2018 Haval H6 Ultra Sport - Affordable SUV Full Overview

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2017 Haval H2 Review | CarTell.tv

Simone reviews the 2017 Haval H2 in the ‘Premium’ trim level. It’s called Haval and with more than 1 million sales worldwide in 2016, Haval is quickly growing in popularity and proving that newer manufacturers from countries like China and India really have a lot to offer. The 2017 H2 which Simone looks at is a strong contestant in the smaller SUV market, only if people know about it. Simone is reviewing the 2017 Haval H2 Premium. It’s called a premium, despite being the lower trim level. Lux is Haval’s top of the line trim level and there are only 2 trim levels available. This compact SUV is edging its way into the Australian market to as to compete with the more well-known sellers from reputable brands like the Toyota CH-R, Suzuki Vitara, and Honda CRV For more information on the Haval H2 as well as other car news and car review videos, visit: http://www.cartell.tv #haval #cartelltv #h2

2018 Haval H6 SUV is The Best Chinese SUV Car Yet - Full Overview

If you’ve not heard of the Haval H6, you’re probably not alone. In fact, if you didn’t even know that Haval was a thing, you’re still probably in the majority. The Chinese maker and its medium-sized H6 SUV are here to compete with the big players. The H6 fights in the largest segment of the SUV market, against the likes of the Mazda CX-5, Toyota RAV4, Hyundai Tucson, Honda CR-V, Nissan X-Trail and all of those other very impressive, family friendly offerings. With two trim levels available, and aggressive pricing on both the entry-grade Premium and top-spec Lux tested here, the Haval H6 seemingly has something to make it stand out in the Australian market, offering customers who want a lot of car for their cash an alternative to the entry-level grades of the mainstream Korean and Japanese players. But in the midst of fierce competition, ever-sharpening prices and the continually expanding equipment lists of base model SUVs, is there really a place for this Chinese model? Until recently, the Haval H6 definitely offered truly good value for money. At launch it arrived with a base price of $31,990 drive-away for the entry-level Premium and $34,990 drive-away for this Lux version. But since then, there has been a lot of new model activity in the medium-SUV segment, and some hallmark players have added kit and dropped prices to boost sales and maintain relevance. The Premium comes with 17-inch alloy wheels, fog-lights, auto headlights and wipers, laser puddle lights, heated auto-folding side mirrors, tinted glass, roof-rails, cruise control, mood lighting, stainless-steel scuff plates, electric driver’s seat adjustment, fabric seat trim, dual-zone climate control, keyless entry and push-button start, and an 8.0-inch touchscreen multimedia unit with Bluetooth phone and audio streaming and USB input. The Lux adds a panoramic sunroof, heated front and rear seats, power-adjustable passenger seat, fake leather trim, its sound system gains a sub-woofer, and it has better headlights - xenon units with auto levelling - plus 19-inch wheels. There are seven colours to choose from, six of which are metallics that attract a $495 premium. Buyers can even choose between a range of different coloured interiors; the Premium has the choice of black or grey/black, while the Lux has black, grey/black or brown/black. And there are deals to be had. The H6 Premium can now be had at $29,990 drive-away with free sat nav (usually $990 more) and a $500 gift card. You’ll get the Lux for $33,990 drive-away. The H6 doesn’t have sat nav fitted as standard in any spec, and Apple CarPlay/Android Auto phone mirroring technology isn’t available at all. Safety kit is respectable, if not class-leading, with a reversing camera, front and rear parking sensors, six airbags, dual ISOFIX child-seat attachment points (and three top-tether hooks), and blind-spot monitoring included in both variants. It doesn’t look very much like the other models in Haval’s range, and that’s a good thing. The H2, H8 and H9 all have the rounded edges of yesteryear, where the H6 is sharper, smarter, more sophisticated. It looks more European than Chinese, to my eye. The proportions of the Haval H6 are quite fetching - the brand, cheekily, labels it the H6 Coupe in its home market. It has lines in the right places, a shapely silhouette and a pert backside, all of which combine to give it a certain presence on the road. It is more stylish than a few of its class compatriots, that’s for sure. And the Lux model rolls on 19-inch wheels, which certainly help in that regard. The interior, though, isn’t as amazing, despite looking inviting. There’s a lot of fake wood and hard plastic, and it doesn’t have the ergonomic intelligence of the better SUVs in the class. The swooping roofline makes for difficult rearward vision, too, with a letterbox rear windscreen and thick D-pillars.

2018 Haval H6C Review

Chinese brands don't have the best reputation in South Africa. Sub-par quality products, shocking safety ratings and a less-than-ideal dealer network has left a bit of a foul taste in the South African consumer's mouth. Haval is intent on changing that stigma and their latest mid-size SUV, the H6 C, may just have what it takes to have the public sit up and take notice. We drove the Haval H6 C City, with a manual gearbox, and found it to surprisingly good. Overall refinement is quite high and the drive is befitting of a vehicle with a considerably higher price tag. It's not all praise though, and there are a few small hiccups worth noting, but nothing so serious that it would stop us spending our money on it.

2018 SEM DX3 CVT Luxury Infused With Pininfarina Design

The SouEsast DX3 EV is the electric variant of the DX3 SUV. It will be launched on the Chinese car market in November. Price including subsidies will start around $17,000. The DX3 EVcomes with the usual blue detailing in the badges, grille, wheels, and bumpers. In China blue is the color of new-energy vehicles, not green, like in the rest of the world. Power comes from an #electric motor with 120 hp, good for a 125 km/h top speed. Range hasn’t been announced yet but this sort of vehicles usually does somewhere between 180 and 250 kilometers. Blue SouEast badge. Note badge on the lower right, with a blue V with a leaf attached to it. Hmm hmm. Blue badges for green cars, okay. But blue leaves takes that blue thing a tad too far, doesn’t it..?! The petrol powered SouEast DX3.

2018 Haval H6 is Another Somewhat Sporty SUV For You

We picked up the 2018 Haval H6 as a replacement for my Holden Cruze SRi-V. We chose the Haval H6 as we wanted a medium-sized SUV and to keep our spending down. The Haval H6 has a heap of features for its price range, and the options you get with the Lux model you won’t find anywhere else. But what you also won’t find anywhere is poor customer follow-up and a lack of respect from the team at Haval. As stated before, we picked the Haval H6 Lux due to its awesomely low price when you compare it to other cars on the market. The features you get with the Lux model include climate control, leather seating, GPS, moon roof, mood lighting and a spacious boot to name a few. At around $30,000–$35,000, you won’t find these options included with other brands.

If you’ve not heard of the Haval H6, you’re probably not alone. In fact, if you didn’t even know that Haval was a thing, you’re still probably in the majority.

The Chinese maker and its medium-sized H6 SUV are here to compete with the big players. The H6 fights in the largest segment of the SUV market, against the likes of the Mazda CX-5, Toyota RAV4, Hyundai Tucson, Honda CR-V, Nissan X-Trail and all of those other very impressive, family friendly offerings.
With two trim levels available, and aggressive pricing on both the entry-grade Premium and top-spec Lux tested here, the Haval H6 seemingly has something to make it stand out in the Australian market, offering customers who want a lot of car for their cash an alternative to the entry-level grades of the mainstream Korean and Japanese players.

But in the midst of fierce competition, ever-sharpening prices and the continually expanding equipment lists of base model SUVs, is there really a place for this Chinese model? Let’s see…

Until recently, the Haval H6 definitely offered truly good value for money. At launch it arrived with a base price of $31,990 drive-away for the entry-level Premium and $34,990 drive-away for this Lux version. But since then, there has been a lot of new model activity in the medium-SUV segment, and some hallmark players have added kit and dropped prices to boost sales and maintain relevance.
The Premium comes with 17-inch alloy wheels, fog-lights, auto headlights and wipers, laser puddle lights, heated auto-folding side mirrors, tinted glass, roof-rails, cruise control, mood lighting, stainless-steel scuff plates, electric driver’s seat adjustment, fabric seat trim, dual-zone climate control, keyless entry and push-button start, and an 8.0-inch touchscreen multimedia unit with Bluetooth phone and audio streaming and USB input.

The Lux adds a panoramic sunroof, heated front and rear seats, power-adjustable passenger seat, fake leather trim, its sound system gains a sub-woofer, and it has better headlights - xenon units with auto levelling - plus 19-inch wheels.

There are seven colours to choose from, six of which are metallics that attract a $495 premium. Buyers can even choose between a range of different coloured interiors; the Premium has the choice of black or grey/black, while the Lux has black, grey/black or brown/black, as you see here.

And there are deals to be had. The H6 Premium can now be had at $29,990 drive-away with free sat nav (usually $990 more) and a $500 gift card. You’ll get the Lux for $33,990 drive-away.

The H6 doesn’t have sat nav fitted as standard in any spec, and Apple CarPlay/Android Auto phone mirroring technology isn’t available at all.

Safety kit is respectable, if not class-leading, with a reversing camera, front and rear parking sensors, six airbags, dual ISOFIX child-seat attachment points (and three top-tether hooks), and blind-spot monitoring included in both variants.
It doesn’t look very much like the other models in Haval’s range, and that’s a good thing. The H2, H8 and H9 all have the rounded edges of yesteryear, where the H6 is sharper, smarter, more sophisticated. It looks more European than Chinese, to my eye.

The proportions of the Haval H6 are quite fetching - the brand, cheekily, labels it the H6 Coupe in its home market. It has lines in the right places, a shapely silhouette and a pert backside, all of which combine to give it a certain presence on the road. It is more stylish than a few of its class compatriots, that’s for sure. And the Lux model rolls on 19-inch wheels, which certainly help in that regard.

The interior, though, isn’t as amazing, despite looking inviting. There’s a lot of fake wood and hard plastic, and it doesn’t have the ergonomic intelligence of the better SUVs in the class. The swooping roofline makes for difficult rearward vision, too, with a letterbox rear windscreen and thick D-pillars.

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