Dutch Flowers: In conversation | Betsy Wieseman and Brian Capstick | The National Gallery, London

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Betsy Wieseman, Curator of our exhibition 'Dutch Flowers', and collector Brian Capstick, discuss the charm and attraction of Dutch flower paintings at one of our lunchtime talks.
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Dutch Flowers
6 April – 29 August 2016
Room 1
Free entry

Explore the evolution of Dutch flower painting over the course of two centuries. The exhibition explores Dutch flower painting from its beginnings in the early 17th century to its peak in the late 18th century, and is the first display of its kind in 20 years.

'Dutch Flowers' presents an overview of the leading artists in the field, such as Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder, Jan van Huysum, and Rachel Ruysch, providing a chance to admire their stylistic and technical characteristics, and the exquisite details of their paintings.

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