Ferdinand Hodler: A collection of 192 paintings (HD)

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Sidney Richard Percy: A collection of 152 paintings (HD)

Sidney Richard Percy: A collection of 152 paintings (HD) Description: "Sidney Richard Percy was a 19th-century British landscape painter. Rendered in Naturalist style, his Victorian landscapes often feature a central Thames River framed by meadows, mountains, and sparse foliage. Although Percy frequently included rural figures and animals in his compositions, his focus was on capturing the beauty and atmospheric presence of the empty countryside. He traveled extensively throughout the United Kingdom, drawing inspiration from locations in Wales, Yorkshire, and the Scottish Highlands, among others. Born in London, England on March 22, 1822, he was notably a member of the Barnes School family of artists, which included , George Augustus Williams, and Henry John Boddington. Percy rose to significant popularity despite receiving no formal training. He exhibited at the Royal Academy, and his work was collected by distinguished socialites including Queen Victoria herself. He later suffered an amputation from a horse-riding accident, and died in his home of Sutton, Surrey on April 13, 1886 at the age of 65." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com SUPPORT MY WORK AT: https://www.patreon.com/LearnFromMasters LIST OF ARTISTS already posted on LearnFromMasters: https://goo.gl/hri4HE --- Thank you so much for your support!

Ivan Shishkin: A collection of 352 paintings (HD)

Ivan Shishkin: A collection of 352 paintings (HD) Description: "The works of this outstanding artist enjoy vast popularity in Russia; the best of them have become the classics of Russian landscape painting. During 40 years of his artistic activity Ivan Shishkin produced hundreds of paintings, thousands of studies and drawings and a large number of engravings. For contemporaries, Shishkin’s personality embodied Russian nature itself; they called him “forest tzar”, “old pine tree”, and “lonely oak”. Ivan Ivanovich Shishkin was born into the family of a merchant. His father, a self-made and broad-minded man, after long hesitations, supported his son's desire to become an artist. In 1852-1856, Shishkin studied in the Moscow School of Painting and Sculpture, in 1856-1860, he continued his studies in St. Petersburg, in the Academy of Arts. He made rapid progress and got all the awards the Academy offered. Having received a Major Gold Medal for two pictures with the same name View of Valaam Island. Kukko. (1860) and an Academy grant for studies abroad, Shishkin spent 3 years (1862-1865) in Germany, Switzerland, Czech, France, Belgium and Holland. Gradually he got disappointed in his foreign teachers and European authorities in landscape painting. Now he felt free and independent and longed to return home, to Russia. During his stay abroad Shishkin engaged in lithography and etching. His numerous pen drawings caught the eye of the Dusseldorf public and critics by their virtuoso hatching and filigree treatment of detail. In 1865, Shishkin painted his View near Dusseldorf for which he was awarded the title of Academician and which was shown at the 1867 World Fair in Paris. In 1865, he returned to Russia and settled in St. Petersburg, where he joined the Itinerants’ Society of Traveling Exhibitions (Peredvizhniki). One of his first masterpieces Noon in the Neighbourhood of Moscow (1869) critics called “song of joy”. He always preferred to draw daytime scenes, full of sunlight and life. Pine Forest in Viatka Province (1872), Rye (1878), Path in a Forest (1880), Oaks (1887), Coniferous Forest. Sunny Day. (1895). His scrupulous reproduction of nature stood in sharp contrast to the academic canons of landscape painting. For his loving approach to detail some critics called his works colored pictures, which lack of life. But despite such attention to details Shishkin’s paintings do not fall apart, but give full and finished impression. Shichkin had a troubled private life, twice he fell in love and married and twice his wives died. His sons also died. But never Shishkin allowed his sorrows appear on his canvases. His last work is Mast-Tree Grove (1898). He died in his studio at the easel with newly begun canvas. Among the Russian landscape painters Shishkin was the staunchest and most consistent exponent of the materialistic aesthetics – to depict nature in all its pure, unadorned beauty. His role in Russian art did not lose its significance even in the years, which saw the appearance of splendid landscapes by Isaac Levitan, Valentin Serov and Constantin Korovin. Despite the fact that he espoused different aesthetic principles and advocated a different artistic system, Shishkin enjoyed an indisputable authority among young Russian painters of the late 19th century. The new generation did not fail to acknowledge him as a thoughtful and masterful portrayer of Russian nature." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com --- Thanks for all support!

Edmund Tarbell: A collection of 129 paintings (HD)

Edmund Tarbell: A collection of 129 paintings (HD) Description: "American painter, illustrator and teacher. He attended drawing lessons at the Normal Art School, Boston, MA, and art classes with W. A. G. Claus. From 1877 to 1880 he was apprenticed to a lithographic company in Boston. In 1879 Tarbell entered the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, where he was a pupil of Otto Grundmann (1844-90), a former student of Baron Hendrik Leys in Antwerp. In 1883 Tarbell left for Paris with his fellow student Frank W. Benson. Both Tarbell and Benson attended the Académie Julian, where they studied with Gustave Boulanger and Jules Lefčbvre. They travelled to Italy in 1884 and to Italy, Belgium, Germany and Brittany the following year. Tarbell returned to Boston in 1886. Initially after his return, Tarbell made a living from magazine illustration, teaching privately and painting portraits. In 1889 Tarbell and Benson took Grundmann's place at the Museum School. Tarbell was a popular teacher, whose prominence was so marked that his students were called 'Tarbellites'. His teaching methods were traditional and academic: he required his pupils to render casts before they were allowed to paint. His motto was 'Why not make it like?', a query that shows his dedication to the model. He was professor at the School until 1912. He had his first one-man show in 1891 in Boston. In 1893 he exhibited at the World Fair in Chicago. He had a big success at the World Fair in Paris in 1900. He was elected member of the National Academy in 1906. Between 1918 and 1926 he was director of the Corcoran School of Art in Washington." Feel free to subscribe!

HOW TO PAINT REALISTIC LANDSCAPE 1: Mountains in the mist painting tutorial iPad Pro + Apple Pencil

How to paint realistic mountain landscape made easy for beginners and intermediate artists, with a step by step guide. This painting tutorial was made using an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil in Procreate art app. Here I demonstrate how to draw and paint a mountain scene in Procreate. Using the Apple Pencil and iPad Pro I show you how I would construct this type of landscape painting. For more digital art tutorials please check out my playlists. HOW TO PAINT FIRE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dP5m_8FgkEw&list=PLeqxPJwwcz_RphrqOxDwjWVH5PlE1YhsN&index=1 HOW TO PAINT WATER: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3VyUXrEP4E&list=PLeqxPJwwcz_Ty7h6NvKWRfqTJV_r2QVAA&index=1&t=25s HOW TO PAINT SKIES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8hvTA47EJg&t=25s&index=1&list=PLeqxPJwwcz_RQqIzWlFwu471zf2j9LwLh Please visit my Patreon page to support and see more content. thank you :) https://www.patreon.com/jamesjulier music:- "Garden Music" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Tips on what makes a great painting, by an art dealer with twenty five years experience

There are certain elements to any painting that makes it work, learn the three elements that Dr. Mark Sublette looks for in every painting before he buys. The tricks of the trade are shared through this highly informative video, great for beginners to serious collectors. Website: https://www.medicinemangallery.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/medicinemangallery Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/medicinemangallery Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/art-dealer-diaries/id1384036101?mt=2 Tips on what makes a great painting, by an art dealer with twenty five years experience Today I want to talk about tips on what makes a great painting. Paintings come in a variety of types, design, and quality – some are great, some are terrible, and if you can't figure out what makes a great one from a terrible one, you've got to watch this video. You probably have all heard, “Oh, that guy has a great eye.” And what that means is that person that they're saying has a great eye understands the works of art and what makes something good or not. And pretty much having a great eye (means) you can learn a lot of the aspects by just seeing a ton of stuff and going to good galleries and museums, and seeing what's on the walls. Generally, they got there for a reason because the person who is making the decisions hopefully does have a good eye. This is what my eye tells me to look for when I'm looking at pieces of art, whether to buy, or in artists, to take in as a potential person for my stable. But, one is composition. The painting here to your right is a Maynard Dixon. Maynard Dixon had great composition, (it was) one of his strongest points. If you look at the piece, you can see that the tree is done just perfectly in the setting that you like, and see how the road kind of meanders into the distance. Everything about this works: with the tree and the way the mountains are on the back, and especially that road. This is very key to looking at a good painting. If the tree had been moved in a different position where it's jetted, it just doesn't flow. You have to feel a flow in a composition, and that's kind of what you look for. Two, is symmetry. Symmetry really, for me, refers to: did they get it right size-wise? Is the tree big enough in comparison to where it should be in the mountain? Is the road the right size, or is it off? And one of the things I look for: are the hands too big on a person or is the person's head out of proportion? Or, is the boat wrong compared to the water? Is the shadow incorrect? You know they have to get symmetry; they have to get this dimensionality on their pieces, especially if they're realism. It’s a little different in modern art, and I'll talk about that in another lecture, but it's very important that you look for symmetry. There's been many – a very important show that I've gone to that we, as dealers, or artists will come around, and we'll look at paintings and go, “Oh my gosh, they're giant people that are walking there,” because they just got the proportionality completely off to what they were doing against the landscape. So, it's very important. Make sure you look at that before you ever buy a painting. Three is color palette. Now: is it a pleasing color palette, or is it something that really just doesn't work for you? Part of this is personal and that's fine. Some people like bright colors (and) some people don't. These kinds of things are a little bit more on the subjective than objective (side), but what I like to look for: is it a pleasing mix? And more importantly, for me, does the artist have the same palette that I can always recognize? Because if I'm looking to buy a specific artist, let's say, Maynard Dixon, I want to know exactly what his color palette is. And I can tell on Dixon's, who I specialize in, from what time frame that painting is strictly by his color palette, because it changed over time – it went from a very bright to a little less bright to a flat. And that's okay, and artists do that, but I know that he was just in his transformation of how he saw his color in his color palette, and that's a very key thing. The final thing has to do with (and this is very interesting, and it may take you a little time to appreciate it) but actually brushstrokes. I can tell an incredible amount about artists by how they do their brush strokes. A very confident artist will leave just a single brush stroke each time. When they put their brush on that palette, mix the color, and put it on the canvas, they know where it's going, and I can tell that they knew where it was going. It's very distinctive where it's going...

Ferdinand Hodler: A collection of 192 paintings (HD)

Description: "Ferdinand Hodler, (born March 14, 1853, near Bern—died May 20, 1918, Geneva), one of the most important Swiss painters of the late 19th and early 20th century.

He was orphaned at the age of 12 and studied first at Thun under an artist who painted landscapes for tourists. After 1872, however, he worked in a more congenial atmosphere at Geneva, under Barthélémy Menn. By 1879, when Hodler settled in Geneva, he was producing massive, simplified portraits owing something to the French realist painter Gustave Courbet. By the mid-1880s, however, a tendency to self-conscious linear stylization was visible in his subject pictures, which dealt increasingly with the symbolism of youth and age, solitude, and contemplation, in such works as “Die Nacht” (1890; “The Night,” Kunstmuseum, Bern), which brought him acclaim throughout Europe. From this time his serious work can be divided between landscapes, portraits, and monumental figural compositions. The latter works present firmly drawn nudes who express Hodler’s mystical philosophy through grave, ritualized gestures. These pictures are notable for their strong linear and compositional rhythms and their clear, flat, decorative presentation."

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