Raphael: A collection of 65 sketches & etchings (HD)

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Raphael: A collection of 168 paintings (HD)

Raphael: A collection of 168 paintings (HD) Description: "Raphael, born Raffaello Sanzio, was crowned the "Prince of Painters" by Giorgio Vasari, a sixteenth-century biographer of artists. From his father, Raphael learned painting; in his native Urbino, he experienced intellectual court life. A year after his father's sudden death, Raphael entered the workshop of Urbino's leading painter at age twelve and quickly surpassed his master. By the age of twenty-one, Raphael had moved to Florence, where he embraced the works of Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci. In Florence, his many paintings of the Madonna and Child display his characteristic human warmth, serenity, and sublimely perfect figures. Raphael's art epitomized the High Renaissance qualities of harmony and ideal beauty. In four years Raphael's fame led to a summons to Rome from Pope Julius II. As painter to the papal court, his work met with high praise, and he established himself as the most favored artist in Rome. He was commissioned to paint portraits, devotional subjects, and the Pope's private rooms; he also designed tapestries. Raphael was soon placed in charge of all papal projects involving architecture, paintings, decoration, and the preservation of antiquities. His untimely death at the age of thirty-seven, Vasari said, "plunged into grief the entire papal court"; the Pope, who "wept bitterly when he died, had intended making him a Cardinal." " Feel free to subscribe!

Leonardo da Vinci: A collection of 119 sketches (HD)

Leonardo da Vinci: A collection of 119 sketches (HD) Description: "Da Vinci was one of the great creative minds of the Italian Renaissance, hugely influential as an artist and sculptor but also immensely talented as an engineer, scientist and inventor. Leonardo da Vinci was born on 15 April 1452 near the Tuscan town of Vinci, the illegitimate son of a local lawyer. He was apprenticed to the sculptor and painter Andrea del Verrocchio in Florence and in 1478 became an independent master. In about 1483, he moved to Milan to work for the ruling Sforza family as an engineer, sculptor, painter and architect. From 1495 to 1497 he produced a mural of 'The Last Supper' in the refectory of the Monastery of Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan. Da Vinci was in Milan until the city was invaded by the French in 1499 and the Sforza family forced to flee. He may have visited Venice before returning to Florence. During his time in Florence, he painted several portraits, but the only one that survives is the famous 'Mona Lisa' (1503-1506). In 1506, da Vinci returned to Milan, remaining there until 1513. This was followed by three years based in Rome. In 1517, at the invitation of the French king Francis I, Leonardo moved to the Château of Cloux, near Amboise in France, where he died on 2 May 1519. The fame of Da Vinci's surviving paintings has meant that he has been regarded primarily as an artist, but the thousands of surviving pages of his notebooks reveal the most eclectic and brilliant of minds. He wrote and drew on subjects including geology, anatomy (which he studied in order to paint the human form more accurately), flight, gravity and optics, often flitting from subject to subject on a single page, and writing in left-handed mirror script. He 'invented' the bicycle, airplane, helicopter, and parachute some 500 years ahead of their time. If all this work had been published in an intelligible form, da Vinci's place as a pioneering scientist would have been beyond dispute. Yet his true genius was not as a scientist or an artist, but as a combination of the two: an 'artist-engineer'. His painting was scientific, based on a deep understanding of the workings of the human body and the physics of light and shade. His science was expressed through art, and his drawings and diagrams show what he meant, and how he understood the world to work." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com --- Thanks for all support!

How Rembrandt Made His Etchings

Alexander Massouras demonstrates how the techniques behind some of history’s greatest prints remain unchanged — almost 400 years on. Renowned for his work in the medium, Rembrandt came to be recognised as one of the most accomplished printmakers of all time, producing works in intricate detail. ‘The lines follow the contours of what he depicts,’ comments Massouras, citing the individually-rendered hairs on a work such as Old Bearded Man Looking Down. ‘That detail is facilitated by etching.’ Read more at http://www.christies.com/features/Alexander-Massouras-demonstrates-how-Rembrandt-made-his-greatest-works-7517-3.aspx -- Subscribe to Christie's YouTube: http://goo.gl/Vmh7Hf Sign up to Christie's Weekly: https://goo.gl/kc8qpV Follow Christie's on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Christies Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChristiesInc Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christiesinc Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.co.uk/christiesinc

Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer Exhibition at The Met 2017 - 2018

What makes this exhibition s so special is not the fact that Italy has sent us Michelangelo’s statues for the first time since The 1964 World’s Fair. It’s not the fact that his first painting is on display. It’s the drawings—stupid. The fact that you can see almost all of Michelangelo’s drawings in one place is enough to get you to The Met. Yes, most people think that drawings are boring. How many of you have drawings in your home? In his younger years Michelangelo mostly drew to plan larger projects. In his later years he drew for the sake of drawing. There are many works here that are finished pieces of art—not stepping stones for painting and sculpture. What is also extraordinary is the fact that there is a Michelangelo cartoon on display. A cartoon is based on the Italian word cartoni, meaning heavy paper. A cartoon would be a design for a fresco. Pin pricks are put into the outline. When the cartoon is held up against the wall, a small sack of charcoal is pounded against it. This leaves an outline for the artist to follow. The cartoon for the fresco of The Crucifixion of Saint Peter in The Pauline Chapel in The Vatican is on display and you can see pin holes for the dusting of charcoal. Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475–1564), a towering genius in the history of Western art, is the subject of this once-in-a-lifetime exhibition. During his long life, Michelangelo was celebrated for the excellence of his disegno, the power of drawing and invention that provided the foundation for all the arts. For his mastery of drawing, design, sculpture, painting, and architecture, he was called Il Divino ("the divine one") by his contemporaries. His powerful imagery and dazzling technical virtuosity transported viewers and imbued all of his works with a staggering force that continues to enthrall us today. This exhibition presents a stunning range and number of works by the artist: 133 of his drawings, three of his marble sculptures, his earliest painting, his wood architectural model for a chapel vault, as well as a substantial body of complementary works by other artists for comparison and context. Among the extraordinary international loans are the complete series of masterpiece drawings he created for his friend Tommaso de' Cavalieri and a monumental cartoon for his last fresco in the Vatican Palace. Selected from 50 public and private collections in the United States and Europe, the exhibition examines Michelangelo's rich legacy as a supreme draftsman and designer.

Clarence Gagnon: A collection of 135 works (HD)

Clarence Gagnon: A collection of 135 works (HD) Description: "Clarence Alphonse Gagnon was a painter, draughtsman, engraver and illustrator who was born in Montreal on November 8, 1881. From 1897 to 1900, Gagnon studied drawing and painting under William Brymner at the Art Association of Montreal. In 1904, Gagnon left for Paris to work in the studio of Jean-Paul Laurens at the Académie Julian. He was able to distinguished himself early in his career by the fine quality of his engravings. Gagnon won a gold medal at the St. Louis Exhibition in 1904 and an honourable mention at the Salon des artistes français in Paris in 1905. From 1909 to 1914, Gagnon moved between Canada, France, and Norway; always working up the sketches he had made in Quebec. Gagnon became a member of the Royal Society of Canada and in 1910, became an associate member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts and a full member in 1922. In 1923, he received the Trevor Prize of the Salmagundi Club of New York. Between 1924 and 1936, Gagnon spent time in Paris and traveled throughout Europe. It was during this period that he illustrated a number of books, including Rouquette's, Le grand silence blanc (1929) and the deluxe edition of Louis Hémon's Maria Chapdelaine (1933), a story that celebrated Canadian frontier life. Upon his return to Quebec in 1936, the Université de Montréal awarded him an honorary doctorate. Clarence Gagnon died in Montreal on January 5, 1942. He was sixty-one years old." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com SUPPORT MY WORK AT: https://www.patreon.com/LearnFromMasters LIST OF ARTISTS already posted on LearnFromMasters: https://goo.gl/hri4HE --- Thank you so much for your support!

Raphael: A collection of 65 sketches & etchings (HD)

Description: "Raphael, born Raffaello Sanzio, was crowned the "Prince of Painters" by Giorgio Vasari, a sixteenth-century biographer of artists. From his father, Raphael learned painting; in his native Urbino, he experienced intellectual court life. A year after his father's sudden death, Raphael entered the workshop of Urbino's leading painter at age twelve and quickly surpassed his master.

By the age of twenty-one, Raphael had moved to Florence, where he embraced the works of Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci. In Florence, his many paintings of the Madonna and Child display his characteristic human warmth, serenity, and sublimely perfect figures. Raphael's art epitomized the High Renaissance qualities of harmony and ideal beauty.

In four years Raphael's fame led to a summons to Rome from Pope Julius II. As painter to the papal court, his work met with high praise, and he established himself as the most favored artist in Rome. He was commissioned to paint portraits, devotional subjects, and the Pope's private rooms; he also designed tapestries. Raphael was soon placed in charge of all papal projects involving architecture, paintings, decoration, and the preservation of antiquities. His untimely death at the age of thirty-seven, Vasari said, "plunged into grief the entire papal court"; the Pope, who "wept bitterly when he died, had intended making him a Cardinal." "

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