Willem Van Aelst (1626-1683) - A collection of paintings & drawings 2K Ultra HD Silent Slideshow

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John White Alexander (1856-1915) A collection of paintings 4K Ultra HD Silent Slideshow

John White Alexander (1856-1915) A collection of paintings 4K Ultra HD Silent Slideshow American portrait, figure, and decorative painter and illustrator. Alexander was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, now a part of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Orphaned in infancy, he was reared by his grandparents and, at the age of 12, became a telegraph boy in Pittsburgh. Edward J. Allen became an early supporter and patron of John W. Alexander, adopting the orphaned Alexander while he worked at the Pacific and Atlantic Telegraph Co. as a young man. Allen brought Alexander to the Allen home at "Edgehill" where Alexander painted various members of the Allen family, including Colonel Allen. His talent at drawing attracted the attention of one of his employers, who assisted him to develop them. He moved to New York City at the age of eighteen and worked in an office at Harper's Weekly, where he was an illustrator and political cartoonist at the same time that Abbey, Pennell, Pyle, and other celebrated illustrators worked there. After an apprenticeship of three years, he travelled to Munich for his first formal training. Owing to the lack of funds, he removed to the village of Polling, Bavaria, and worked with Frank Duveneck. They travelled to Venice, where he profited by the advice of Whistler, and then he continued his studies in Florence, the Netherlands, and Paris. In 1881 he returned to New York and speedily achieved great success in portraiture, numbering among his sitters Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Burroughs, Henry G. Marquand, R. A. L. Stevenson, and president McCosh of Princeton University. Alexander was married to Elizabeth Alexander Alexander, to whom he was introduced in part because of their shared last name. Elizabeth was the daughter of James Waddell Alexander, President of the Equitable Life Assurance Society at the time of the Hyde Ball scandal. The Alexanders had one child, the mathematician James Waddell Alexander II. Many of his paintings are in museums and public places in the United States and in Europe, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Art Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Butler Institute, and the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. In addition, in the entrance hall to the Art Museum of the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh, a series of Alexander's murals entitled "Apotheosis of Pittsburgh" (1905–1907) covers the walls of the three-storey atrium area. Alexander's Artist Proof of his portrait of Whitman, signed by the artist in April 1911, is in the Walt Whitman Collection at the University of Pennsylvani. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_White_Alexander

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Who exactly painted Tobit and Anna in the Willem van der Vorm Collection? The panel was subjected to scientific analysis in 2010, and the conclusion was that it originated in Rembrandt's studio. But Jeroen Giltaij, curator of this museum, and Ernst van de Wetering, head researcher of the Rembrandt Research Project, do not agree on who actually wielded the brush. Giltaij bases his opinion on intuition and traditional connoisseurship; Van de Wetering approaches the issue with the probability theory of the scientist Thomas Bayes. In this video, Ernst van de Wetering puts forward a series of arguments that support the idea Tobit and Anna was painted by the great master himself. From 24 March 2012, the cleaned and restored painting will be exhibited in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen; this video is part of the presentation. More video's: arttube.nl

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Dutch Flowers: In conversation | Betsy Wieseman and Brian Capstick | The National Gallery, London

Betsy Wieseman, Curator of our exhibition 'Dutch Flowers', and collector Brian Capstick, discuss the charm and attraction of Dutch flower paintings at one of our lunchtime talks. Subscribe for more videos on art: http://bit.ly/1HrNTFd Watch more lunchtime talks on paintings in the National Gallery: http://bit.ly/1ox9gwx Dutch Flowers 6 April – 29 August 2016 Room 1 Free entry Explore the evolution of Dutch flower painting over the course of two centuries. The exhibition explores Dutch flower painting from its beginnings in the early 17th century to its peak in the late 18th century, and is the first display of its kind in 20 years. 'Dutch Flowers' presents an overview of the leading artists in the field, such as Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder, Jan van Huysum, and Rachel Ruysch, providing a chance to admire their stylistic and technical characteristics, and the exquisite details of their paintings. Find out more: http://bit.ly/2bJgA3B Like the National Gallery on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thenationalgallery/ Follow the National Gallery on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NationalGallery Follow the National Gallery on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/national_gallery/

The Forger's Masterclass - Ep.08 - John Singer Sargent

Willem Van Aelst (1626-1683) - A collection of paintings & drawings 2KHD silent slideshow

A Dutch Golden Age artist who specialized in still-life painting with flowers or game.

Van Aelst was born in Delft to a family of prominent city magistrates. He learned to paint from his uncle, the still-life painter Evert van Aelst. On 9 November 1643, he enrolled as a master of the Guild of Saint Luke at Delft.

Between 1645 and 1649 he lived in France. In 1649 Van Aelst travelled to Florence, where he served as court painter to Ferdinando II de' Medici, grand duke of Tuscany. Here he was known as Guillielmo d'Olanda. At this time, the grand duke also employed two fellow Dutchmen Matthias Withoos and Otto Marseus van Schrieck, the latter also a still-life painter who probably influenced Van Aelst's style. Ferdinando II publicly presented Van Aelst with a gold chain and medal, as a testimony of his approbation and an acknowledgement of his talents.

It has been conjectured that Van Aelst visited Rome where he became a member of the Bentvueghels, an association of mainly Dutch and Flemish artists active in Rome. This conjecture is based, not very convincingly, on his practice during the years 1657/58 to sign his works with his name followed by: ‘alias (and a drawn stick figure)'. Some interpreted this as a reference to a Bent name (the nickname that a member of the Bentvueghels would adopt) – De Vogelverschrikker (Dutch for 'Scarecrow')- but there are no documents confirming this.

In 1656 he returned to the Netherlands to settle permanently in Amsterdam. He became one of the most prominent still-life painters of his generation, which allowed him to live on the Prinsengracht. He must have at Amsterdam died in 1683 or shortly thereafter, as his latest dated work is from that year. Van Aelst taught Rachel Ruysch, Isaac Denies, Maria van Oosterwijck, and Ernst Stuven

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willem_van_Aelst

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