Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) - A collection of paintings 2K HD

author Master Painters   2 мес. назад
99 views

4 Like   0 Dislike

Michelangelo Biography: Who Was This Guy, Really? | Art History Lesson

You know Michelangelo for his great work on the Sistine Chapel. But you might not know that his true passion was for sculpture!  Find out more about Michelangelo’s childhood and his Wonder Years as he moves between sculptor and painter. Get even more Artrageous content! SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/artrageouswithnate Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/artrageousnate Follow us on Instagram https://instagram.com/artrageousnate Follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/artrageouswithnate

Sir Lawrence Alma Tadema: A collection of 194 paintings (HD)

Sir Lawrence Alma Tadema: A collection of 194 paintings (HD) Description: "Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Dutch-born painter of scenes from everyday life in the ancient world whose work was immensely popular in its time. Alma-Tadema, the son of a Dutch notary, studied art at the Antwerp Academy (1852–58) under the Belgian historical painter Hendrik Leys, assisting the painter in 1859 with frescoes for the Stadhuis (town hall) in Antwerp. During a visit to Italy in 1863, Alma-Tadema became interested in Greek and Roman antiquity and Egyptian archaeology, and afterward he depicted imagery almost exclusively from those sources. Moving to England, he became a naturalized British subject in 1873 and was elected a member of the Royal Academy in 1879. He was knighted in 1899. Alma-Tadema excelled at the accurate re-creation of ancient architecture and costumes and the precise depiction of textures of marble, bronze, and silk. His expert rendering of settings provides a backdrop for anecdotal scenes set in the ancient world. Alma-Tadema’s wife, Laura Epps, was also a painter.." Feel free to subscribe!

Roman Scandal 22: Elagabalus and the Problem of Teen Rule

In Rome the ruling elite found their new 15 year old Emperor to be repugnant, effeminate, and unprecedented. The revulsion was not because he brought a foreign god into Rome or that he exalted him in strange ways, but that Elagabalus placed himself above Jupiter. He circumcised himself and his male adherents, and had to be dissuaded from castration. He went out in public with the barbaric dress of his priesthood. The bizarre chants which the boy performed in public, together with his mother and grandmother, were nothing compared with the secret sacrifices that he offered to his god ... Of course, he met a very bad end. Based on the book by Frank Wallis, Roman Scandal.

Talking About: The Women of Amphissa, by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema

The Clark's Michael Cassin shares the story -- and some secrets -- behind Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema's painting of The Women of Amphissa.

Why is this painting so captivating? - James Earle and Christina Bozsik

View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-is-this-painting-so-captivating-james-earle-and-christina-bozsik On first glance, the painting “Las Meninas” (“The Maids of Honor”) might not seem terribly special, but it’s actually one of the most analyzed pieces in the history of art. Why is this painting by Diego Velazquez so captivating? James Earle and Christina Bozsik share the context and complexity behind this work of art. Lesson by James Earle and Christina Bozsik, animation by Zedem Media.

Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) - A collection of paintings 2K HD Silent slideshow

A Dutch painter of special British denizenship. Born in Dronrijp, the Netherlands, and trained at the Royal Academy of Antwerp, Belgium, he settled in England in 1870 and spent the rest of his life there. A classical-subject painter, he became famous for his depictions of the luxury and decadence of the Roman Empire, with languorous figures set in fabulous marbled interiors or against a backdrop of dazzling blue Mediterranean Sea and sky. Though admired during his lifetime for his draftsmanship and depictions of Classical antiquity, his work fell into disrepute after his death, and only since the 1960s has it been re-evaluated for its importance within nineteenth-century British art.

After his arrival in England, where he was to spend the rest of his life, Alma-Tadema's career was one of continued success. He became one of the most famous and highly paid artists of his time, acknowledged and rewarded. By 1871 he had met and befriended most of the major Pre-Raphaelite painters and it was in part due to their influence that the artist brightened his palette, varied his hues, and lightened his brushwork.

In 1872 Alma-Tadema organised his paintings into an identification system by including an opus number under his signature and assigning his earlier pictures numbers as well. Portrait of my sister, Artje, painted in 1851, is numbered opus I, while two months before his death he completed Preparations in the Coliseum, opus CCCCVIII. Such a system would make it difficult for fakes to be passed off as originals.

In 1873 Queen Victoria in Council by letters patent made Alma-Tadema and his wife what are now the last British Denizens (the legal process has theoretically not yet been abolished in the United Kingdom), with some limited special rights otherwise only accorded to and enjoyed by British subjects (what would now be called British citizens). The previous year he and his wife made a journey on the Continent that lasted five and a half months and took them through Brussels, Germany, and Italy. In Italy they were able to take in the ancient ruins again; this time he purchased several photographs, mostly of the ruins, which began his immense collection of folios with archival material sufficient for the documentation used in the completion of future paintings. In January 1876, he rented a studio in Rome. The family returned to London in April, visiting the Parisian Salon on their way back. In London he regularly met with fellow-artist Emil Fuchs.

Among the most important of his pictures during this period was An Audience at Agrippa's (1876). When an admirer of the painting offered to pay a substantial sum for a painting with a similar theme, Alma-Tadema simply turned the emperor around to show him leaving in After the Audience.

On 19 June 1879, Alma-Tadema was made a full Academician, his most personally important award. Three years later a major retrospective of his entire oeuvre was organised at the Grosvenor Gallery in London, including 185 of his pictures.

In 1883 he returned to Rome and, most notably, Pompeii, where further excavations had taken place since his last visit. He spent a significant amount of time studying the site, going there daily. These excursions gave him an ample source of subject matter as he began to further his knowledge of daily Roman life. At times, however, he integrated so many objects into his paintings that some said they resembled museum catalogues.

One of his most famous paintings is The Roses of Heliogabalus (1888) – based on an episode from the life of the debauched Roman Emperor Elagabalus (Heliogabalus), the painting depicts the Emperor suffocating his guests at an orgy under a cascade of rose petals. The blossoms depicted were sent weekly to the artist's London studio from the Riviera for four months during the winter of 1887–1888.

Among Alma-Tadema's works of this period are: An Earthly Paradise (1891), Unconscious Rivals (1893) Spring (1894), The Coliseum (1896) and The Baths of Caracalla (1899). Although Alma-Tadema's fame rests on his paintings set in Antiquity, he also painted portraits, landscapes and watercolours, and made some etchings himself (although many more were made of his paintings by others)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Alma-Tadema

Comments for video: