Albert Edelfelt: A collection of 122 paintings (HD)

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Leonardo da Vinci: A collection of 148 paintings (HD)

Leonardo da Vinci: A collection of 148 paintings (HD) Description: "Da Vinci was one of the great creative minds of the Italian Renaissance, hugely influential as an artist and sculptor but also immensely talented as an engineer, scientist and inventor. Leonardo da Vinci was born on 15 April 1452 near the Tuscan town of Vinci, the illegitimate son of a local lawyer. He was apprenticed to the sculptor and painter Andrea del Verrocchio in Florence and in 1478 became an independent master. In about 1483, he moved to Milan to work for the ruling Sforza family as an engineer, sculptor, painter and architect. From 1495 to 1497 he produced a mural of 'The Last Supper' in the refectory of the Monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan. Da Vinci was in Milan until the city was invaded by the French in 1499 and the Sforza family forced to flee. He may have visited Venice before returning to Florence. During his time in Florence, he painted several portraits, but the only one that survives is the famous 'Mona Lisa' (1503-1506). In 1506, da Vinci returned to Milan, remaining there until 1513. This was followed by three years based in Rome. In 1517, at the invitation of the French king Francis I, Leonardo moved to the Château of Cloux, near Amboise in France, where he died on 2 May 1519. The fame of Da Vinci's surviving paintings has meant that he has been regarded primarily as an artist, but the thousands of surviving pages of his notebooks reveal the most eclectic and brilliant of minds. He wrote and drew on subjects including geology, anatomy (which he studied in order to paint the human form more accurately), flight, gravity and optics, often flitting from subject to subject on a single page, and writing in left-handed mirror script. He 'invented' the bicycle, airplane, helicopter, and parachute some 500 years ahead of their time. If all this work had been published in an intelligible form, da Vinci's place as a pioneering scientist would have been beyond dispute. Yet his true genius was not as a scientist or an artist, but as a combination of the two: an 'artist-engineer'. His painting was scientific, based on a deep understanding of the workings of the human body and the physics of light and shade. His science was expressed through art, and his drawings and diagrams show what he meant, and how he understood the world to work." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com --- Thanks for all support!

Edwin Henry Landseer: A collection of 162 paintings (HD)

Edwin Henry Landseer: A collection of 162 paintings (HD) Description: "Landseer was a brilliant animal painter whose work had added appeal in the Victorian age because of his tendency to give his animal scenes a moral dimension. These pictures were widely circulated in his time in the form of engravings, often made by his brother Thomas. Edwin Landseer was the youngest son of an engraver. The three Landseer brothers studied under Benjamin Robert Haydon, the historical painter, from 1815. Haydon encouraged Landseer to study animal anatomy. In 1816, Landseer entered the Royal Academy Schools, but he had already exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition in the previous year. He was elected Associate of the Royal Academy in 1826 aged only twenty four, and full Academician in 1831 when not yet thirty. In 1824 Landseer made the first of many visits to Scotland. He fell in love with the Highlands, which inspired many of his later paintings such as 'The Monarch of the Glen' (Royal Academy 1851, John Dewar & Sons Limited). He also visited Sir Walter Scott, who admired his paintings and chose him as one of the illustrators to the Waverley edition of his novels. In the 1830s his work gained wide popularity and was bought both by the aristocracy and the newly important middle class. He himself moved freely in aristocratic circles, and after 1836 he enjoyed royal patronage, especially in the 1840s when Victoria and Albert also discovered Scotland. He paid his first visit to their home, Balmoral in 1850 to paint a large group portrait of the royal family. He was knighted that year even though the painting was never finished. After a breakdown in 1840, partly caused by the failure of the royal portrait, Landseer had a permanent fight against depression and ill health, although he continued to paint brilliantly almost until the end of his life. In the 1860s he modelled the lions at the base of Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square and these were unveiled in 1867. In 1866 he declined the presidency of the Royal Academy, and after 1870 sank slowly into madness. A major exhibition of his work was held at the Tate Gallery in 1981, organised by Richard Ormond." - H. M. --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com --- Thanks for all support!

Helen Frankenthaler Tribute Film

Helen Frankenthaler, 2005 Inductee to Connecticut Women's Hall of Fame, induction tribute film. Frankenthaler (1928-2011) was a revolutionary abstract expressionist painter. Learn more at www.cwhf.org

Fritz Thaulow: A collection of 157 paintings (HD)

Fritz Thaulow: A collection of 157 paintings (HD) Description: "Norwegian painter Frits Thaulow was born in 1847 and traveled throughout Europe. Though famous for his landscape painting, he is also known for combining Realism and Impressionism in his work. Born in a small town in Norway, Frits Thaulow was the son of a wealthy chemist. His father’s money gave him the chance to work with some of the leading artists of his time. Thaulow worked with several tutors and painters to perfect his art. Early in his career, Thaulow studied maritime art and planned to work in the field, but he later found himself interested in landscape art. After traveling between Norway and France for several years, Thaulow made the permanent move to France, where he lived and worked for the last few years of his life. Thaulow moved to Paris early in his career and worked on a number of paintings. Though Realism was popular in Norway, Paris was the center of the Impressionist movement. When he attempted to paint Impressionist landscapes, he found himself incorporating realistic elements from his childhood. Art historians now often regard the artist’s work as a combination of Realist and Impressionist elements. Those elements are clear inHorses Watering at the Bridge at Montreiul sur Mer. The interesting lines and pale color choices are clearly the work of an Impressionist, while the realistic look of the horses and the houses on the shore fall into the Realism movement. Another of his famous pieces is Summer Landscape with a Bridge at Beaulieu, which centered on a small creek. In 1880, Thaulow left Paris and returned to Norway, where he lived for more than a decade. While in France, he learned many Impressionist techniques that he later brought to his home country. Thaulow often focused on the landscapes and cities near his hometown. He completed a series of paintings of skiers on the slopes of a small town before moving back to Paris. Moving to France helped Thaulow expand his paintings to include French settings. He created the pieces The Battery and At Quimperle later in his career. Thaulow spent the last fourteen years of his life living in Paris and painting the French countryside as well as recreating memories from his home country. By combining elements of Realism and Impressionism in his landscapes, Thaulow created his own movement, and he’s responsible for introducing the Impressionist style to Norway." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com --- Thanks for all support!

WORST Art Restoration Fails

Conservators or art restorers are considered the magicians of the art world. Over the course of time, paintings are bound to lose their original color, suffer damage and fade… and thanks to highly skilled conservators, we are able to restore these pieces back to their original glory. But sometimes, very rarely, these beautiful pieces get ruined by someone and the damage is irreversible. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 7 - Leave it to the experts Imagine a restoration being the reason that people quit their jobs? That’s what happened when experts saw this restoration of the Virgin and Child with St Anne. This painting was done by Leonardo da Vinci, and some experts quit their jobs in protest when they saw this version. As clearly seen, the painting is vastly lighter, as if this scenario took place on a sunny day. These experts claim that this is in complete contrast to Da Vinci’s vision. Although, how would we really know what was going through his head at the time of painting this masterpiece? 6 - A Whiter Shade of Pale There are very few portraits of Shakespeare in the world, and two were irreversibly ruined. The team in charge of restoring the painting assumed they were removing an outer layer of paint to reveal the original paintings underneath. Turns out, they ended up wiping away the original artwork. It’s believed the paintings were altered during Shakespeare’s lifetime and that the artists back then did it purposefully to show how he had aged. So, when the top layer was removed, underneath was a younger-looking Shakespeare. Currently, the National Portrait Gallery is deciding whether or not to clean up one of their portraits of Shakespeare, which hasn’t been touched up in 400-years! 5 - Not your best look Head on over to Russia and you’ll find quite a large number of Lenin statues around, but none quite like this one. In Krasnodar Krai one such statue underwent a bit of restoration. It turned out like a bit of a monkey, and remained that way until photos circulated online in 2016, and only after that was he given a make-over to return him to his former self. 4 - A change is as good as a holiday You would think that taking something that is already in ruins and giving it a make-over would automatically improve it – but not in this case. Not a piece of art per se, but the El Castillo de Matrera is a historical castle from 9th century Spain. This National Monument was damaged by intense rain in 2013, so a project was undertaken to restore it. The end result looks like the original bricks have been stuck on a grey concrete building. It was called a “heritage massacre” and many people were left deeply shocked by the outcome, although ironically – the building was nominated for an Architizer A+ Award and actually won the people’s choice! 3 - Quite the artist A restoration project that made headlines globally took place in a 16th-century Spanish Church and the artist in question was Cecilia Giménez. The 81-year old lady quickly received the nickname Ecce Mono, which means Behold the Monkey, because she transformed a 19th century fresco of Jesus into something closely resembling a monkey. She thought she was doing the Church a favor, and initially it was anything but – however, give it a bit of a time and she ended up doing the sleep town a huge favor. Misericordia has received thousands of visitors through their doors, all hoping to catch a glance of her artwork and they’ve all left some wonderful donations, very much needed by the Church. 2 - World’s Worst The restoration of the Great Wall of China has been called the “World’s Worst Restoration”, although after seeing our previous entry – it’s quite possible this restoration project has lost its number 1 spot. It’s no secret that the Great Wall of China is slowly decaying, and a number of years ago a task team set out to reconstruct a certain section of it, which they did – using concrete! The Chinese slammed this terrible job online, and many promises were made to ensure nothing like that ever happened again! 1 - More often, they just get it right After seeing all the disastrous efforts of restoration, let’s have a look at one that is mind-blowingly amazing! The Adoration of the Shepherds, by the Italian Renaissance master Sebastiano del Piombo, was in total ruins. It really looked like there was no hope for it. The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge commissioned this restoration, and it took them 10-years to complete! The painting dates back to 1511 – 1512, and if you see it today, it would be hard to imagine it as this old painting that almost didn’t make it.

Albert Edelfelt: A collection of 122 paintings (HD)

Description: "Albert Gustaf Aristides Edelfelt (21 July 1854-18 August 1905) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish painter.
Albert Edelfelt was born in Porvoo, Finland.
His father Carl Albert was an architect.
Admired Edelfelt the poet Johan Ludvig Runeberg, who was a friend of the family.
The company of Runeberg had a lasting impact on Edelfelt, who from time to time turned to scenes from Finnish history in his paintings.
Went on to Illustrate Edelfelt Runeberg's epic poem The Tales of Ensign Stål.
He Studied art in Antwerp (1873-1874), Paris (1874-1878) and Saint Petersburg (1881-1882).
He married Baroness (friherinnan) Ellan de la Chapelle in 1888 and They HAD one child.
Edelfelt was one of the first Finnish artists to Achieve international fame.
He enjoyed considerable success in Paris and was one of the founders of the Realist art movement in Finland.
He Influenced several younger Finnish painters and fellow Finnish artists Helped Such as Akseli Gallen-Kallela to make Their breakthrough in Paris."

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