Vermeer: Master of Light (COMPLETE Documentary) [No Ads]

author D Torrez   6 год. назад
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1/4 The madness of Vermeer - Secret Lives of the Artists

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLM4S2hGZDSE6iQg7WyttFs4IcQ-NbhHtk First broadcast: 2003. Johannes Vermeer is one of our favourite painters, with his Girl with a Pearl Earring now deemed the 'Mona Lisa of the North'. But little is known about his life and for almost two centuries he was lost to obscurity. Andrew Graham-Dixon, travelling to Vermeer's hometown of Delft and a dramatic Dutch landscape of huge skies and windmills, embarks on a detective trail to uncover the life of a genius in hiding. Renowned for painting calm and beautiful interiors, the real life of Vermeer was marred by crime and violence. His life was a bid to escape the privations of his family and yet even a glamorous marriage and artistic success failed to save him from the fate he dreaded more than any other.

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Prof Philip Steadman (UCL) on film 'Tim's Vermeer'

In 2001 Professor Philip Steadman (UCL Bartlett School of Graduate Studies and the UCL Energy Institute) published a book called Vermeer's Camera, about the evidence for the great seventeenth-century Dutch painter using a camera obscura to make his pictures. Fast forward 13 years and the original ideas in the book have provided the foundation for the BAFTA-nominated documentary Tim's Vermeer. Further info: Slides courtesy of Prof Steadman; footage courtesy of Sony Pictures Releasing Prof Steadman's website - http://www.vermeerscamera.co.uk Trailer for Tim's Vermeer - http://youtu.be/CS_HUWs9c8c UCL is consistently ranked as one of the world's top universities. Across all disciplines our faculties are known for their research-intensive approaches, academic excellence and engagement with global challenges. This is the basis of our world-renowned degree programmes. Visit us at http://ucl.ac.uk.

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A fantastic 2001 documentary, with a huge chunk exploring Vermeer's compositional methods and techniques. Narrated by Meryl Streep

My rebuttal to Tim's Vermeer:

It's obvious that Vermeer played around with a camera obscura, but the more likely explanation is that he became so familiar with its optical distortion that he 'became' a camera obscura (he adopted its way of seeing as his aesthetic). The placement of his pointillist highlights on the bread in the Milkmaid (for example) is like a how a camera obscura would place highlights on a highly reflective object, but NEVER a loaf of bread. He placed them there because he was creating it in his imagination to look how shinier objects would look through a camera obscura, because he consciously enjoyed the effect of it and created it thus.

If Vermeer were dependent on a bulky optical device he would never have painted the View of Delft -- a massive outdoor landscape scene that was certainly created at home. It was generally impossible before the advent of tubed paint to work alla prima outside, and if the camera obscura were a trade secret he would have never have risked using it in public. Vermeer worked it up (along with the 'Little Street') from drawings and returned to the studio to make it.

Vermeer painted all of his interiors in the same room of his small house in Delft, yet the windows, the floor, the walls etc. always look different. Why? Because he was creating them in his head to look like a camera obscura, but not slavishly with a camera obscura.

Finally, X rays of Vermeer's paintings show that he reworked the placement of things over and over -- meaning he was building from imagination, not directly from an optical device.

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