Abraham Solomon (1824-1862) A collection of paintings 4K Ultra HD

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Top 10 Painters of All Time

Whether on the walls of a cave, the tombs of great kings, a canvas, or the walls of a building, the human desire to put ink to paper has left the world with some of the most beautiful masterpieces. Welcome to WatchMojo.com, and today we’re counting down our picks for the top 10 painters of all time. Check us out at http://www.Twitter.com/WatchMojo, http://instagram.com/watchmojo and http://www.Facebook.com/WatchMojo Thanks to our users iamnotarobot, fsanders2, Philip Folta, Dave Dela Peña and Pip Gerard for suggesting the idea on our suggest tool over at watchmojo.com/suggest Check out the voting page here, http://watchmojo.com/suggest/Top%2010%20Painters If you want to suggest an idea for a WatchMojo video, check out our interactive Suggestion Tool at http://www.WatchMojo.com/suggest :) We have T-Shirts! Be sure to check out http://www.WatchMojo.com/store for more info. WatchMojo is a leading producer of reference online video content, covering the People, Places and Trends you care about. We update DAILY with 2-3 Top 10 lists, Origins, Biographies, Versus clips on movies, video games, music, pop culture and more!

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (1780-1867) volume one A collection of paintings 4K

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780-1867) was a French Neoclassical painter. Ingres was profoundly influenced by past artistic traditions and aspired to become the guardian of academic orthodoxy against the ascendant Romantic style. Although he considered himself a painter of history in the tradition of Nicolas Poussin and Jacques-Louis David, it is his portraits, both painted and drawn, that are recognized as his greatest legacy. His expressive distortions of form and space made him an important precursor of modern art, influencing Picasso, Matisse and other modernists. Born into a modest family in Montauban, he travelled to Paris to study in the studio of David. In 1802 he made his Salon debut, and won the Prix de Rome for his painting The Ambassadors of Agamemnon in the tent of Achilles. By the time he departed in 1806 for his residency in Rome, his style—revealing his close study of Italian and Flemish Renaissance masters—was fully developed, and would change little for the rest of his life. While working in Rome and subsequently Florence from 1806 to 1824, he regularly sent paintings to the Paris Salon, where they were faulted by critics who found his style bizarre and archaic. He received few commissions during this period for the history paintings he aspired to paint, but was able to support himself and his wife as a portrait painter and draughtsman. Ingres's style was formed early in life and changed comparatively little. His earliest drawings, such as the Portrait of a Man (or Portrait of an unknown, 3 July 1797, now in the Louvre) already show a suavity of outline and an extraordinary control of the parallel hatchings which model the forms. From the first, his paintings are characterized by a firmness of outline reflecting his often-quoted conviction that "drawing is the probity of art". He believed colour to be no more than an accessory to drawing, explaining: "Drawing is not just reproducing contours, it is not just the line; drawing is also the expression, the inner form, the composition, the modelling. See what is left after that. Drawing is seven eighths of what makes up painting." The art historian Jean Clay said Ingres "proceeded always from certitude to certitude, with the result that even his freest sketches reveal the same kind of execution as that found in the final works." Abhorring the visible brushstroke, Ingres made no recourse to the shifting effects of colour and light on which the Romantic school depended; he preferred local colours only faintly modelled in light by half tones. "Ce que l'on sait," he would repeat, "il faut le savoir l'épée à la main." ("Whatever you know, you must know it with sword in hand.") Ingres thus left himself without the means of producing the necessary unity of effect when dealing with crowded compositions, such as the Apotheosis of Homer and the Martyrdom of Saint Symphorian. Among Ingres's historical and mythological paintings, the most satisfactory are usually those depicting one or two figures, such as Oedipus, The Half-Length Bather, Odalisque, and The Spring, subjects only animated by the consciousness of perfect physical well-being. Ingres was averse to theories, and his allegiance to classicism—with its emphasis on the ideal, the generalized, and the regular—was tempered by his love of the particular. He believed that "the secret of beauty has to be found through truth. The ancients did not create, they did not make; they recognized." In many of Ingres's works there is a collision between the idealized and the particular that creates what Robert Rosenblum termed an "oil-and-water sensation". This contradiction is vivid in Cherubini and the Muse of Lyric Poetry (1842), for example, in which the detailed rendering of the 81-year-old composer is juxtaposed with an idealized muse in classical drapery. Although capable of painting quickly, he often laboured for years over a painting. Ingres's pupil Amaury-Duval wrote of him: "With this facility of execution, one has trouble explaining why Ingres' oeuvre is not still larger, but he scraped out frequently, never being satisfied ... and perhaps this facility itself made him rework whatever dissatisfied him, certain that he had the power to repair the fault, and quickly, too." The Source, although dated 1856, was painted about 1820, except for the head and the extremities; Amaury-Duval, who knew the work in its incomplete state, professed that the after-painting, necessary to fuse new and old, lacked the vigour and precision of touch that distinguished the original execution of the torso. Thank you, please subscribe for future videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gMk3w9hw8BbtqoUpEMKeg?sub_confirmation=1

Rethinking infidelity ... a talk for anyone who has ever loved | Esther Perel

Infidelity is the ultimate betrayal. But does it have to be? Relationship therapist Esther Perel examines why people cheat, and unpacks why affairs are so traumatic: because they threaten our emotional security. In infidelity, she sees something unexpected — an expression of longing and loss. A must-watch for anyone who has ever cheated or been cheated on, or who simply wants a new framework for understanding relationships. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector

Baumgartner Fine Art Restoration

Hey, Chicago Aussie here. This is a video I created about Julian from Baumgartner Restoration. He has his own channel here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvZe6ZCbF9xgbbbdkiodPKQ ReMade in Chicago, Baumgartner Restoration is a second-generation art conservation studio in Chicago. Follow Julian as he completely restores a damaged painting. Baumgartner Restoration Instagram - https://goo.gl/mE96gT Baumgartner Restoration Website - https://goo.gl/9mzN1F Support Chicago Aussie https://paypal.me/Brandtman Painting - Self-portrait by Emma Gaggiotti Richards Music - Evolving Dawn by Paul Mottram Follow me Twitter - https://goo.gl/HklCN3 Facebook - https://goo.gl/C1C9DO Instagram - https://goo.gl/86wv9R Film by the Chicago Aussie

Abraham Solomon (1823-1862) was an English painter.

Born as the second son of Meyer Solomon, a Leghorn hat manufacturer, by his wife Catherine, in Sandys Street, Bishopsgate in east London. His father was one of the first Jews to be admitted to the freedom of the city of London. Two members of the family besides Abraham became artists.

A younger brother, Simeon Solomon, acquired much acclaim as an associate of the Pre-Raphaelites and exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1858 to 1872; his later crayon drawings of idealised heads are still popular.

At the age of thirteen Abraham became a pupil in Sass's school of art in Bloomsbury, and in 1838 gained the Isis silver medal at the Society of Arts for a drawing from a statue. In 1839 he was admitted as a student of the Royal Academy, where he received in the same year a silver medal for drawing from the antique, and in 1843 another for drawing from the life.

Solomon died in Biarritz in France, of heart disease, on 19 December 1862, the same day on which he was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy. He married, on 10 May 1860, Ella, sister of Dr. Ernest Hart; she survived her husband

His first exhibited work, Rabbi expounding the Scriptures, appeared at the Society of British Artists in 1840, and in the following year he sent to the Royal Academy My Grandmother and a scene from Sir Walter Scott's Fair Maid of Perth.

These were followed (at the Academy) by a scene from the Vicar of Wakefield in 1842, another from Crabbe's Parish Register in 1843, and a third from Peveril of the Peak in 1845. The Breakfast Table, exhibited in 1846, and a further scene from the Vicar of Wakefield in 1847, attracted some attention.

In 1848 appeared A Ball Room in the year 1760, and in 1849 the Academy for Instruction in the Discipline of the Fan, 1711, both of which pictures were distinguished by brilliancy of colour and careful study of costume. Too Truthful was his contribution to the exhibition of the Royal Academy in 1850, and An Awkward Position—an incident in the life of Oliver Goldsmith—to that of 1851. In 1851, also, he sent to the British Institution Scandal and La petite Dieppoise.

In 1852 appeared at the Academy The Grisette and a scene from Molière's Tartuffe—the quarrel between Mariane and Valère, where Dorine interferes—and in 1853 Brunetta and Phillis, from the Spectator. In 1854, he sent to the Academy First Class: The Meeting (National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa), and Second Class: The Parting (National Gallery of Australia, Canberra). Both were engraved in mezzotint by William Henry Simmons in 1857, and evidenced a great advance in Solomon's work. They show an originality of conception and design which is not apparent in his earlier work.

His next contributions to the Royal Academy were A Contrast in 1855, The Bride and Doubtful Fortune in 1856, and Waiting for the Verdict in 1857. The last picture greatly increased his popularity; but its companion, Not Guilty, exhibited in 1859, was less successful.

Both became the property of C. J. Lucas, esq., and were also engraved by Simmons. The Flight, Mlle. Blaiz, and The Lion in Love (also engraved by Simmons) were exhibited at the academy in 1858; Ici on rase, Brittany and The Fox and the Grapes in 1859; Drowned! Drowned! in 1860; Consolation and Le Malade Imaginaire in 1861; and The Lost Found in 1862. Art Critics in Brittany appeared at the British Institution in 1861.

His last work, Departure of the Diligence at Biarritz, is now at the Royal Holloway College, Egham.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Solomon

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