Vermeer: Master of Light (COMPLETE Documentary) [No Ads]

author D Torrez   6 год. назад
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1/4 The madness of Vermeer - Secret Lives of the Artists

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLM4S2hGZDSE6iQg7WyttFs4IcQ-NbhHtk First broadcast: 2003. Johannes Vermeer is one of our favourite painters, with his Girl with a Pearl Earring now deemed the 'Mona Lisa of the North'. But little is known about his life and for almost two centuries he was lost to obscurity. Andrew Graham-Dixon, travelling to Vermeer's hometown of Delft and a dramatic Dutch landscape of huge skies and windmills, embarks on a detective trail to uncover the life of a genius in hiding. Renowned for painting calm and beautiful interiors, the real life of Vermeer was marred by crime and violence. His life was a bid to escape the privations of his family and yet even a glamorous marriage and artistic success failed to save him from the fate he dreaded more than any other.

Velazquez - The Painter's Painter [Documentary]

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez baptised June 6, 1599 -- August 6, 1660) was a Spanish painter who was the leading artist in the court of King Philip IV and one of the most important painters of the Spanish Golden Age. He was an individualistic artist of the contemporary Baroque period, important as a portrait artist. In addition to numerous renditions of scenes of historical and cultural significance, he painted scores of portraits of the Spanish royal family, other notable European figures, and commoners, culminating in the production of his masterpiece Las Meninas (1656).

Tim's Vermeer // Film clips (NL sub)

3 september verkrijgbaar op DVD // A partir de 3 septembre en DVD Tim Jenison, een utivinder uit Texas, (Video Toaster, LightWave, TriCaster) probeert om één van de grootste mysteries uit de kunstwereld op te lossen: Hoe slaagde 17de eeuwe Nederlandse Meester Johannes Vermeer ("Meisje Met De Parel") erin om zo foto-realistisch te kunnen schilderen, 150 jaar voor de uitvinding van fotografie? Het epische onderzoeksproject v probeert Jenison's theorie te testen, die al even uitzonderlijk is als wat hij uiteindelijk ontdekt. Over een tijdsspanne van 10 jaar, leidt Jenisons avontuur hem naar Delft, Nederland (waar Vermeer zijn meesterwreken schilderde), op een pelgrimstocht naar de Noordkust van Yorkshire om er artiest David Hockney te ontmoeten, en uiteindelijk naar Buckingham Palace om er de Vermeer van de Queen te zien. ------------------------------------------------------ Tim Jenison, un inventeur texan, tente de résoudre un des plus grands mystères du monde de l'art : Comment le maître flamand Johannes Vermeer a-t-il pu peindre des toiles aussi réalistes 150 ans avant l'invention de la photographie ? Jenison ira des Pays-Bas à la côte nord du Yorkshire pour y rencontrer David Hockney et même jusqu'au palais de Buckingham pour résoudre cette énigme et son parcours s'avérera tout aussi extraordinaire que ce qu'il découvrira en cours de route.

Norman Rockwell Documentary

Norman Perceval Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th-century American author, painter and illustrator. His works enjoy a broad popular appeal in the United States for its reflection of American culture. Rockwell is most famous for the cover illustrations of everyday life he created for The Saturday Evening Post magazine over nearly five decades.[1] Among the best-known of Rockwell's works are the Willie Gillis series, Rosie the Riveter, The Problem We All Live With, Saying Grace, and the Four Freedoms series. He also is noted for his 64-year relationship with the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), during which he produced covers for their publication Boys' Life, calendars, and other illustrations. These works include popular images that reflect the Scout Oath and Scout Law such as The Scoutmaster, A Scout is Reverent[2] and A Guiding Hand,[3] among many others. Norman Rockwell was a prolific artist, producing more than 4,000 original works in his lifetime. Most of his works are either in public collections, or have been destroyed in fire or other misfortunes. Rockwell also was commissioned to illustrate more than 40 books, including Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn as well as painting the portraits for Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon, as well as those of foreign figures, including Gamal Abdel Nasser and Jawaharlal Nehru. His portrait subjects included Judy Garland. One of his last portraits was of Colonel Sanders in 1973. His annual contributions for the Boy Scouts calendars between 1925 and 1976 (Rockwell was a 1939 recipient of the Silver Buffalo Award, the highest adult award given by the Boy Scouts of America[4]), were only slightly overshadowed by his most popular of calendar works: the "Four Seasons" illustrations for Brown & Bigelow that were published for 17 years beginning in 1947 and reproduced in various styles and sizes since 1964. He painted six images for Coca-Cola advertising.[5] Illustrations for booklets, catalogs, posters (particularly movie promotions), sheet music, stamps, playing cards, and murals (including "Yankee Doodle Dandy" and "God Bless the Hills", which was completed in 1936 for the Nassau Inn in Princeton, New Jersey) rounded out Rockwell's œuvre as an illustrator. Rockwell's work was dismissed by serious art critics in his lifetime.[6] Many of his works appear overly sweet in the opinion of modern critics,[7] especially the Saturday Evening Post covers, which tend toward idealistic or sentimentalized portrayals of American life. This has led to the often-deprecatory adjective, "Rockwellesque". Consequently, Rockwell is not considered a "serious painter" by some contemporary artists, who regard his work as bourgeois and kitsch. Writer Vladimir Nabokov sneered that Rockwell's brilliant technique was put to "banal" use, and wrote in his book Pnin: "That Dalí is really Norman Rockwell's twin brother kidnapped by Gypsies in babyhood". He is called an "illustrator" instead of an artist by some critics, a designation he did not mind, as that was what he called himself.[8] In his later years, however, Rockwell began receiving more attention as a painter when he chose more serious subjects such as the series on racism for Look magazine.[9] One example of this more serious work is The Problem We All Live With, which dealt with the issue of school racial integration. The painting depicts a young black girl, Ruby Bridges, flanked by white federal marshals, walking to school past a wall defaced by racist graffiti.[10] This painting was displayed in the White House when Bridges met with President Obama in 201

fake or fortune S04E03 Vidto

A fantastic 2001 documentary, with a huge chunk exploring Vermeer's compositional methods and techniques. Narrated by Meryl Streep

My rebuttal to Tim's Vermeer:

It's obvious that Vermeer played around with a camera obscura, but the more likely explanation is that he became so familiar with its optical distortion that he 'became' a camera obscura (he adopted its way of seeing as his aesthetic). The placement of his pointillist highlights on the bread in the Milkmaid (for example) is like a how a camera obscura would place highlights on a highly reflective object, but NEVER a loaf of bread. He placed them there because he was creating it in his imagination to look how shinier objects would look through a camera obscura, because he consciously enjoyed the effect of it and created it thus.

If Vermeer were dependent on a bulky optical device he would never have painted the View of Delft -- a massive outdoor landscape scene that was certainly created at home. It was generally impossible before the advent of tubed paint to work alla prima outside, and if the camera obscura were a trade secret he would have never have risked using it in public. Vermeer worked it up (along with the 'Little Street') from drawings and returned to the studio to make it.

Vermeer painted all of his interiors in the same room of his small house in Delft, yet the windows, the floor, the walls etc. always look different. Why? Because he was creating them in his head to look like a camera obscura, but not slavishly with a camera obscura.

Finally, X rays of Vermeer's paintings show that he reworked the placement of things over and over -- meaning he was building from imagination, not directly from an optical device.

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