A Culture Show Special

Playlist : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhUwLReQrlc&list=PLM4S2hGZDSE7GzEU_1dN_ZRShuV5012bB&index=1 First broadcast: Feb 2014. In 2009, art detective Dr Bendor Grosvenor caused a national scandal by proving that the Scottish National Portrait Gallery's iconic portrait of Bonnie Prince Charlie, the rebel Stuart who almost seized power in 1745, was not in fact him. Keen to make amends, and suspecting that a long-lost portrait of the prince by one of Scotland's greatest artists, Allan Ramsay, might still survive, Bendor decides to retrace Charles' journey in the hope of unravelling one of the greatest mysteries in British art.

Paul Klein on How to Succeed as an Artist

This is a talk I gave for Tandem Press' 25th Anniversary at the Chazen Museum in Madison, Wisconsin. For additional information please visit http://kleinartistworks.com/. If you have a question, please email me at paul@kleinartistworks.com. Thank you.

"The Secret of Drawing" Episode 1: "The Line of Enquiry" 2005

This four part series, presented by Andrew Graham-Dixon, explores how drawing has shaped our lives. Join him to discover the history of drawing and its relevance to the modern world.

Alexander Roslin (1718-1793) A collection of paintings 4K Ultra HD

Alexander Roslin Alexandre in French; 15 July 1718 – 5 July 1793) was a Swedish portrait painter who worked in Scania, Bayreuth, Paris, Italy, Warsaw and St. Petersburg, primarily for members of aristocratic families. After showing an unusual talent for drawing and painting, he trained in drawing at Karlskrona under Admiralty Captain Lars Ehrenbill (1697–1747) in order to become a naval draughtsman, and then began to paint miniatures. Stockholm had become an intellectual and artistic center since Queen Christina had established connections with Paris, and Alexander Roslin moved there. At the age of sixteen he became apprenticed to the court painter Georg Engelhard Schröder in Stockholm, studying painting there until 1741 and beginning to paint large portraits in oils. Schröder was influenced by Hyacinthe Rigaud and Nicolas de Largillière. In 1741, Roslin settled in Gothenburg, and the following year moved to Scania, where he remained until 1745 painting portraits and also creating religious paintings for the church at Hasslöv. In 1745, Roslin left Sweden for Bayreuth, where he had been invited to work for Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Kulmbach. In 1747, he moved to Italy to study the works of the great masters. While in Italy he portrayed, among others, the family of Philip, Duke of Parma in 1752. In the same year Roslin moved to Paris, at the age of 34, where he settled for the rest of his life. Here, in 1759, he married the pastel painter Marie-Suzanne Giroust. The couple had three sons and three daughters. In 1768 Roslin painted her dressed in Bolognese fashion, Lady with Veil, a portrait that the art critic, writer and philosopher Denis Diderot judged "très piquante". In 1767 he painted a double portrait of them both; she is depicted working in pastels on a portrait of Henrik Wilhelm Peill, while Roslin points at a gold box he received from Peill as a present. The frame of the painting is inscribed Loin et près (Far away and yet close), showing that the portrait was a token of friendship. This painting was purchased by the Swedish National Museum in 2013. In Paris he was a protégé of François Boucher and his work rapidly became fashionable. He was chosen as a member of the French Art Academy, to which his wife also belonged. His early portraits are painted in bright, cool colours, and show the influence of Jean-Marc Nattier and Hyacinthe Rigaud. Around the 1760s he started using daring colouring in his paintings, such as in the portrait of his wife, Lady with Veil (1768), and the Jennings Family (1769). Roslin had great technical skill in painting the surfaces and texture of precious materials such as fabrics and jewels, but was also adept at capturing his sitters at their best. In Paris he soon became one of the foremost portraitists of his time, valued mostly for practiced rendering of luxurious fabrics and gentle complexions: "Satin, skin? Go to Roslin." His portraits of members of the French aristocracy show sensitivity and taste and also psychological insight, although changes in taste might make his faces seem "stiff and lifeless" to some observers today. In 1765 he scored a significant triumph when his portrait of Louis, Duke of La Rochefoucauld and his family, painted in competition with Jean-Baptiste Greuze, was awarded the prize. He also painted several portraits of members of the French royal family and foreign princes, including the Swedish king Gustav III and his brothers. In the second half of the 18th century, having one's portrait painted by Roslin was the highpoint of public esteem. In 1771 Roslin, although a foreigner (often called Roslin le suédois, "Roslin the Swede"), was awarded a pension and a free apartment in the Louvre. The following year he was awarded the Royal Order of Vasa by his native country, after which he was also called Roslin le Chevalier ("Roslin the knight"). He was often surrounded by Swedish visitors to Paris, such as Peill. He was also a good friend of the influential Swedish politician Count Carl Gustaf Tessin. After his wife's death, during the years 1774–75, Roslin visited Sweden, where he had been elected a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Arts, oddly enough as a foreign honorary member. During the visit, he painted the members of the Swedish royal family, his self-portrait while painting the king, and also portraits of the statesman Carl Fredrik Scheffer and the naturalist Carl Linnaeus. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Roslin Thank you, please subscribe for future videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gMk3w9hw8BbtqoUpEMKeg?sub_confirmation=1

How To Draw Fabric Folds: Drawing based on Leonardo da Vinci

Draw fabric folds, based on a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci. SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/circlelineartschool for a new art video each week. Watch Next: How to Draw like Leonardo da Vinci: Head of a Warrior: https://youtu.be/DCRveDlxbrs Next up: How to Draw a Face: Playlist: http://bit.ly/1bevT1d Learn a simple way to draw fabric folds with a pencil in this step by step narrated drawing based on a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci. How to Draw Fabric after a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci Tom McPherson Circle Line Art School Leonardo da Vinci was born in 1452 in Vinci in Italy and loved to draw. He kept notebooks which are full of his thoughts and observations in words and sketches. Leonardo is famous for painting the Mona Lisa, perhaps the most famous painting in the world. It is now in The Louvre in Paris. There are only around fifteen of his paintings that have survived, but there are many of his notebooks and drawings. He drew whatever he was interested in and drawing was a way for him to understand what he was seeing. Sometimes his drawings are preparatory studies for parts of paintings. The Drawing in this art video is from 'Drapery Study for a Seated Figure" by Leonardo da Vinci, ca. 1470-75. It is now in The Louvre, Paris. The materials da Vinci used were a brush and gray tempera highlighted with white on a gray prepared linen canvas. The size of the original is 26.5 x 25.3 cm. In this drawing you can see Leonardo da Vinci's obsession with how light falls on fabric. The cloth he drew from would have been made wet and then placed on a clay sculpture or mannequin and allowed to dry. Leonardo da Vinci thought that all artists should keep a notebook or sketchbook to record what they see and notice before they forgot it. Leonardo da Vinci died in 1519 in Amboise in France. Links: Circle Line Art School: http://www.circlelineartschool.com The Louvre: http://www.louvre.fr/en

Albrecht Altdorfer (1480-1538) - A collection of paintings and drawings in 2K HD. Silent slideshow.

A German painter, engraver and architect of the Renaissance working in Regensburg. Along with Lucas Cranach the Elder and Wolf Huber he is regarded to be the main representative of the so-called Danube School setting biblical and historical subjects against landscape backgrounds of expressive colours. As an artist also making small intricate engravings he is seen to belong to the Nuremberg Little Masters.

Altdorfer was the pioneer painter of pure landscape, making them the subject of the painting, as well as compositions dominated by their landscape; these comprise much of his oeuvre. He believed that the human figure should not disrupt nature, but rather participate in it or imitate its natural processes. Taking and developing the landscape style of Lucas Cranach the Elder, he shows the hilly landscape of the Danube valley with thick forests of drooping and crumbling firs and larches hung with moss, and often dramatic colouring from a rising or setting sun.

His Landscape with Footbridge (National Gallery, London) of 1518–1520 is claimed to be the first pure landscape in oil. In this painting, Altdorfer places a large tree that is cut off by the margins at the center of the landscape, making it the central axis and focus within the piece. He uses anthropomorphism to give the tree human qualities such as the drapery of its limbs.

He also made many fine finished drawings, mostly landscapes, in pen and watercolour such as the Landscape with the Woodcutter in 1522. The drawing opens at ground level on a clearing surrounding an enormous tree that is placed in the center, dominating the picture. It poses and gesticulates as if it was human, splaying its branches out in every corner. Halfway up the tree trunk, hangs a gabled shrine. At the time, a shrine like this might shelter an image of the Crucifixion or the Virgin Mary, but since it is turned away from the viewer, we are not sure what it truly is. At the bottom of the tree, a tiny figure of a seated man, crossed legged, holds a knife and axe, declaring his status in society/occupation

Altdorfer often distorts perspective to subtle effect. His donor figures are often painted completely out of scale with the main scene, as in paintings of the previous centuries. He also painted some portraits; overall his painted oeuvre was not large. In his later works, Altdorfer moved more towards mannerism and began to depict the human form to the conformity of the Italian model, as well as dominate the picture with frank colors.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albrecht_Altdorfer

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