2018 Changan Raeton CC Concept Is One Of China's Better Looking Efforts

author Autohome Trend   10 мес. назад
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2018 Changhe Q7 SUV Launched On The Global Car Market

New Spy Shots of the Changhe Q7, a mid-sized SUV for China with a big shiny grille, black pillars, and a think roof. The Changhe Q7, not to be confused with the Audi Q7, will debut on Friday on the Guangzhou Auto Show and launch on the Chinese car market in December. Changhe Auto is a subsidiary of Beijing Auto (BAIC). Changhe’s new cars are aimed at buyers in second and third tier cities. They are largely based on exiting Beijing Auto platforms but with some unique design features, and they are cheaper than Beijing Auto’s offerings. The Changhe Q6 is based on the Beijng Auto BJ20. The Q7 comes with a giant 12 inch touch screen, much bigger than the screen inside the BJ20. Buttons under the screen look very hip. The instrument panel seems fully digital. Power comes from a 1.5 turbo with 150 hp, mated to a six-speed manual or a CVT. Price for all this pretty will start around 90,000 yuan or $13,580. Proper roof rails, chrome strips above and under the windows, pretty lights, black wheel arches, and an invisible exhaust pipe.

2018 Changan CS95 7-Seat SUV Is Ready For The Car Market

A seven-seat family SUV that could be part of an export drive to the UK by Chinese company Changan, the CS95 is the bigger sister to the crossover-sized CS55. Technically, the CS95 and CS55 are related only by being made by the same company – they use different chassis platforms, despite being launched within 12 months of each other. Getting under the Changan CS95’s skin The roomy CS95 went on sale in China in late 2016, based on an all-new monocoque platform designed and developed in-house by a team featuring European engineering talent based at Changan’s engineering centres in Chongqing, central China. There’s a more direct British link – the all-new Blue Core 233bhp 2.0-litre turbo direct-injection four-cylinder petrol engine that powers the CS95 was designed and developed in Birmingham at Changan’s UK engineering centre. And a styling studio in Italy’s car design capital, Turin, helped create the CS95’s wholesome, Land Rover-influenced styling. The transmission on our test car was a six-speed Aisin Warner automatic, driving all four wheels via the transversely mounted four-pot petrol. Suspension is front struts and a rear twist beam for front-drive variants and a multi-link rear for all-wheel drive – the latter built around BorgWarner components to shift drive rearwards via an in-line driveshaft. Steering is electrically assisted and a suite of electronic safety aids is either standard or on the options list. Automatic emergency braking, for example, is available as part of the intelligent cruise control package on the top-spec model being tested here – an indication that Chinese own-brand cars are catching up with the West. At 4.9 metres long and sitting on a 2.8m wheelbase, the CS95 is sized just about halfway between the Land Rover Discovery Sport and Discovery, but its price range is resolutely more affordable. In the home market, it starts from £20,780 – that’s Nissan Qashqai money – and the top-spec all-wheel-drive CS95 extends to just £28k, although UK pricing is a long way from being finalised. Chinese brands are also making progress in interior design quality in leaps and bounds. There are hard plastics and a few inelegant design details, but the overall ambience inside the CS95 is attractive. Highlights include a polished chrome trim, robust switchgear and a crystal-clear infotainment system, which can be displayed in English. It fits the bill as a comfy family hauler, with a well-planted cruise, good cabin refinement and a fair balance of body control and ride quality. At its best, the CS95 is a motorway hauler that moves its occupants in comfort and keeps noise levels supressed, bar wind noise from the side mirrors. A pair of hefty front and rear subframes no doubt help isolate noise paths from the front and rear suspension and, in China’s choking city traffic, the CS95 rides quietly. Changan’s engineers say they have tried hard to ensure braking and transmission refinement in stop/start traffic, and they have succeeded – the CS95 has easily modulated brakes, making smooth stops in traffic easy to achieve. On Changan’s own smoothly surfaced handling test track, the CS95 is also surprisingly agile and can be hustled through corners with reasonable speed, albeit accompanied by a fair degree of body roll, despite front and rear anti-roll bars. Changan’s British chassis engineers accept that cornering could be better-controlled by thicker anti-roll bars, but the deterioration in ride wouldn’t fit the CS95’s role as a comfortable family cruiser. China’s roads are very mixed in surface quality and frequently vary between undulations and potholes that demand rugged and compliant suspension. The British-designed 2.0-litre turbo delivers a smooth and cultured accelerative push, but the choice of gear ratios in the Aisin Warner six-speeder doesn’t match the engine as well as it could. We had no chance to measure fuel economy and official figures were not provided, but we were told a combined figure of 30mpg was typical. Acceleration off the line is strangely muted, the calibration seemingly holding back the power delivery until the speed moves through the 30mph mark. And the CS95 is a hefty lump to get up to speed, loading the scales to a two-tonne kerb weight. A Discovery Sport, for example, is featherweight in comparison, weighing around 200kg lighter. The chance may not come for a number of years yet, as Changan is eyeing up the UK market but won’t commit to a launch date. The company is most likely to wait until the next-generation model to further hone engineering and design to Western tastes. If a CS95 went on sale in the UK now, it would offer a competitive alternative to Korean and European rivals, albeit with its appeal focused on comfort and refinement rather than dynamic prowess.

2018 WEY VV7 SUV Sporty From China Full Review

The very first photos of the WEY VV7, formerly known as the WEY 01. The VV7 will be launched on the Chinese car market later this month. Somewhat confusingly the white car on the photos appears to be the sportier S model (compare with base model) with a racy bumpers and four big exhaust pipes, but it doesn’t have the S badge on the back. In anyway, we expect WEY to confuse us a many times more. WEY is a new “premium SUV” brand under Great Wall Motors. After the VV7 they will launch the car currently known as the WEY 02, a similar looking but smaller SUV. The VV7 has become quite a good looking car, and we especially like the shape of the wheel arches. Very classy. The interior is a masterpiece in simplicity. Many Chinese automakers love to add as much buttons and panels as possibly possible, but Great Wall is showing great restraint here. The materials are top notch. The steering wheel and seats looks luxurious. Perforated pedals seem to be made of metal. Three air vents on the ultra clean center stack. The only thing that isn’t so good is the relatively small touch screen. Power for the VV7 (S and not-S) comes from a 2.0 turbo with 234hp and 360nm, it is mated to a 7-speed DCT sending horses to all four wheels. WEY logo on the engine cover. there’s a lot of influence from Maserati, Jaguar and even Peugeot in this WEY VV7 crossover soon to hit the Chinese market, but it’s really not bad. It has an aggressive Levante-esque front end, purposeful side profile and smart rear lights similar to those of the latest Peugeot 3008. Music Credit : PACIFIC SUN by Nicolai Heidlas Music https://soundcloud.com/nicolai-heidlas Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/kbqmEJTr3nU

2018 Changan Eado Sedan Exterior & Interior

This little red cracker is the brand new Changan Eado XT, a stylish hatchback for the China, fitted with a giant shiny grille and LED lights. The new Eado XT is the successor of the old Eado XT, which was quite a good looker too, but this one is even better. Price of the new Eado XT will start around 72,000 yuan and end around 97,000 yuan. Engines: 125 hp 1.6 mated to a six-speed manual or six-speed automatic, and a 170 hp 1.5 turbo mated to a 7-speed DCT. Size: 4505/1820/1490, and wheelbase is 2700. Hatchbacks aren’t very popular anymore in crossover-crazy China but the Eado XT has been something of an exception; recording good sales in almost every month since it was born.

2018 Changan Eado (C211) GDI Luxury Sedan Full Overview

Changan has released the first official photos of the Eado DT, essentially a refreshed version of the Yuexiang V7. The model underwent an overhaul in both its exterior and interior, and an all-new front to align it with Changan’s newest design language. The model is positioned to be the entry model of the Eado family, and we estimate that the lowest spec model will probably have a starting price tag of around ¥50,000 yuan. Up front, the expressive grill, albeit with a tinge of Lexus and Crown in it, is a good embodiment of Changan’s newest aesthetics. Details such as the lanky headlight also shows similarities with its bigger brothers Eado and Raeton CC, rounding up Changan’s sedan line-up with a solid finishing touch.

The Changan Raeton CC is a sporty sedan with a confusing name. It is not really a ‘CC’ sedan coupe, and it is not at all based on the Raeton, which is a much bigger and more expensive car. The Raeton CC is in fact and instead the successor of the long-running Changan Eado sedan.
The Raeton CC comes with a big flashy grille, sharply cut headlights, big mirrors, and small wheels. It will be launched on the Chinese car market later this month. Price will range from 80.000 to 100.000 yuan. There will be two engines available: a 1.5 with about 120 hp and a 1.5 turbo with 154 hp.
It is great to see Chinese design is slowly becoming a bit more daring. It is less great to see that this daring-ness usually doesn’t extend beyond the grille.

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