Why all world maps are wrong

author Vox   2 год. назад
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Why America still uses Fahrenheit

Fahrenheit, explained to the rest of the world Since I've moved to the US in 2010, there's one thing that I still don't fully understand: the imperial system. Virtually every country on earth uses Celsius but America has yet to follow. Although it might not seem like a big deal, not using the metric system puts America at a great disadvantage. For example, American kids have to learn 2 sets of measurements making science education even more difficult. On top of that, American companies have to produce extra products to export to metric countries. So why does the United States still have such an antiquated system of measurement? Read more about Fahrenheit here: https://www.vox.com/2015/2/16/8031177/america-fahrenheit Read more about the metric system here: https://www.vox.com/2014/5/29/5758542/time-for-the-US-to-use-the-metric-system Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The surprising pattern behind color names around the world

Why so many languages invented words for colors in the same order. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO In 1969, two Berkeley researchers, Paul Kay and Brent Berlin, published a book on a pretty groundbreaking idea: that every culture in history, when they developed their languages, invented words for colors in the exact same order. They claimed to know this based off of a simple color identification test, where 20 respondents identified 330 colored chips by name. If a language had six words, they were always black, white, red, green, yellow, and blue. If it had four terms, they were always black, white, red, and then either green or yellow. If it had only three, they were always black, white, and red , and so on. The theory was revolutionary — and it shaped our understanding of how color terminologies emerge. Read more on the research mentioned in this video: Cook, Kay, and Regier on the World Color Survey: goo.gl/MTUi9C Stephen C. Levinson on Yele color terms: goo.gl/CYDfvw John A. Lucy on Hanunó'o color terms: goo.gl/okcyC3 Loreto, Mukherjee, and Tria on color naming population simulations: goo.gl/rALO1S To learn more about how your language's color words can affect the way you think, check out this video lecture: goo.gl/WxYi1q Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The high cost of free parking

Hidden parking rules hurt our cities. Will Chilton and Paul Mackie of Mobility Lab explain. Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO The cities we live in are shaped by the way we get around them. Over the past 60 years, with more and more people opting to drive cars, the need for parking spaces has increased with the boom in driving. To accommodate that demand early on, cities and towns started requiring developers to include parking with their new buildings after World War II. These policies, known as mandatory parking minimums, set precise standards for parking spaces for each building. And these parking spaces don't come cheap. To learn much more on free parking's affect on cities, Donald Shoup's book is here: https://www.amazon.com/High-Cost-Free-Parking-Updated/dp/193236496X And Mobility Lab, who helped make this video, covers many more issues around infrastructure is here: https://mobilitylab.org/ Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

The Terrifying Truth About Bananas

Hank loves bananas and is worried about their future, so he did some investigating and wrote this episode of SciShow to share some kinda scary banana truths with us. Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow -- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-6uzR

Exploring other dimensions - Alex Rosenthal and George Zaidan

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/exploring-other-dimensions-alex-rosenthal-and-george-zaidan Imagine a two-dimensional world -- you, your friends, everything is 2D. In his 1884 novella, Edwin Abbott invented this world and called it Flatland. Alex Rosenthal and George Zaidan take the premise of Flatland one dimension further, imploring us to consider how we would see dimensions different from our own and why the exploration just may be worth it. Lesson by Alex Rosenthal and George Zaidan, animation by Cale Oglesby.

Making accurate world maps is mathematically impossible.

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Interact with projections: http://metrocosm.com/compare-map-projections.html
Mercator tool: http://thetruesize.com/
Mike Bostock Map Transitions: http://bl.ocks.org/mbostock/3711652
Mercator Puzzle: http://hive.sewanee.edu/ldale/maps/10/06-LOCAL.html

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com

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