World's First Car!

author Veritasium   1 год. назад
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The Smallest Car in the World at the BBC - Top Gear - BBC

Jeremy drives the Peel P50, the world's smallest production car to work at the BBC and meets a few famous faces along the way. Subscribe for more awesome Top Gear videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=Topgear Top Gear YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/topgear TopGear.com website: http://www.topgear.com Top Gear Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/topgear Top Gear Twitter: http://twitter.com/BBC_topgear This is a channel from BBC Worldwide who help fund new BBC programmes.

5 REALLY OLD Car Startups - good feels

► Top Fives is a Disney Partnered Channel! ► New channel! https://goo.gl/D7HHdY It seems like you all enjoyed my previous video on antique machine startups, so we're keeping to a similar theme for today's video! *Original content produced in studio by JJO Video Media* Several segments are licensed under Creative Commons (CC) The Revs Institute for Automotive Research (CC) The Top Fives channel brings you informational and entertaining top five videos from around the world. Join us and subscribe for more. Follow us on Facebook! https://facebook.com/topfivesyoutube Note: The videos featured on the Top Fives channel are for educational and informational purposes. If you have a good idea for a video, leave us a comment! We try to read each and every comment made.

The Most Radioactive Places on Earth

Who on Earth is exposed to the most ionizing radiation? Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe I'm filming a documentary for TV about how Uranium and radioactivity have shaped the modern world. It will be broadcast in mid-2015, details to come. The filming took me to the most radioactive places on Earth (and some places, which surprisingly aren't as radioactive as you'd think). Chernobyl and Fukushima were incredible to see as they present post-apocalyptic landscapes. I also visited nuclear power plants, research reactors, Marie Curie's institute, Einstein's apartment, nuclear medicine areas of hospitals, uranium mines, nuclear bomb sites, and interviewed numerous experts. Notes about measuring radiation: Sieverts are a measure of 'effective dose' - that means they measure the biological impact of the energy transferred to tissues from radiation. Obviously I owe a debt to the fantastic chart made by xkcd, which inspired my visual approach to this video. https://xkcd.com/radiation/ DOSES MAY VARY The level of radiation varies widely around the world depending mainly on altitude and geology (excluding nuclear accidents). Estimates of particular doses also vary. All numbers reported in this video should be taken as order of magnitude only. The most contentious claim may be that smokers receive the highest dose of ionizing radiation. This is not a whole body dose, but a dose to the lungs as specified in the video. References are here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_effects_of_tobacco http://www.rmeswi.com/36.html Special thanks to: Physics Girl: https://www.youtube.com/physicswoman MinutePhysics: https://www.youtube.com/minutephysics Natalie Tran: https://www.youtube.com/communitychannel Bionerd23: https://www.youtube.com/bionerd23 Nigel and Helen for feedback on earlier drafts of this video. Music is "Stale Mate"

An Affordable 3D-Printed Arm

Students at UCF are designing an inexpensive 3D printed arm for kids. To find out more and to get involved, check out: http://office.tumblr.com Big thanks to Microsoft and the Collective Project for introducing me to Albert and his amazing team. They are continuing to help people around the world one hand at a time and they could use your help. Learn more and see how you can get involved by checking out The Collective Project on Tumblr, follow @MSONeNote on Twitter or head over to http://Onenote.com/collectiveproject

The Truth About Toilet Swirl - Southern Hemisphere

SYNCHRONIZE WITH DESTIN’S VIDEO: http://bit.ly/NorthernSwirl Both videos on one page (for desktop): http://bit.ly/ToiletSwirl Subscribe to Smarter Every Day: http://bit.ly/SubscribeSED Click to tweet: http://bit.ly/ToiletSwirlTWT Some notes: We each repeated the experiment 3 times, and got the same results every time. For those of you who might be skeptical, great! A right circular prismatic kiddie pool is only $10 and you can do the experiment for yourself at your latitude. There's really no reason you shouldn't do it for yourself. Veritasium on Instagram: http://instagram.com/veritasium Patreon Support Link: http://www.patreon.com/veritasium Twitter: http://twitter.com/veritasium http://www.facebook.com/veritasium Smarter Every Day Instagram: http://instagram.com/smartereveryday Patreon Support Link: http://www.patreon.com/smartereveryday Twitter: http://twitter.com/smartereveryday www.facebook.com/SmarterEveryDay Gordon McGladdery did all of the sound design for the video. We used two songs from other artists (licensed of course). Derek split the first one up so it fades from video to video, and Gordon split the instruments up on the second one. There are violins on one video and percussion on the other for example. It's really neat. The neat earth animation at the beginning and the synchronizing timer was made by http://eisenfeuer.com/. He also made still images of the earth from the top and the bottom. Thanks to Vanessa for filming in Sydney: http://youtube.com/braincraftvideo MORE INFO: There was a study performed at MIT years ago (http://web.mit.edu/hml/ncfmf/09VOR.pdf) that explained the physics involved. We repeated some of these demonstrations, but on opposite sides of the globe…and in a way that can be easily understood. This site is a great resource on the Coriolis effect and ways people have gotten it wrong: http://www.ems.psu.edu/~fraser/Bad/Ba...

I got to drive the world's first car (replica), patented by Benz in 1886
Check out the series on new safety features: http://ve42.co/MB
This video is sponsored by Mercedes-Benz, who invited me to come to Stuttgart to see their latest cars, crash test facilities and experience the innovations they are working on.

Physics is something that is directly applicable to car safety. Cars go fast, but they also sometimes collide with obstacles, which brings them to a sudden stop, subjecting the car and occupants to very high accelerations, which can cause injury or death. So the major idea to improve car safety is to reduce these accelerations and there are a number of ways to do this:

Passive safety:

Seat belts: keep passengers in the vehicle, preventing them from continuing with constant velocity, flying through the windshield and suffering a worse deceleration when they make contact with the road.

Crumple zones: increase the distance over which deceleration occurs, thereby reducing peak magnitude of deceleration.

Air bags: increase the distance over which the head decelerates, again reducing peak magnitude of deceleration of the head.

Active Safety:
Anti-lock braking system: rather than 'locking' the wheels as can happen if you slam on the brakes with a traditional braking system leading to the tires skidding across the road, ABS attempts to control the amount of braking so that the tires always roll with static friction in contact with the road. This increases the backward frictional force that can be applied to the tires, again increasing the distance over which deceleration occurs, and it gives the driver an opportunity to steer to avoid the collision (hence why it's referred to as an active safety system).

Special thanks to Mercedes for having me visit facilities in Stuttgart. I had a lot of fun making these videos so please do check out the series on Mercedes Benz's channel: http://ve42.co/MB

Filmed by Simon Schneider
Edited by Hoplite Creative and Trevor Carlee

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