Edward Seago: A collection of 77 paintings (HD)

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Watercolour in Edward Seago Style

I begin with a sketch I made from a photo, and generally I work further from that sketch in watercolour in Edward Seago's style. The watercolour can be seen here on Flickr https://flic.kr/p/24PgvmY Edward Seago Colours used Yellow Ocher or Raw SIenna Alizarin Crimson Ultramarine Blue Aureolin yellow because Chrome Yellow don’t exist anymore! Burnt Sienna and Burnt Umber Lampblack Light Red Brushes I used some brushes here that I normally seldom use. The flat oxhair brushes are made for lettersetting art. I usually have two red sable brushes a 6 and a 12 Da Vince Maestro Tobolski Kolinsky Three W&N Squirrel wash brushes I used them a lot so I cannot see the size anymore I have a huge Squirrel brush I seldom use and that is a size 10, so my guess would be I have a 2, 4 and 6 size squirrel brush. Also found under Petit Gris Blue Squirrel brushes are the best, but also the most expensive! http://www.winsornewton.com/uk/shop/brushes/water-colour/professional-water-colour-squirrel-brushes/pure-squirel-pointed-wash-brush-pure-squirrel-pointed-wash-brushes-size-10-brush-5250310 And some riggers for detail, size 0, 1 and 4 W&N Sceptre Gold Paper I use a variety of papers, but in most cases StCuthbertsmill paper, like Bockingford, Millford and Saunders Waterford. when I do a style I try to use the painters choice! (when available)

Fritz Thaulow: A collection of 157 paintings (HD)

Fritz Thaulow: A collection of 157 paintings (HD) Description: "Norwegian painter Frits Thaulow was born in 1847 and traveled throughout Europe. Though famous for his landscape painting, he is also known for combining Realism and Impressionism in his work. Born in a small town in Norway, Frits Thaulow was the son of a wealthy chemist. His father’s money gave him the chance to work with some of the leading artists of his time. Thaulow worked with several tutors and painters to perfect his art. Early in his career, Thaulow studied maritime art and planned to work in the field, but he later found himself interested in landscape art. After traveling between Norway and France for several years, Thaulow made the permanent move to France, where he lived and worked for the last few years of his life. Thaulow moved to Paris early in his career and worked on a number of paintings. Though Realism was popular in Norway, Paris was the center of the Impressionist movement. When he attempted to paint Impressionist landscapes, he found himself incorporating realistic elements from his childhood. Art historians now often regard the artist’s work as a combination of Realist and Impressionist elements. Those elements are clear inHorses Watering at the Bridge at Montreiul sur Mer. The interesting lines and pale color choices are clearly the work of an Impressionist, while the realistic look of the horses and the houses on the shore fall into the Realism movement. Another of his famous pieces is Summer Landscape with a Bridge at Beaulieu, which centered on a small creek. In 1880, Thaulow left Paris and returned to Norway, where he lived for more than a decade. While in France, he learned many Impressionist techniques that he later brought to his home country. Thaulow often focused on the landscapes and cities near his hometown. He completed a series of paintings of skiers on the slopes of a small town before moving back to Paris. Moving to France helped Thaulow expand his paintings to include French settings. He created the pieces The Battery and At Quimperle later in his career. Thaulow spent the last fourteen years of his life living in Paris and painting the French countryside as well as recreating memories from his home country. By combining elements of Realism and Impressionism in his landscapes, Thaulow created his own movement, and he’s responsible for introducing the Impressionist style to Norway." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com --- Thanks for all support!

Watercolour in the style of Edward Wesson

I saw a photo on Twitter, made by my good friend Claire Hill, so I asked if I could use it for a painting and Claire said yes have a go! The scene is excellent material to make a sort of Edward Wesson painting from. I admire Mr Wesson a lot and have almost all his books. I paint on a quarter sheet Bockingford 200lb made by StCuthbertsmil. Its really a nice paper to paint on! The 200Lb was specially made for Edward Wesson it seems, he painted on 140lb, but that goggled a bit so he asked the factory if they could make it heavier and they made it, and thats why we still have it today! The finished painting can be seen here on flickr https://flic.kr/p/252j3Qx Edward Wesson Colours used Raw SIenna Alizarin Crimson Ultramarine Blue Winsor Blue or Phtalo Blue New Gamboge Burnt Sienna and Burnt Umber Light Red I use Rembrandt pigments, I am sure Wesson used W&N or Daler Rowney! Brushes I used some brushes here that I normally seldom use. The flat oxhair brushes are made for lettersetting art. I usually have two red sable brushes a 6 and a 12 Da Vince Maestro Tobolski Kolinsky Three W&N Squirrel wash brushes I used them a lot so I cannot see the size anymore I have a huge Squirrel brush I seldom use and that is a size 10, so my guess would be I have a 2, 4 and 6 size squirrel brush. Also found under Petit Gris Blue Squirrel brushes are the best, but also the most expensive! http://www.winsornewton.com/uk/shop/brushes/water-colour/professional-water-colour-squirrel-brushes/pure-squirel-pointed-wash-brush-pure-squirrel-pointed-wash-brushes-size-10-brush-5250310 And some riggers for detail, size 0, 1 and 4 W&N Sceptre Gold Paper I use a variety of papers, but in most cases StCuthbertsmill paper, like Bockingford, Millford and Saunders Waterford. when I do a style I try to use the painters choice! (when available)

Tips on what makes a great painting, by an art dealer with twenty five years experience

There are certain elements to any painting that makes it work, learn the three elements that Dr. Mark Sublette looks for in every painting before he buys. The tricks of the trade are shared through this highly informative video, great for beginners to serious collectors. Website: https://www.medicinemangallery.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/medicinemangallery Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/medicinemangallery Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/art-dealer-diaries/id1384036101?mt=2 Tips on what makes a great painting, by an art dealer with twenty five years experience Today I want to talk about tips on what makes a great painting. Paintings come in a variety of types, design, and quality – some are great, some are terrible, and if you can't figure out what makes a great one from a terrible one, you've got to watch this video. You probably have all heard, “Oh, that guy has a great eye.” And what that means is that person that they're saying has a great eye understands the works of art and what makes something good or not. And pretty much having a great eye (means) you can learn a lot of the aspects by just seeing a ton of stuff and going to good galleries and museums, and seeing what's on the walls. Generally, they got there for a reason because the person who is making the decisions hopefully does have a good eye. This is what my eye tells me to look for when I'm looking at pieces of art, whether to buy, or in artists, to take in as a potential person for my stable. But, one is composition. The painting here to your right is a Maynard Dixon. Maynard Dixon had great composition, (it was) one of his strongest points. If you look at the piece, you can see that the tree is done just perfectly in the setting that you like, and see how the road kind of meanders into the distance. Everything about this works: with the tree and the way the mountains are on the back, and especially that road. This is very key to looking at a good painting. If the tree had been moved in a different position where it's jetted, it just doesn't flow. You have to feel a flow in a composition, and that's kind of what you look for. Two, is symmetry. Symmetry really, for me, refers to: did they get it right size-wise? Is the tree big enough in comparison to where it should be in the mountain? Is the road the right size, or is it off? And one of the things I look for: are the hands too big on a person or is the person's head out of proportion? Or, is the boat wrong compared to the water? Is the shadow incorrect? You know they have to get symmetry; they have to get this dimensionality on their pieces, especially if they're realism. It’s a little different in modern art, and I'll talk about that in another lecture, but it's very important that you look for symmetry. There's been many – a very important show that I've gone to that we, as dealers, or artists will come around, and we'll look at paintings and go, “Oh my gosh, they're giant people that are walking there,” because they just got the proportionality completely off to what they were doing against the landscape. So, it's very important. Make sure you look at that before you ever buy a painting. Three is color palette. Now: is it a pleasing color palette, or is it something that really just doesn't work for you? Part of this is personal and that's fine. Some people like bright colors (and) some people don't. These kinds of things are a little bit more on the subjective than objective (side), but what I like to look for: is it a pleasing mix? And more importantly, for me, does the artist have the same palette that I can always recognize? Because if I'm looking to buy a specific artist, let's say, Maynard Dixon, I want to know exactly what his color palette is. And I can tell on Dixon's, who I specialize in, from what time frame that painting is strictly by his color palette, because it changed over time – it went from a very bright to a little less bright to a flat. And that's okay, and artists do that, but I know that he was just in his transformation of how he saw his color in his color palette, and that's a very key thing. The final thing has to do with (and this is very interesting, and it may take you a little time to appreciate it) but actually brushstrokes. I can tell an incredible amount about artists by how they do their brush strokes. A very confident artist will leave just a single brush stroke each time. When they put their brush on that palette, mix the color, and put it on the canvas, they know where it's going, and I can tell that they knew where it was going. It's very distinctive where it's going...

Painting a Wave | Step One - Blocking In!

Andrew Tischler Blocks-in a wave in oils. The Blocking-in stage is one of the most vital steps in the painting process. It lays the groundwork for the rest of the painting, and sets our colours and tones in motion! Check out Andrew's top 3 tips in this video! CHECK OUT ANDREW TISCHLER'S FULL TUTORIALS: www.andrewtischler.com/shop/ Subscribe for EVEN MORE BONUS CONTENT www.andrewtischler.com/subscribe/ Follow Andrew Tischler on FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/AndrewTischlerArtist Follow Andrew Tischler on INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/andrew_tischler_artist Andrew Tischler paints with LANGRIDGE HANDMADE OILS: http://langridgecolours.com/stockists/ Check out ROSEMARY AND CO BRUSHES! https://www.rosemaryandco.com

Edward Seago: A collection of 77 paintings (HD)

Description: "Edward Seago enjoyed the position as one of the most popular British artists of the 20th century. He began painting at the age of seven when he was confined to his room with a heart condition. Later, fully recovered, he would study with Bernard Priestman.

He became a successful illustrator in the 1930's, working for, among others, England's poet laureate of the sea, John Masefield. After serving with the royal engineers in WWII, he would spend the remainder of his life painting and writing. He was an avid sailor which is evident in the accuracy and flavor of his sea paintings.

Exhibiting widely, his famous one man shows at Colnaghi's would usually sell out on the first day. People were known to line up by 6 am to secure the painting of their choice. Examination of Seago's work shows the influence of the Dutch 17th century school and British artists such as John Constable. His two greatest influences however were the French impressionist Eugene Boudin and American painter James McNeil Whistler."

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