Albrecht Altdorfer (1480-1538) - A collection of paintings & drawings 2K Ultra HD Silent Slideshow

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Caravaggio: His life and style in three paintings | National Gallery

Curator of Later Italian, Spanish, and French 17th-century Paintings, Letizia Treves, guides you through the tumultuous life of Caravaggio. She looks at how his innovative style developed from a focus on nature and expression in his early works to the sophistication of his mature works. Would you like to attend our Lunchtime Talks? Take a look at our program: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/lunchtime-talks Follow us on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/NationalGallery Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thenationalgallery/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/national_gallery/ Help keep the museum accessible for everyone by supporting us here: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/support-us The National Gallery houses the national collection of paintings in the Western European tradition from the 13th to the 19th centuries. The museum is free of charge and open 361 days per year, daily between 10.00 am - 6.00 pm and on Fridays between 10.00 am - 9.00 pm. Trafalgar Square, London, WC2N 5DN https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk

The Forger's Masterclass - Ep.08 - John Singer Sargent

Abraham Bloemaert (1564-1651) A collection of paintings & drawings 4K Ultra HD Silent Slideshow

Abraham Bloemaert (1564-1651) A collection of paintings & drawings 4K Ultra HD Silent Slideshow A Dutch painter and printmaker in etching and engraving. He was one of the "Haarlem Mannerists" from about 1585, but in the new century altered his style to fit new Baroque trends. He mostly painted history subjects and some landscapes. He was an important teacher, who trained most of the Utrecht Caravaggisti, at least for a period Bloemaert was born in Gorinchem, Habsburg Netherlands, the son of the architect Cornelis Bloemaert I, who moved his family to Utrecht in 1575, where Abraham was first a pupil of Gerrit Splinter (pupil of Frans Floris) and of Joos de Beer. From the age of 15 or 16, he then spent three years in Paris from 1581–1583, studying six weeks under a Jehan Bassot (possibly Jean Cousin the Younger) and then under a Maistre Herry. While in the School of Fontainebleau he received further training from his fellow countryman Hieronymus Francken. He returned to Utrecht in 1583, just before the French Wars of Religion began, which destroyed much of the work at the Chateau of Fontainebleau. When his father was appointed city architect (Stads-bouwmeester) in Amsterdam 1591 he accompanied him there, and on his father's death in 1593 returned finally to Utrecht, where he set up a workshop and in 1594 became dean ("deken") of the "zadelaarsgilde", as from 1367 the painters were included in the saddlemaker's guild, with no Guild of St. Luke of their own. In 1611, along with the two other leading Utrecht painters, Joachim Wtewael and Paulus Moreelse, he was one of the founders of the Utrecht Guild of Saint Luke (St Lucas-gilde) a new Utrecht painters' guild, and became its deken in 1618. Many of Bloemaert's paintings were commissioned by Utrecht's clandestine Catholic churches. He died in Utrecht. Accorgint to the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, "he excelled more as a colourist than as a draughtsman, was extremely productive, and painted and etched historical and allegorical pictures, landscapes, still-life, animal pictures and flower pieces." In the first decade of the seventeenth-century, Bloemaert began formulating his landscape paintings to include picturesque ruined cottages and other pastoral elements. In these works, the religious or mythological figures play a subordinate role. Country life was to remain Bloemaert's favourite subject, which he depicted with increasing naturalism. He drew motifs such as peasant cottages, dovecotes and trees from life and then on his return to the studio worked them up into complex imaginary scenes. Among his many pupils were his four sons, Hendrick, Frederick, Cornelis, and Adriaan (all of whom achieved considerable reputation as painters or engravers). The RKD also lists Jan Aerntsz de Hel, Abraham Jacobsz van Almeloveen, Cornelius de Beer, Nicolaes van Bercheyck, Jan van Bijlert, the two Boths, the two Honthorsts, Leonaert Bramer, Bartholomeus Breenbergh, Hendrick ter Brugghen, Jacob Gerritsz Cuyp, Willem van Drielenburg, Wybrand de Geest, Nicolaus Knüpfer, Hendrik Munnicks, Frederick Pithan, Cornelis van Poelenburch, Henrik Schook, Anthoni Ambrosius Schouten, Robert Jansz Splinter, Matthias Stom, Herman van Swanevelt, Dirck Voorst, Quintijnus de Waerdt, Jan Baptist Weenix, and Peter Petersz van Zanen https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Bloemaert

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Draw fabric folds, based on a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci. SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/circlelineartschool for a new art video each week. Watch Next: How to Draw like Leonardo da Vinci: Head of a Warrior: https://youtu.be/DCRveDlxbrs Next up: How to Draw a Face: Playlist: http://bit.ly/1bevT1d Learn a simple way to draw fabric folds with a pencil in this step by step narrated drawing based on a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci. How to Draw Fabric after a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci Tom McPherson Circle Line Art School Leonardo da Vinci was born in 1452 in Vinci in Italy and loved to draw. He kept notebooks which are full of his thoughts and observations in words and sketches. Leonardo is famous for painting the Mona Lisa, perhaps the most famous painting in the world. It is now in The Louvre in Paris. There are only around fifteen of his paintings that have survived, but there are many of his notebooks and drawings. He drew whatever he was interested in and drawing was a way for him to understand what he was seeing. Sometimes his drawings are preparatory studies for parts of paintings. The Drawing in this art video is from 'Drapery Study for a Seated Figure" by Leonardo da Vinci, ca. 1470-75. It is now in The Louvre, Paris. The materials da Vinci used were a brush and gray tempera highlighted with white on a gray prepared linen canvas. The size of the original is 26.5 x 25.3 cm. In this drawing you can see Leonardo da Vinci's obsession with how light falls on fabric. The cloth he drew from would have been made wet and then placed on a clay sculpture or mannequin and allowed to dry. Leonardo da Vinci thought that all artists should keep a notebook or sketchbook to record what they see and notice before they forgot it. Leonardo da Vinci died in 1519 in Amboise in France. Links: Circle Line Art School: http://www.circlelineartschool.com The Louvre: http://www.louvre.fr/en

Albrecht Altdorfer (1480-1538) - A collection of paintings and drawings in 2K HD. Silent slideshow.

A German painter, engraver and architect of the Renaissance working in Regensburg. Along with Lucas Cranach the Elder and Wolf Huber he is regarded to be the main representative of the so-called Danube School setting biblical and historical subjects against landscape backgrounds of expressive colours. As an artist also making small intricate engravings he is seen to belong to the Nuremberg Little Masters.

Altdorfer was the pioneer painter of pure landscape, making them the subject of the painting, as well as compositions dominated by their landscape; these comprise much of his oeuvre. He believed that the human figure should not disrupt nature, but rather participate in it or imitate its natural processes. Taking and developing the landscape style of Lucas Cranach the Elder, he shows the hilly landscape of the Danube valley with thick forests of drooping and crumbling firs and larches hung with moss, and often dramatic colouring from a rising or setting sun.

His Landscape with Footbridge (National Gallery, London) of 1518–1520 is claimed to be the first pure landscape in oil. In this painting, Altdorfer places a large tree that is cut off by the margins at the center of the landscape, making it the central axis and focus within the piece. He uses anthropomorphism to give the tree human qualities such as the drapery of its limbs.

He also made many fine finished drawings, mostly landscapes, in pen and watercolour such as the Landscape with the Woodcutter in 1522. The drawing opens at ground level on a clearing surrounding an enormous tree that is placed in the center, dominating the picture. It poses and gesticulates as if it was human, splaying its branches out in every corner. Halfway up the tree trunk, hangs a gabled shrine. At the time, a shrine like this might shelter an image of the Crucifixion or the Virgin Mary, but since it is turned away from the viewer, we are not sure what it truly is. At the bottom of the tree, a tiny figure of a seated man, crossed legged, holds a knife and axe, declaring his status in society/occupation

Altdorfer often distorts perspective to subtle effect. His donor figures are often painted completely out of scale with the main scene, as in paintings of the previous centuries. He also painted some portraits; overall his painted oeuvre was not large. In his later works, Altdorfer moved more towards mannerism and began to depict the human form to the conformity of the Italian model, as well as dominate the picture with frank colors.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albrecht_Altdorfer

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