Adelsteen Normann (1848-1918) A collection of paintings 4K Ultra HD

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Landscape oil painting in just 18 minutes wet on wet

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David Hockney - Painting 'November Tunnel'

MA degree project using footage of David Hockney painting plein-aire from blank canvas in the Yorkshire Wolds in 2006. Music composed by Anna Rusbatch. I claim no copyright for the visual footage from the DVD 'David Hockney - A Bigger Picture' - available on Amazon. Attribution to the filmmakers - Bruno Wollheim and Coluga Pictures. The original 'bonus' footage is 17 minutes in duration.

John Singer Sargent - Volume 2 - Landscapes - A collection of paintings 4K Ultra HD

John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) was an American expatriate artist, considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian era luxury. In 1879, at the age of 23, Sargent painted a portrait of teacher Carolus-Duran; the virtuoso effort met with public approval, and announced the direction his mature work would take. Its showing at the Paris Salon was both a tribute to his teacher and an advertisement for portrait commissions. Of Sargent's early work, Henry James wrote that the artist offered "the slightly 'uncanny' spectacle of a talent which on the very threshold of its career has nothing more to learn." After leaving Carolus-Duran's atelier, Sargent visited Spain. There he studied the paintings of Velázquez with a passion, absorbing the master's technique, and in his travels gathered ideas for future works. He was entranced with Spanish music and dance. The trip also re-awakened his own talent for music (which was nearly equal to his artistic talent), and which found visual expression in his early masterpiece El Jaleo (1882). Music would continue to play a major part in his social life as well, as he was a skillful accompanist of both amateur and professional musicians. Sargent became a strong advocate for modern composers, especially Gabriel Fauré. Trips to Italy provided sketches and ideas for several Venetian street scenes genre paintings, which effectively captured gestures and postures he would find useful in later portraiture. Upon his return to Paris, Sargent quickly received several portrait commissions. His career was launched. He immediately demonstrated the concentration and stamina that enabled him to paint with workman-like steadiness for the next twenty-five years. He filled in the gaps between commissions with many non-commissioned portraits of friends and colleagues. His fine manners, perfect French, and great skill made him a standout among the newer portraitists, and his fame quickly spread. He confidently set high prices and turned down unsatisfactory sitters. He mentored his friend Emil Fuchs who was learning to paint portraits in oils. During Sargent's long career, he painted more than 2,000 watercolors, roving from the English countryside to Venice to the Tyrol, Corfu, the Middle East, Montana, Maine, and Florida. Each destination offered pictorial stimulation and treasure. Even at his leisure, in escaping the pressures of the portrait studio, he painted with restless intensity, often painting from morning until night. His hundreds of watercolors of Venice are especially notable, many done from the perspective of a gondola. His colors were sometimes extremely vivid and as one reviewer noted, "Everything is given with the intensity of a dream." In the Middle East and North Africa Sargent painted Bedouins, goatherds, and fisherman. In the last decade of his life, he produced many watercolors in Maine, Florida, and in the American West, of fauna, flora, and native peoples. With his watercolors, Sargent was able to indulge his earliest artistic inclinations for nature, architecture, exotic peoples, and noble mountain landscapes. It is in some of his late works where one senses Sargent painting most purely for himself. His watercolors were executed with a joyful fluidness. He also painted extensively family, friends, gardens, and fountains. In watercolors, he playfully portrayed his friends and family dressed in Orientalist costume, relaxing in brightly lit landscapes that allowed for a more vivid palette and experimental handling than did his commissions (The Chess Game, 1906). His first major solo exhibit of watercolor works was at the Carfax Gallery in London in 1905. In 1909, he exhibited eighty-six watercolors in New York City, eighty-three of which were bought by the Brooklyn Museum. Evan Charteris wrote in 1927: To live with Sargent's watercolors is to live with sunshine captured and held, with the luster of a bright and legible world, 'the refluent shade' and 'the Ambient ardours of the noon.' Although not generally accorded the critical respect given Winslow Homer, perhaps America's greatest watercolorist, scholarship has revealed that Sargent was fluent in the entire range of opaque and transparent watercolor technique, including the methods used by Homer. John Singer Sargent - Volume 1 - https://youtu.be/N-H22PGlwYg John Singer Sargent - Volume 3, 4 & 5 - coming soon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Singer_Sargent#Watercolors Thank you, please subscribe for future videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gMk3w9hw8BbtqoUpEMKeg?sub_confirmation=1

Tips on what makes a great painting, by an art dealer with twenty five years experience

There are certain elements to any painting that makes it work, learn the three elements that Dr. Mark Sublette looks for in every painting before he buys. The tricks of the trade are shared through this highly informative video, great for beginners to serious collectors. Website: https://www.medicinemangallery.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/medicinemangallery Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/medicinemangallery Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/art-dealer-diaries/id1384036101?mt=2 Tips on what makes a great painting, by an art dealer with twenty five years experience Today I want to talk about tips on what makes a great painting. Paintings come in a variety of types, design, and quality – some are great, some are terrible, and if you can't figure out what makes a great one from a terrible one, you've got to watch this video. You probably have all heard, “Oh, that guy has a great eye.” And what that means is that person that they're saying has a great eye understands the works of art and what makes something good or not. And pretty much having a great eye (means) you can learn a lot of the aspects by just seeing a ton of stuff and going to good galleries and museums, and seeing what's on the walls. Generally, they got there for a reason because the person who is making the decisions hopefully does have a good eye. This is what my eye tells me to look for when I'm looking at pieces of art, whether to buy, or in artists, to take in as a potential person for my stable. But, one is composition. The painting here to your right is a Maynard Dixon. Maynard Dixon had great composition, (it was) one of his strongest points. If you look at the piece, you can see that the tree is done just perfectly in the setting that you like, and see how the road kind of meanders into the distance. Everything about this works: with the tree and the way the mountains are on the back, and especially that road. This is very key to looking at a good painting. If the tree had been moved in a different position where it's jetted, it just doesn't flow. You have to feel a flow in a composition, and that's kind of what you look for. Two, is symmetry. Symmetry really, for me, refers to: did they get it right size-wise? Is the tree big enough in comparison to where it should be in the mountain? Is the road the right size, or is it off? And one of the things I look for: are the hands too big on a person or is the person's head out of proportion? Or, is the boat wrong compared to the water? Is the shadow incorrect? You know they have to get symmetry; they have to get this dimensionality on their pieces, especially if they're realism. It’s a little different in modern art, and I'll talk about that in another lecture, but it's very important that you look for symmetry. There's been many – a very important show that I've gone to that we, as dealers, or artists will come around, and we'll look at paintings and go, “Oh my gosh, they're giant people that are walking there,” because they just got the proportionality completely off to what they were doing against the landscape. So, it's very important. Make sure you look at that before you ever buy a painting. Three is color palette. Now: is it a pleasing color palette, or is it something that really just doesn't work for you? Part of this is personal and that's fine. Some people like bright colors (and) some people don't. These kinds of things are a little bit more on the subjective than objective (side), but what I like to look for: is it a pleasing mix? And more importantly, for me, does the artist have the same palette that I can always recognize? Because if I'm looking to buy a specific artist, let's say, Maynard Dixon, I want to know exactly what his color palette is. And I can tell on Dixon's, who I specialize in, from what time frame that painting is strictly by his color palette, because it changed over time – it went from a very bright to a little less bright to a flat. And that's okay, and artists do that, but I know that he was just in his transformation of how he saw his color in his color palette, and that's a very key thing. The final thing has to do with (and this is very interesting, and it may take you a little time to appreciate it) but actually brushstrokes. I can tell an incredible amount about artists by how they do their brush strokes. A very confident artist will leave just a single brush stroke each time. When they put their brush on that palette, mix the color, and put it on the canvas, they know where it's going, and I can tell that they knew where it was going. It's very distinctive where it's going...

Gerhard Richter Painting: watch the master artist at work

The filmmaker exposes the notoriously secretive creative process of reclusive German artist Gerhard Richter in this fly-on-the-wall documentary, filmed over three years in the artist's Cologne studio. Read the full feature on NOWNESS: http://bit.ly/gerhard-richter Watch more art videos here: http://bit.ly/art-videos _______________________________________ Subscribe to NOWNESS here: http://bit.ly/youtube-nowness Like NOWNESS on Facebook: http://bit.ly/facebook-nowness Follow NOWNESS on Twitter: http://bit.ly/twitter-nowness Daily exclusives for the culturally curious: http://bit.ly/nowness-com Behind the scenes on Instagram: http://bit.ly/instagram-nowness Curated stories on Tumblr: http://bit.ly/tumblr-nowness Inspiration on Pinterest: http://bit.ly/pinterest-nowness Staff Picks on Vimeo: http://bit.ly/vimeo-nowness Follow NOWNESS on Google+: http://bit.ly/google-nowness

Adelsteen Normann (1848-1918) was a Norwegian painter who worked in Berlin. He was a noted painter of landscapes of Norway.

Normann was the artist who invited Edvard Munch to Berlin, where he painted The Scream. Normann's fjord paintings are credited with making the Norwegian fjords a more popular tourist destination.

Eilert Adelsteen Normann was born in 1848 in Bodin in Norway. He studied at the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf from 1869 to 1872 and his paintings belong to the Düsseldorf school of painting. He studied with the Estonian painter Eugen Dücker.

Normann based himself in Berlin from 1883. His paintings were nearly always landscapes and invariably of the fjords of Norway where he would show the water combined with small houses and boats and steep mountainsides.

Normann lived at the same time as Edvard Munch who was a fellow countryman. In the early 1890s, Normann was based in Berlin where he was doing good business selling his paintings to hotel owners. Normann had seen Munch's work when he had been exhibiting at Kristiania.

Normann wrote to Munch asking if he would exhibit his work in Berlin. Munch was so overcome that he packed up his exhibition on 20 October 1892 and went to Berlin where Normann true to his word befriended him. Munch's work was placed in an exhibition which caused such a stir that the painters in Berlin split into two societies. (It was suspected that the underlying reason for Normann's invitation to Munch was to cause this split).

Normann exhibited in Oslo, Berlin, London, Vienna, Düsseldorf, Munich and Paris. Although based in Germany from 1883, he would return to Norway each summer. Normann and Hans Dahl both had large ornamented wooden villas near Balestrand where they would entertain. His "dragon style" house was bought in 1891 and built (like many Norwegian houses) from a prefabricated kit from the city of Trondheim. The house stayed with his heirs until 1934.

Normann notably exhibited at the prestigious Salon de Paris from as early as 1882. His paintings earned a 'Mention Honorable' in 1884 and he was awarded a bronze medal in 1889. It is assumed that his fjord paintings contributed to make the Norwegian fjords a popular tourist destination.

He died at Kristiania (now: Oslo) on 26 December 1918, during the worldwide Spanish Flu pandemic

Normann's paintings are included in galleries in Bergen, Cincinnati, Cologne, Dresden, Leeds, Liverpool and Stockholm. In Normann's birthplace in 2010 is a dedicated gallery which has thirty of his paintings.

Adelsteen Normann (1848-1918)

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