Berthe Morisot: A collection of 302 works (HD)

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Mary Cassatt: A collection of 339 works (HD)

Mary Cassatt: A collection of 339 works (HD) Description: "Mary Stevenson Cassatt (1844–1926), born in Allegheny City (now part of Pittsburgh), Pennsylvania, spent her early years with her family in France and Germany. From 1860 to 1862, she studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. By 1865, she had convinced her parents to let her study in Paris, where she took private lessons from leading academic painter Jean-Léon Gérôme, copied works of the old masters, and went sketching. She stayed in Courance and Écouen and studied with Édouard Frère and Paul Soyer. In 1868, Cassatt’s painting The Mandolin Player (private collection) was accepted at the Paris Salon, the first time her work was represented there. After three-and-a-half years in France, the Franco-Prussian War interrupted Cassatt’s studies and she returned to Philadelphia in the late summer of 1870. Cassatt returned to Europe in 1871. She spent eight months in Parma, Italy, in 1872, studying the paintings of Correggio and Parmigianino and working with the advice of Carlo Raimondi, head of the department of engraving at the Parma Academy. In 1873, she visited Spain, Belgium, and Holland to study and copy the works of Velázquez, Rubens, and Hals. In June 1874, Cassatt settled in Paris, where she began to show regularly in the Salons, and where her parents and sister Lydia joined her in 1877. That same year, Edgar Degas invited her to join the group of independent artists later known as the Impressionists. The only American officially associated with the group, Cassatt exhibited in four of their eight exhibitions, in 1879, 1880, 1881, and 1886. Under their influence, Cassatt revised her technique, composition, and use of color and light, manifesting her admiration for the works of the French avant garde, especially Degas and Manet. Degas, her chief mentor, provided criticism of her work, offered advice on technique, and encouraged her experiments in printmaking. Like Degas, she was chiefly interested in figure compositions. During the late 1870s and early 1880s, the subjects of her works were her family (especially her sister Lydia), the theater, and the opera. Later she made a specialty of the mother and child theme, which she treated with warmth and naturalness in paintings, pastels, and prints. Cassatt’s role as an advisor to art collectors benefited many public and private collections in the United States. From her early days in Paris, she encouraged the collection of old masters and the French avant-garde. In 1901, she accompanied Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Havemeyer on a collecting trip in Italy and Spain. Cassatt had known Mrs. Havemeyer before her marriage. In 1873, she had encouraged the then seventeen-year-old Louisine Elder to buy a pastel by Degas, and the two women became close friends. Cassatt was eventually instrumental in shaping the Havemeyer collection, most of which is now in the Metropolitan Museum. Failing eyesight severely curtailed Cassatt’s work after 1900. She gave up printmaking in 1901, and in 1904 stopped painting. She spent most of the war years in Grasse and died in 1926 at her country home, Château de Beaufresne, at Mesnil-Theribus, Oise." --- SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com SUPPORT MY WORK AT: https://www.patreon.com/LearnFromMasters LIST OF ARTISTS already posted on LearnFromMasters: https://goo.gl/hri4HE --- Thank you so much for your support!

WORST Art Restoration Fails

Conservators or art restorers are considered the magicians of the art world. Over the course of time, paintings are bound to lose their original color, suffer damage and fade… and thanks to highly skilled conservators, we are able to restore these pieces back to their original glory. But sometimes, very rarely, these beautiful pieces get ruined by someone and the damage is irreversible. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 7 - Leave it to the experts Imagine a restoration being the reason that people quit their jobs? That’s what happened when experts saw this restoration of the Virgin and Child with St Anne. This painting was done by Leonardo da Vinci, and some experts quit their jobs in protest when they saw this version. As clearly seen, the painting is vastly lighter, as if this scenario took place on a sunny day. These experts claim that this is in complete contrast to Da Vinci’s vision. Although, how would we really know what was going through his head at the time of painting this masterpiece? 6 - A Whiter Shade of Pale There are very few portraits of Shakespeare in the world, and two were irreversibly ruined. The team in charge of restoring the painting assumed they were removing an outer layer of paint to reveal the original paintings underneath. Turns out, they ended up wiping away the original artwork. It’s believed the paintings were altered during Shakespeare’s lifetime and that the artists back then did it purposefully to show how he had aged. So, when the top layer was removed, underneath was a younger-looking Shakespeare. Currently, the National Portrait Gallery is deciding whether or not to clean up one of their portraits of Shakespeare, which hasn’t been touched up in 400-years! 5 - Not your best look Head on over to Russia and you’ll find quite a large number of Lenin statues around, but none quite like this one. In Krasnodar Krai one such statue underwent a bit of restoration. It turned out like a bit of a monkey, and remained that way until photos circulated online in 2016, and only after that was he given a make-over to return him to his former self. 4 - A change is as good as a holiday You would think that taking something that is already in ruins and giving it a make-over would automatically improve it – but not in this case. Not a piece of art per se, but the El Castillo de Matrera is a historical castle from 9th century Spain. This National Monument was damaged by intense rain in 2013, so a project was undertaken to restore it. The end result looks like the original bricks have been stuck on a grey concrete building. It was called a “heritage massacre” and many people were left deeply shocked by the outcome, although ironically – the building was nominated for an Architizer A+ Award and actually won the people’s choice! 3 - Quite the artist A restoration project that made headlines globally took place in a 16th-century Spanish Church and the artist in question was Cecilia Giménez. The 81-year old lady quickly received the nickname Ecce Mono, which means Behold the Monkey, because she transformed a 19th century fresco of Jesus into something closely resembling a monkey. She thought she was doing the Church a favor, and initially it was anything but – however, give it a bit of a time and she ended up doing the sleep town a huge favor. Misericordia has received thousands of visitors through their doors, all hoping to catch a glance of her artwork and they’ve all left some wonderful donations, very much needed by the Church. 2 - World’s Worst The restoration of the Great Wall of China has been called the “World’s Worst Restoration”, although after seeing our previous entry – it’s quite possible this restoration project has lost its number 1 spot. It’s no secret that the Great Wall of China is slowly decaying, and a number of years ago a task team set out to reconstruct a certain section of it, which they did – using concrete! The Chinese slammed this terrible job online, and many promises were made to ensure nothing like that ever happened again! 1 - More often, they just get it right After seeing all the disastrous efforts of restoration, let’s have a look at one that is mind-blowingly amazing! The Adoration of the Shepherds, by the Italian Renaissance master Sebastiano del Piombo, was in total ruins. It really looked like there was no hope for it. The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge commissioned this restoration, and it took them 10-years to complete! The painting dates back to 1511 – 1512, and if you see it today, it would be hard to imagine it as this old painting that almost didn’t make it.

Berthe Morisot

Vie de cette artiste peintre unique à cette époque...Ses œuvres les plus marquantes, et sa détermination de la création des expositions indépendantes avec: Monet.. Pissarro.. Manet... Renoir...

Vasily Polenov: A collection of 271 works (HD)

Vasily Polenov: A collection of 271 works (HD) Description: "Russian painter. He began a systematic study of drawing in 1856, first with the landscape painter Pavel Cherkasov (1834-1900), then from 1859 to 1861 with Pavel Chistyakov (1832-1919). He also took lessons with Chistyakov, whom he considered his most important teacher, in 1871 and early 1872, after finishing his academic course. From 1863 to 1871 Polenov studied at the St Petersburg Academy of Art, where he met members of the progressive wing of the Russian artistic intelligentsia, and occasionally in the faculty of law at St Petersburg University. The classical education he received at home, his academic training and lessons with Chistyakov led Polenov towards an 'exalted' history painting, although he personally inclined towards landscape. This dualism remained in Polenov's work for the duration, and not until the late 1880s and early 1890s did he achieve a stable relationship between the two forms. The whole of his student career and the initial postgraduate, scholarship period was largely taken up with historical works: from academic compositions, for example the Resurrection of Jairus's Daughter (1871; Pskov, Museum of History), for which he received the Grand Gold Medal and a travel bursary (in Germany and Italy, 1872-73, and France, 1873-76), to numerous pictures and sketches on subjects from antiquity and medieval history, executed in France or shortly after his departure from there, under the perceptible influence of Paul Delaroche (e.g. The Master's Right, 1874; Moscow, Tretyakov Gallery). At the same time he produced his first independent works, in the 1860s and early 1870s: landscapes in the surroundings of the Imochentsy estate in Karelia (e.g. Mountains, 1870; Moscow Tretyakov Gallery), and landscape studies and pictures executed from nature in Normandy in 1874 (e.g. Fishing Boat, Etretat; Moscow, Tretyakov Gallery). In 1876 he became an Academician. In 1882-95 he was professor of landscape painting at the School of Art in Moscow. He became interested in depictions of Christ and philosophical and religious questions. In 1905 he left the teaching staff of the Academy in protest against the massacre in St. Petersburg. In 1910-18 he managed the first folk-theatre in Moscow, and became active in the development of factory and village theatre." --- MUSIC: Kevin MacLeod - Drone in D Drone in D by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200044 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/c/LearnFromMasters?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnFromMasters/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+LearnFromMasters Contact: LearnFromMasters01@gmail.com SUPPORT MY WORK AT: https://www.patreon.com/LearnFromMasters (By donating at least 50$ you'll have acces to all artworks (JPEG files) collection already posted on this channel!) LIST OF ARTISTS already posted on LearnFromMasters: https://goo.gl/hri4HE --- Thank you so much for your support!

Matisse meets Picasso documentary (2002)

Compiling a half-century of unparalleled artistic dialogue, this program documents the complicated relationship between two indomitable personae: Henri Matisse, the serene, self-indulgent father figure, and Pablo Picasso, the eternal adolescent and fiery primitive. »»﴿───► See more on the Artists and Art Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIZqvqbtz9I3Awxq23UZKyGAzqzAJiUhN »»﴿───► See more on the Documentary Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIZqvqbtz9I0A1T78lAPpY0RN5oM9Gq5c Check out the Patreon rewards! https://www.patreon.com/ManufacturingIntellect The program employs archival photos and film clips, stunning images of painting and sculpture, and firsthand recollections of the Picasso and Matisse circles, illuminating the intersecting creative journeys of both artists. Françoise Gilot and Picasso’s son Claude shed light on the Spaniard’s formal reactions to—and admiration of—Matisse, while Jacqueline Matisse Monnier and Matisse biographer Hilary Spurling reciprocate.

Berthe Morisot: A collection of 302 works (HD)

Description: "Berthe Morisot (January 14, 1841 – March 2, 1895) was a French Impressionist painter.

Born in Bourges, Cher, France into a successful bourgeois family who encouraged her and her sister Edma Morisot in their exploration of art, she demonstrated the possibilities for women artists in avant-garde art movements at the end of the 19th century. Once Morisot settled on pursuing art, her family did not impede her career.

By age 20, she met and befriended the important landscape painter of the Barbizon school, Camille Corot, who introduced her to other artists and teachers. She took up plein air techniques and painted small pieces outdoors either as finished works or as studies for larger works completed in the studio.

Morisot's first acceptance in the Salon de Paris came in 1864 with two landscape paintings, and she continued to show regularly in the Salon until 1874, the year of the first impressionist exhibition.
She was acquainted with Edouard Manet from 1868, and in 1874 she married Eugene Manet, Edouard's younger brother. She convinced Manet to attempt plein air painting, and drew him into the circle of acquaintance of the painters who became known as the impressionists. However, he never considered himself an impressionist or agreed to show with the group.

Morisot, along with Camille Pissarro, was one of only two artists whose work exhibited in all of the original impressionist shows.

Like Mary Cassatt, during her lifetime, Berthe Morisot was relegated to the category of "feminine" artists because of their usual subject matter — women, children, and domestic scenes. However, as a doctrinaire impressionist, Morisot painted what she saw in her immediate, everyday life. As a woman securely in the "haute bourgeoisie" she saw domestic interiors, holiday spots, other women, and children. Without exception, her subject matter shows the equivalent of that of her impressionist colleagues. Edgar Degas, the dandy male bourgeois, painted rehearsals of the ballet, horse races, and nude women in apartments (rather than studios). Claude Monet painted his garden, his children, and his neighbor's haystacks. Female impressionists painted their social milieu in a way consistent with the impressionist approach to subject matter.

Berthe Morisot died in Paris and was interred in the Cimetière de Passy.

Today, her paintings can sell for more than $4 million."

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