Edward Seago: A collection of 77 paintings (HD)

author LearnFromMasters   1 год. назад
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Edward Seago for beginners

Painting a copy from a Seago. Just to learn from te masters! Never sell or post someone else work if it is your own! Edward Brian (Ted) Seago RBA ARWS RWS (31 March 1910 – 19 January 1974) was an English artist who painted in both oils and watercolours. Seago died of a brain tumour in London on 19 January 1974. In his will he requested that one third of his paintings currently in his Norwich studio were to be destroyed. There remain about 19,000 water colors and 300 oil paintings worldwide. I hear a lot of times, Use the backside but some papers don't have a good backside. and the point is! I destroy copies, because I see a lot of copies everywhere. And that is not good! Use the backside, make a collage, make bookmarks. I know! But this is a example! I have a lot of framed work with on the backside a watercolour! So Yes I use backsides. (with the right paper)

Peder Mørk Mønsted: A collection of 284 paintings (HD)

Peder Mørk Mønsted: A collection of 284 paintings (HD) Description: "Peder Mønsted was born in Balle Mölle, near Grenna in eastern Denmark on 10th December 1859. He studied at the Prince Ferdinand’s Drawing School, Aarhus where he studied under Andries Fritz (1828-1906), a landscape and portrait painter, before moving to Copenhagen. Here he studied at the Royal Academy of Art between 1875 and 1878, and was taught figure painting by Julius Exner (1825-1910). Here too he would have come across the work of artists such as Christen Kobke (1810-1848), an outstanding colourist and Peter Christian Skovgaard (1817-1875), a romantic nationalist painter, a knowledge of whose work is seen in the Danish landscapes and beech forests of Mønsted’s. As early as 1874, at the age of 15, he took part in the December Exhibition in Copenhagen. In 1878 Mønsted left the Academy to study under the artist Peder Severin Krøyer (1851-1909). Mønsted travelled extensively throughout his long career, being a frequent visitor to Switzerland, Italy and North Africa. In 1883 Mønsted travelled to Paris where he worked with William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825-1905) for four months. As early as 1884, he visited North Africa returning later in the decade. The early years of the 20th century saw Mønsted returning to Switzerland, the south of France and Italy, the latter being the source of inspiration for many Scandinavian artists of the 19th century. The war years curtailed Mønsted’s travel to Norway and Sweden, however the 1920’s and 1930’s saw him return to the Mediterranean. From 1879 to 1941 he exhibited regularly at the annual Charlottenborg Exhibition. Throughout his long career, Mønsted continued to paint the Danish landscape and coastline. His is a romantic, poetic view of nature; he was an artist who depicted the grandeur and monumental aspect of the landscape, with a remarkable eye for detail and colour. He was also known for a number of portraits, including that of King George I of Greece. " --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com SUPPORT MY WORK AT: https://www.patreon.com/LearnFromMasters LIST OF ARTISTS already posted on LearnFromMasters: https://goo.gl/hri4HE --- Thank you so much for your support!

John Constable: A collection of 248 paintings (HD)

John Constable: A collection of 248 paintings (HD) Description: "Constable was, with Joseph Turner, the major English landscape painter of the 19th century. He is best known for his paintings of the English countryside. John Constable was born on 11 June 1776 in East Bergholt in Suffolk, the son of a prosperous miller. He was educated at Dedham Grammar School, then worked for his father's business. He persuaded his father to send him to study at the Royal Academy Schools, which he entered in 1799. In 1816, after much opposition from her father, Constable married Maria Bicknell. She suffered from tuberculosis, so they lived in Hampstead in north London, which was thought to be healthier than central London. In the early 1820s they began frequent visits to Brighton, also for Maria's health. Constable believed that his paintings should come as directly as possible from nature. He made hundreds of outdoor oil sketches, capturing the changing skies and effects of light. He was happiest painting locations he knew well, particularly in his native Suffolk. He also frequently painted in Salisbury, Brighton and Hampstead, making numerous studies of the clouds over the Heath. Maria's death in 1828 was devastating for Constable and left him responsible for their seven children. The following year he was belatedly elected to full membership of the Royal Academy. Constable received little other recognition in Britain in his lifetime, but was much better known in France. In 1824, 'The Hay Wain' won a gold medal at the Salon in Paris and Constable had a profound influence on French Romantic artists. Constable died in London on 31 March 1837." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com --- Thanks for all support!

Tips on what makes a great painting, by an art dealer with twenty five years experience

There are certain elements to any painting that makes it work, learn the three elements that Dr. Mark Sublette looks for in every painting before he buys. The tricks of the trade are shared through this highly informative video, great for beginners to serious collectors. Website: https://www.medicinemangallery.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/medicinemangallery Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/medicinemangallery Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/art-dealer-diaries/id1384036101?mt=2 Tips on what makes a great painting, by an art dealer with twenty five years experience Today I want to talk about tips on what makes a great painting. Paintings come in a variety of types, design, and quality – some are great, some are terrible, and if you can't figure out what makes a great one from a terrible one, you've got to watch this video. You probably have all heard, “Oh, that guy has a great eye.” And what that means is that person that they're saying has a great eye understands the works of art and what makes something good or not. And pretty much having a great eye (means) you can learn a lot of the aspects by just seeing a ton of stuff and going to good galleries and museums, and seeing what's on the walls. Generally, they got there for a reason because the person who is making the decisions hopefully does have a good eye. This is what my eye tells me to look for when I'm looking at pieces of art, whether to buy, or in artists, to take in as a potential person for my stable. But, one is composition. The painting here to your right is a Maynard Dixon. Maynard Dixon had great composition, (it was) one of his strongest points. If you look at the piece, you can see that the tree is done just perfectly in the setting that you like, and see how the road kind of meanders into the distance. Everything about this works: with the tree and the way the mountains are on the back, and especially that road. This is very key to looking at a good painting. If the tree had been moved in a different position where it's jetted, it just doesn't flow. You have to feel a flow in a composition, and that's kind of what you look for. Two, is symmetry. Symmetry really, for me, refers to: did they get it right size-wise? Is the tree big enough in comparison to where it should be in the mountain? Is the road the right size, or is it off? And one of the things I look for: are the hands too big on a person or is the person's head out of proportion? Or, is the boat wrong compared to the water? Is the shadow incorrect? You know they have to get symmetry; they have to get this dimensionality on their pieces, especially if they're realism. It’s a little different in modern art, and I'll talk about that in another lecture, but it's very important that you look for symmetry. There's been many – a very important show that I've gone to that we, as dealers, or artists will come around, and we'll look at paintings and go, “Oh my gosh, they're giant people that are walking there,” because they just got the proportionality completely off to what they were doing against the landscape. So, it's very important. Make sure you look at that before you ever buy a painting. Three is color palette. Now: is it a pleasing color palette, or is it something that really just doesn't work for you? Part of this is personal and that's fine. Some people like bright colors (and) some people don't. These kinds of things are a little bit more on the subjective than objective (side), but what I like to look for: is it a pleasing mix? And more importantly, for me, does the artist have the same palette that I can always recognize? Because if I'm looking to buy a specific artist, let's say, Maynard Dixon, I want to know exactly what his color palette is. And I can tell on Dixon's, who I specialize in, from what time frame that painting is strictly by his color palette, because it changed over time – it went from a very bright to a little less bright to a flat. And that's okay, and artists do that, but I know that he was just in his transformation of how he saw his color in his color palette, and that's a very key thing. The final thing has to do with (and this is very interesting, and it may take you a little time to appreciate it) but actually brushstrokes. I can tell an incredible amount about artists by how they do their brush strokes. A very confident artist will leave just a single brush stroke each time. When they put their brush on that palette, mix the color, and put it on the canvas, they know where it's going, and I can tell that they knew where it was going. It's very distinctive where it's going...

Alexei Savrasov: A collection of 169 paintings (HD)

Alexei Savrasov: A collection of 169 paintings (HD) Description: " Alexey Kondratyevich Savrasov is one of the Russia’s most remarkable landscape painters, the originator of the so-called ‘mood landscape’. Savrasov was born into the family of a merchant. He began to draw early; in 1838 he enrolled as a student at the Moscow School of Painting and Sculpture (graduated in 1850), and immediately began to specialize in landscape painting. His efforts of the 1850s reveal the difficult process he was going through trying to overcome the academic tradition in depicting landscape. The Russian public liked his lyrical landscapes like View of the Kremlin from the Krimsky Bridge in Inclement Weather (1851) and gradually he made his name. In 1852, the artist traveled to the Ukraine where he produced a series of views of its rolling steppes The Steppe in Daytime (1852), which reflect the various aspects of his favorite subject, wide-open spaces. By the invitation of the Grand Duchess Maria Nikolayevna, the President of the Russian Academy of Arts, who commissioned several works from Savrasov, he moved to the shores of the Gulf of Finland in the neighborhood of St. Petersburg. Though the scenery there was alien to his spirit, he was able to find some innovations never seen in academic landscape painting before. In 1854, for his pictures Seashore in the Neighborhood of Oranienbaum and View in the Neighborhood of Oranienbaum (1854) he was awarded the title of Fellow of the Academy. In 1857, Savrasov became a teacher in the Moscow School of Painting and Sculpture, from which he had graduated. His best disciples Isaac Levitan and Constantin Korovin always remembered their teacher with admiration and gratefulness. In the 1860s, he traveled to England and Switzerland. His introduction to English landscape painting was most influential. The best works of the period include View of the Swiss Alps from Interlaken (1862), Rustic View (1867), Rafts (1868). The Rooks Have Come (1871) is considered by many critics to be the highest point in Savrasov’s artistic career. Using a common, even trivial, episode of birds returning home, and an extremely simple landscape, Savrasov managed to show very emotionally the transition of nature from winter to spring. It was a new type of lyrical landscape painting, called later by critics ‘the mood landscape’. The picture made his name famous. In the late 1870s and early 1880s there were many good landscapes, though early spring in the countryside remained the favorite subject of the artist. The most notable are A Winter Road (1870s), Country Road (1873), View of the Moscow Kremlin. Spring (1873), Spring Thaw. Yaroslavl. (1874), Rainbow (1875), A Provincial Cottage. Spring. (1878), Landscape with a Rainbow (1881), Sea of Mud (1894). The misfortunes in his personal life, may be dissatisfaction with his artistic career were the reason of his tragedy – he became an alcoholic. All attempts of his relatives and friends to help him were in vain. The last years of his life Savrasov led the life of a pauper, wandering from shelter to shelter. Only the doorkeeper of the School of Painting and Pavel Tretyakov (the founder of the Tretyakov Gallery) were present at his funeral." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com --- Thanks for all support!

Edward Seago: A collection of 77 paintings (HD)

Description: "Edward Seago enjoyed the position as one of the most popular British artists of the 20th century. He began painting at the age of seven when he was confined to his room with a heart condition. Later, fully recovered, he would study with Bernard Priestman.

He became a successful illustrator in the 1930's, working for, among others, England's poet laureate of the sea, John Masefield. After serving with the royal engineers in WWII, he would spend the remainder of his life painting and writing. He was an avid sailor which is evident in the accuracy and flavor of his sea paintings.

Exhibiting widely, his famous one man shows at Colnaghi's would usually sell out on the first day. People were known to line up by 6 am to secure the painting of their choice. Examination of Seago's work shows the influence of the Dutch 17th century school and British artists such as John Constable. His two greatest influences however were the French impressionist Eugene Boudin and American painter James McNeil Whistler."

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