Vipp Shelter tiny prefab as precise industrial-era appliance

author Kirsten Dirksen   3 год. назад
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Artist builds his Savannah studio with shipping containers

Architect, artist, designer Julio Garcia had been designing plans for shipping container homes for a decade before he found the perfect place to build one: on a long, narrow stretch of his property in Savannah, Georgia. “I’m a big believer we should be adapting to the environment… I remember walking out and looking at the yard and thinking oh my god the land is calling for this linear design.” He picked up two 40 foot shipping containers from the Port of Savannah and, thanks to much advance planning, he was able to install them without removing one tree from his property. He offset the two boxes, cut out the interior container walls and added I-beams, a shed roof and clerestory windows in the center to provide plenty of daylighting. “There’s nothing worse than feeling like you’re inside a container so in the design we had to address that. I’ve been in a couple of projects and they don’t function very well and you’re like, ‘Oh, I still feel like I’m in a metal box’.” Garcia believes containers can make for affordable homes: “you could put up a structure like this for about 50K”, but much of the interior was salvaged from other job sites (i.e. the drywall and the kitchen). His Price Street Projects creates plans that are “almost do-it-yourself plans” for shipping container homes and he has installed commercial container spaces, but he’s a big believer that the site should determine the design. http://pricestreetprojects.com/ Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/artist-builds-his-savannah-studio-with-shipping-containers

Transformer CNC cabin by a lake as father-son work dialogue

Daniel Yudchitz and his father, Bill, are both architects who took their love of craft, cabins and Swiss precision in architecture (e.g. Peter Zumthor) and created a CNC-cut cabin crafted to a fraction of an inch. The home is built with interlocking structural panels and can be disassembled. In fact, the father/son team built most of it in their parking lot, moved it and completed the build on the grounds of a state fair before moving it once again to its final resting place on their property on Lake Superior (in far north Wisconsin near Bayfield). The furniture was built to interlock and morph from table and benches into a disabled-accessible bed. Revelations Architecture: http://www.revarch.com/ Drone footage: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtHxXQT1icYEEt-O1d1aQuw Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/transformer-cnc-cabin-by-a-lake-as-a-father-son-work-dialogue/

Wikkelhouse: pick your modular segments & click them together

After a couple decades creating theater sets in Amsterdam, Oep Schilling and his company of makers Fiction Factory, put their CNC expertise and resources into building a prefab tiny house, using cardboard as the main structural element. Relying on a proprietary machine that can wrap corrugated sheets around a mold, they could create high strength cardboard that serves as both support and insulation. The “Wikkelhouse”, or “wrap house”, is a truly customizable home composed of 5-meter-square (53-square-foot) modules that click together to create any-sized structure. The 1.2-metre-deep segments (3.9 feet) are first built up from 24 layers of cardboard moulded around a house-shaped frame. Once “printed”, the basic units can be customized: cut with one or two spherical windows, kitted out as a bathroom, a kitchen or even a narrow bunk room or two or three can be combined to create larger rooms. Schilling says 20% of the orders have been for 8 segment shelters (often for nature cabins), though they have sold a lot of 4, 5 and 6 unit structures as well. “I hope to sell a three because I like it really tiny,” he explains. “Three could work, but it's a bit like a hotel room, but of course you have the sky, you have a garden. I've lived in smaller spaces, compared to a caravan this is like a villa." https://www.wikkelhouse.com/ https://faircompanies.com/videos/wikkelhouse-pick-your-modular-segments-click-them-together/

40ft Shipping Containers Transformed Into Amazing Off-Grid Family Home

This amazing small home has been built using two 40ft high cube shipping containers, slightly of-set from one another to create a stunning, off-the-grid family home. Become a Living Big Patron: https://www.patreon.com/livingbig Feeling inspired to downsize after watching tiny home and small house design videos online, this couple decided to take the plunge into designing and building a shipping container home for their family to reduce their expenses and be able to dedicate more time to the things that really matter. You can find our more about this tiny home on our website: http://www.livingbiginatinyhouse.com/off-grid-twin-40ft-shipping-container-home/ This off-grid container home is completely solar powered, with a huge solar array producing more than enough power for the small house. It's water is collected from a nearby bore. Otto Engineering: http://www.ottoengineering.co.nz/ Follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/livingbiginatinyhouse/ Follow us on Twitter: @TinyHouseNZ Follow us on Instagram: @livingbiginatinyhouse Please subscribe for more videos on tiny houses, DIY, design, and sustainable, off-grid living. Music in this video: http://www.youtube.com/brycelangston 'Living Big in a Tiny House' © 2018 Zyia Pictures Ltd

Container Build Group - Luxury Homes

The Danish company VIPP (famous for its iconic 1939 wastebasket, now in the MOMA) has created a prefab tiny home designed down to the last detail (flashlight included). Their 592-square-foot “plug and play getaway” wasn’t designed to blend into nature, but to float above it; fifty thousand pounds of glass and steel serve as a frame for the surrounding landscape.

VIPP designer Morten Bo Jensen explains that the shelter wasn’t designed as a piece of architecture, but an industrial object. The prefab structure is built in a factory and the four modules are transported by truck to the site. The shelter can be constructed in 3 to 5 days using just bolts for the modules and 9,000 screws for the steel plates.

The small prefab can house 4 people: 2 on a daybed and 2 in a loft bedroom. The floor-to-ceiling glass walls slide open and closed with mechanical rollers, designed to move the 400 or 500-kilo doors with ease. “We kind of like this idea that you just grab it and slide it open,” explains Jensen, “instead of motorized solutions that would be more different from our philosophy of very mechanical products that just last for a long time.”

https://www.vipp.com/en/shelter/the-vipp-shelter/

Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/vipp-shelter-tiny-prefab-as-precise-industrial-era-appliance/

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