Vipp Shelter tiny prefab as precise industrial-era appliance

author Kirsten Dirksen   3 год. назад
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Artist builds his Savannah studio with shipping containers

Architect, artist, designer Julio Garcia had been designing plans for shipping container homes for a decade before he found the perfect place to build one: on a long, narrow stretch of his property in Savannah, Georgia. “I’m a big believer we should be adapting to the environment… I remember walking out and looking at the yard and thinking oh my god the land is calling for this linear design.” He picked up two 40 foot shipping containers from the Port of Savannah and, thanks to much advance planning, he was able to install them without removing one tree from his property. He offset the two boxes, cut out the interior container walls and added I-beams, a shed roof and clerestory windows in the center to provide plenty of daylighting. “There’s nothing worse than feeling like you’re inside a container so in the design we had to address that. I’ve been in a couple of projects and they don’t function very well and you’re like, ‘Oh, I still feel like I’m in a metal box’.” Garcia believes containers can make for affordable homes: “you could put up a structure like this for about 50K”, but much of the interior was salvaged from other job sites (i.e. the drywall and the kitchen). His Price Street Projects creates plans that are “almost do-it-yourself plans” for shipping container homes and he has installed commercial container spaces, but he’s a big believer that the site should determine the design. http://pricestreetprojects.com/ Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/artist-builds-his-savannah-studio-with-shipping-containers

Wikkelhouse: pick your modular segments & click them together

After a couple decades creating theater sets in Amsterdam, Oep Schilling and his company of makers Fiction Factory, put their CNC expertise and resources into building a prefab tiny house, using cardboard as the main structural element. Relying on a proprietary machine that can wrap corrugated sheets around a mold, they could create high strength cardboard that serves as both support and insulation. The “Wikkelhouse”, or “wrap house”, is a truly customizable home composed of 5-meter-square (53-square-foot) modules that click together to create any-sized structure. The 1.2-metre-deep segments (3.9 feet) are first built up from 24 layers of cardboard moulded around a house-shaped frame. Once “printed”, the basic units can be customized: cut with one or two spherical windows, kitted out as a bathroom, a kitchen or even a narrow bunk room or two or three can be combined to create larger rooms. Schilling says 20% of the orders have been for 8 segment shelters (often for nature cabins), though they have sold a lot of 4, 5 and 6 unit structures as well. “I hope to sell a three because I like it really tiny,” he explains. “Three could work, but it's a bit like a hotel room, but of course you have the sky, you have a garden. I've lived in smaller spaces, compared to a caravan this is like a villa." https://www.wikkelhouse.com/ https://faircompanies.com/videos/wikkelhouse-pick-your-modular-segments-click-them-together/

Remarkable Discovery Underground At Abandoned Hydraulic Mine

We don’t often do videos on hydraulic mines and that is simply because there aren’t many of them... This is mostly due to hydraulic mines being enormous operations with few places where the conditions are right for them to have existed. They don’t end up on the environmentally friendly list of mining techniques either, but the process is interesting (at least to me) nevertheless. My exploring buddy, Mr. McBride, (his YouTube channel is Adit Addicts) located this sluice tunnel on our first visit to this site a couple of years ago. At that time, we met the owner of the mine and accompanying ghost town (well, almost a ghost town) who invited us to look around. We weren’t properly equipped to explore the tunnel at that time and also had Mr. McBride’s daughters with us. So, we saved this one for another trip. While I was editing the video, I realized that many are probably not very familiar with the history I’m discussing and the terms I’m throwing around. So, I’ll take a crack at explaining hydraulic mining as seen in this video: Many millions of years ago, large rivers ran through this area. These rivers ran through areas that contained rich gold deposits. As today, when erosion released the gold in the rocks, the gold would tumble down into the rivers or be washed into them. Gold – being heavy - would slowly sink down through the sand, gravel and mud in the river channel, accumulating on the bedrock beneath the river. Eventually, volcanic eruptions killed these ancient rivers, burying them deep under ash and lava flows. Millions of years later, after the early “Gold Rush” miners had picked the easy gold from California’s modern rivers and streams, they started trying to locate the source of the gold they had been finding. It wasn’t long before they started heading beneath the earth, soon encountering river gravel hundreds of feet underground. This fabulously rich gravel set off a stampede to locate all of the ancient river channels playing host to placer gold. Countless underground placer mines sprang into existence to bore their way into mountains, desperately seeking ancient river channels. For those with the means, hydraulic mining offered access to the underground placers on a massive scale… Water was diverted from a source above the hydraulic mine into a series of pipes leading to the site that the miners wished to work. The water (flowing downhill) was run through an increasingly small series of pipes (building up pressure in the increasingly confined space) until it exited from a small nozzle known as a “monitor.” By this point, the water was practically exploding out of the nozzle as it was under tremendous pressure. This roaring jet of water smashed into the sides of hills and mountains like a giant hammer and swiftly washed away anything it hit. The process soon removed the overburden, exposing the ancient river channels the miners were after. With the volume of water flowing from the monitor, everything being knocked loose was washed down into ditches that then dropped into drain tunnels (as seen in this video). The sand, mud and gravel the gold is mixed in with came cascading into the series of large sluice boxes lining the tunnels. The riffles embedded in the sluice boxes would snag the heavy gold, which naturally sinks to the bottom, while the lighter mud, gravel and sand would simply flow over the riffles and out of the tunnel into the creeks and rivers below (there’s another story there). Periodically, the roaring water monitors would be switched off and the miners would then walk along the sluice boxes, scooping up the gold trapped behind the riffles (often with the assistance of mercury). The hydraulic mines took a lot of work to set up and took a lot of capital to do so, but they took out a LOT of gold. ***** All of these videos are uploaded in HD, so adjust those settings to ramp up the quality! It really does make a difference. You can see the gear that I use for mine exploring here: https://bit.ly/2wqcBDD You can click here for my full playlist of abandoned mines: https://goo.gl/TEKq9L Thanks for watching! ***** Growing up in California’s “Gold Rush Country” made it easy to take all of the history around us for granted. However, abandoned mines have a lot working against them – nature, vandals, scrappers and various government agencies… The old prospectors and miners that used to roam our lonely mountains and toil away deep underground are disappearing quickly as well. These losses finally caught our attention and we felt compelled to make an effort to document as many of the ghost towns and abandoned mines that we could before that colorful niche of our history is gone forever. I hope you’ll join us on these adventures! #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines #UndergroundMineExploring

10 SHIPPING CONTAINER HOMES | THE FUTURE OF HOME DESIGN

Shipping container homes are the latest craze. Here's our list of 10 shipping container homes | the future of home design. Check out our most popular playlists! ⭐ https://goo.gl/KdumQF Connect with us on YouTube! 😀 https://goo.gl/fqrncD Subscribe to Minds Eye Design! 🔔 https://goo.gl/S8IpFj Check out our video collection! 👈 https://goo.gl/UXobsF Featured Shipping Container homes ⭐ # 10 Casa Incubo www.mariajosetrejos.com # 9 Eco-Friendly Crossbox House www.cgarchitect.com # 8 Port-A-Bach Shipping Container Home www.atelierworkshop.com/port-a-bach # 7 Green On Main www.demariadesign.com # 6 Six Oaks Shipping Container Residence www.modulus.com # 5 Mojave Desert Shipping Container Home www.ecotechdesign.com # 4 Solar-Powered House Lindau www.k-m-architektur.com # 3 Cliff-House www.a4ac.co.za/cliff-house # 2 REDONDO BEACH SHIPPING CONTAINER HOUSE www.demariadesign.com # 1 COLORFUL SAO PAULO SHIPPING CONTAINER RESIDENCE www.studiomk27.com.br Royalty Free Music 🎧 Buddha - Kontekst soundcloud.com/kontekstmusic Tonight - Sirens Song Sam Russell http://www.samrussell.co.uk MINDS EYE DESIGN SOCIAL MEDIA ✅ Google+ https://plus.google.com/+mindseyedesign YouTube https://youtube.com/mindseyedesign 10 SHIPPING CONTAINER HOMES | THE FUTURE OF HOME DESIGN #design #innovation #inventions #technology #mindseyevideo

Fluid NYC flat uses sliding furniture to create 3 rooms in 1

Russian architect Peter Kostelov and his artist wife, Olga Feshina, wanted private rooms to work from home in their aging New York City apartment so they tore down the interior walls and rebuilt the 700-square-foot space with not just a living room, kitchen, bathroom and master bedroom, but two flex spaces which serve for work and guests (via slide-out beds). With the help of Kostelov’s carpenter father Vladimir (who flew in from Russia to help) they used plywood to craft sliding tables, benches and beds, as well as cabinets, closets and some walls and ceiling finishes. “This is the biggest advantage of plywood: you can make shapes that are custom made… this is how you can save your budget and use as much space as you can." In Peter’s office- a plywood-covered cocoon-, he raised the bed to leave room for a table to slide underneath from the adjacent living room. Crafted from just one four-by-eight piece of plywood, it slides out of the wall and can be adjusted to serve as a table-for-two, dining for 12, a drafting space (for Peter) and fabric-cutting surface (for Olia). The matching plywood benches slide out to match and open for horizontal storage. In the kitchen, there’s a breakfast table that folds down from the brick wall, as well as two plywood cantilevered stools that appear fragile, but hold up to 330 pounds (thanks to the yacht hardware and long anchor pins). Peter's architecture: http://www.kostelov.ru/what/e_house_133.html Olga's art: http://www.olgafeshina.com

The Danish company VIPP (famous for its iconic 1939 wastebasket, now in the MOMA) has created a prefab tiny home designed down to the last detail (flashlight included). Their 592-square-foot “plug and play getaway” wasn’t designed to blend into nature, but to float above it; fifty thousand pounds of glass and steel serve as a frame for the surrounding landscape.

VIPP designer Morten Bo Jensen explains that the shelter wasn’t designed as a piece of architecture, but an industrial object. The prefab structure is built in a factory and the four modules are transported by truck to the site. The shelter can be constructed in 3 to 5 days using just bolts for the modules and 9,000 screws for the steel plates.

The small prefab can house 4 people: 2 on a daybed and 2 in a loft bedroom. The floor-to-ceiling glass walls slide open and closed with mechanical rollers, designed to move the 400 or 500-kilo doors with ease. “We kind of like this idea that you just grab it and slide it open,” explains Jensen, “instead of motorized solutions that would be more different from our philosophy of very mechanical products that just last for a long time.”

https://www.vipp.com/en/shelter/the-vipp-shelter/

Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/vipp-shelter-tiny-prefab-as-precise-industrial-era-appliance/

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