Alphonse Maria Mucha Paintings (1860-1939) 4K Ultra HD

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Alphonse Maria Mucha Illustration (1860-1939) 4K Ultra HD .mp4

Alfons Maria Mucha (1860-1939) was a Czech painter, illustrator and graphic artist, living in Paris during the Art Nouveau period, best known for his distinctly stylized and decorative theatrical posters of Sarah Bernhardt. In the second part of his career, at the age of 43, he returned to his homeland and devoted himself to painting a series of twenty monumental canvases known as The Slav Epic, depicting the history of all the Slavic peoples of the world, which he painted between 1912 and 1926. In 1928, on the 10th anniversary of the independence of Czechoslovakia, he presented the series to the Czech nation. He considered it his most important work. It is now on display in the national museum of Prague. Mucha moved to Paris in 1888 where he enrolled in the Académie Julian and the following year, 1889, Académie Colarossi. The two schools taught a wide variety of different styles. His first professors at the Academie Julien were Jules Lefebvre who specialized in female nudes and allegorical paintings, and Jean-Paul Laurens, whose specialties were historical and religious paintings in a realistic and dramatic style. At the end of 1889, as he approached the age of thirty, his patron, Count Belasi, decided that Mucha had received enough education and ended his subsidies. When he arrived in Paris, Mucha found shelter with the help of the large Slavic community. He lived in a boarding house called the Crémerie at 13 rue de la Grand Chaumerie, whose owner, Charlotte Caron, was famous for sheltering struggling artists; when needed she accepted paintings or drawings in place of rent. Mucha decided to follow the path of another Czech painter he knew from Munich, Ludek Marold, who had made a successful career as an illustrator for magazines. In 1890 and 1891, he began providing illustrations for the weekly magazine La Vie popular, which published novels in weekly segments. His illustration for a novel by Guy de Maupassant called The Useless Beauty, was on the cover of the 22 May 1890 edition. His illustrations began to give him a regular income. He was able to buy a harmonium to continue his musical interests and his first camera, which used glass-plate negatives. He took pictures of himself and his friends, and also regularly used it to compose his drawings. He became friends with Paul Gauguin, and shared a studio with him for a time when Gauguin returned from Tahiti in the summer of 1893 In late autumn 1894 he also became friends with the playwright August Strindberg, with whom he had a common interest in philosophy and mysticism. His magazine illustrations led to book illustration; he was commissioned to provide illustrations for Scenes and Episodes of German History by historian Charles Seignobos.Four of his illustrations, including one depicting the death of Frederic Barbarossa, were chosen for display at the 1894 Paris Salon of Artists. He received a medal of honor, his first official recognition. Mucha added another important client in the early 1890s; the Central Library of Fine Arts, which specialized in the publication of books about art, architecture and the decorative arts. It later launched a new magazine in 1897 called Art et Decoration, which played an early and important role in publicizing the Art Nouveau style. He continued to publish illustrations for his other clients, including illustrating a children's book of poetry by Eugène Manuel, and illustrations for a magazine of the theater arts, called La Costume au théâtre. In the political turmoil of the 1930s, Mucha's work received little attention in Czechoslovakia. However, in 1936 a major retrospective was held in Paris at the Jeu de Paume museum, with 139 works, including three canvases from the Slav Epic. Hitler and Nazi Germany began to threaten Czechoslovakia in the 1930s. Mucha, began work on a new series, a triptych depicting the Age of Reason, the Age of Wisdom and the Age of Love, which he worked on from 1936 to 1938, but never completed. On March 15, 1939, the German army paraded through Prague, and Hitler, at Prague castle, declared the German Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia. Mucha's role as a Slav nationalist and Freemason made him a prime target. He was arrested, interrogated for several days, and released. By then his health was broken. He contracted and died of pneumonia on July 14, 1939, a few weeks before the outbreak of the Second World War. Though public gatherings were banned, a huge crowd attended his interment in the Slavin Monument of Vyšehrad cemetery, reserved for notable figures in Czech culture. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphonse_Mucha Mucha Foundation http://www.muchafoundation.org/ Mucha Museum in Prague http://www.mucha.cz/index.phtml?S=home&Lang=EN Thank you, please subscribe for future videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gMk3w9hw8BbtqoUpEMKeg?sub_confirmation=1

Early Western Slavic History

My Patreon- https://www.patreon.com/mlaser My Twitter- https://twitter.com/MnLaser My Merchandise- https://teespring.com/stores/mlaser-store?aid=marketplace&tsmac=marketplace&tsmic=campaign ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 0:21 Borders during this time changed almost monthly on occasion and there for the borders I will draw in this video are a snapshot of the borders of a kingdom only at one point and aren't representative of the borders during the whole kingdoms existence. I also draw all the borders my self according to the best sources at my disposable and there for I apologies for any border mistakes I may have done. 0:47 The map is suppose to represent Slavic settlements not any political entities. As the Slavic people often times then not settled in already existing political entities. 0:57 The etymology of the word Veneti is far from being as simple as I described and it wasn't solely invented by Procopiuse but as far as I know he was the first one to use that word to describe the Slavic tribes. 1:40 The golden jug medallion picture I used to represent the Avars is still disputed whether it was Avar's or Bulgar's or Khazar's. 1:39 The arrow symbolizes the movement of Lombards a Germanic tribe that lived in the lands settled by the Slavs and then pushed out by the invasion of the Avars. 2:02 Here I describe and show the Franks as one entity however that wasn't always the case. Franks had a complicated set of dominions with varies amounts of autonomy (like Bavaria) and most succession resulted in varies break ups, wars and reforms, etc. 3:10 Here I am showing the map of the most outer reaches of the Samo's kingdom/sphere of influence and as always it just represents a snapshot of the kingdom at its peak. 6:08 Here I am talking about the title surviving till 1918 not necessarily the hereditary Slavic line surviving. 9:14 It is usually said that Rastislav called for the priests because he wanted to convert the Moravian population however this has been disproved as Christian churches have been found dating decades earlier to Cyril and Methodist arrival. 9:16 Weather the brothers where native Slavic speakers or learned it later on in their lives is unknown. 9:30 I was trying to pronounce the English name for the alphabet which is Glagolitic. However I found it impossible to do the rest of the video pronouncing such a hard word so I reverted to the Czechoslovak name of the alphabet which is Hlaholika. (in Czech Hlaholice) 9:30 The Alphabet was based off of the Greek alphabet and modified to fit certain Slavic sounds that didn't exist in Greek. 11:40 The extend of Moravia was the largest under Svatopluk's reign however it's still debated how large Moravia really was. Here I am showing the largest possible extend of Moravia. 12:20 There are more reasons then just this to why the Western Slavs use Latin alphabet and there for I specified this was partly not fully the reason. There will still be remnants of Glagolitic reinstatement in the Western Slavic lands but they will never last for long. 13:00 We are jumping back here to explain how Hungarians became more known on the European political stage. As such please understand that the Moravian lands at this point still weren't the size as portrayed on the map. 13:18 The internal struggles where largely due to Mojmir's II brothers who inherited varies principalities with in Moravia and subsequently tried to take over the Moravian thrown for them self's. There's also an interesting myth surrounding Svatopluk's death which you can read here. http://www.slovakiasite.com/legends.php 13:41 This is very oversimplified and the Franks and Moravians didn't necessarily see eye to eye during this time but over all they did fight against the Hungarians. 13:59 It would take a while for the German (Bohemian) and Hungarian control to fully solidify in the areas but from now they where largely under their control. 14:49 Correction: Piast dynasty, not Mieszko dynasty 15:09 Dobrawa bore two children to Miesko. First, Boleslaw I a successor to the Polish throne even though his reign would be very short but more interestingly a daughter. This daughter is still debated to this day and depending on what source you believe she was either Swietoslawa the wife of Eric the Victorious, king of Sweden and then later on (because he died) Sweyn Forkbeard the king of Denmark and their son will later on become Cnut the Great king of Denmark, England and Norway. Or she was Gunhilda not born to Dobrawa but to Miesko’s second Saxon wife. Gunhilda was then the one who got married to Sweyn Forkbeard and became mother of Cnut. If that’s confusing don’t worry no one really knows for sure which version is accurate. Or whether any of them are. 15:15 Here I show the largest extend of Miesko's power however this will not last long. My video scripts are available on Patreon. #History #Slavic #WesternSlavs

Paul Klein on How to Succeed as an Artist

This is a talk I gave for Tandem Press' 25th Anniversary at the Chazen Museum in Madison, Wisconsin. For additional information please visit http://kleinartistworks.com/. If you have a question, please email me at paul@kleinartistworks.com. Thank you.

Prague, At The Heart Of Europe - Documentary

Prague is a magic city. At the geographic centre of Europe, this capital of a now new country boasts an incredible wealth of culture. Nestling amidst the meanders of the Vlatva river, the old city is a stone’s throw from the ultra-modern district of Karlin. The Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque, Art Nouveau and the communist regime have in turn left their mark on the city’s physiognomy. Mozart, Kafka, Mucha and many others have also left traces of their talent. Alternating cultural heritage with more contemporary themes, Pierre Brouwers shows us that Prague is anything but a museum city. Wenceslas Square . The Castle . Changing the Guard . St Guy’s Cathedral . The Vltava and Charles Bridge . The Old Town . Puppets . Shadow Theatre . The Jewish Quarter, Cemetery, Synagogues . Astronomy Clock . Powder Case Tower . The Battle of White Mountain . Urban Vineyards . Artists Market . The John Lennon Wall . Karlin Market . Architecture . Kafka Museum . Mucha Museum . Gold Backstreet . Petrín Hill, "Eiffel Tower” and Funicular Railway . The Feast of Saint Wenceslas . Prague by Night, Original Bars . Traditional Brasserie . Zizkov Tower and Giant Babies . Organ Concert . Metro and Tramways . Opera House . Concert and Traditional Dancing . Bohemia and Prague from the sky . Etc.

Alfons Maria Mucha (1860-1939) was a Czech painter, illustrator and graphic artist, living in Paris during the Art Nouveau period, best known for his distinctly stylized and decorative theatrical posters of Sarah Bernhardt.

In the second part of his career, at the age of 43, he returned to his homeland and devoted himself to painting a series of twenty monumental canvases known as The Slav Epic, depicting the history of all the Slavic peoples of the world, which he painted between 1912 and 1926. In 1928, on the 10th anniversary of the independence of Czechoslovakia, he presented the series to the Czech nation. He considered it his most important work. It is now on display in the national museum of Prague.

Mucha moved to Paris in 1888 where he enrolled in the Académie Julian and the following year, 1889, Académie Colarossi. The two schools taught a wide variety of different styles. His first professors at the Academie Julien were Jules Lefebvre who specialized in female nudes and allegorical paintings, and Jean-Paul Laurens, whose specialties were historical and religious paintings in a realistic and dramatic style. At the end of 1889, as he approached the age of thirty, his patron, Count Belasi, decided that Mucha had received enough education and ended his subsidies.

When he arrived in Paris, Mucha found shelter with the help of the large Slavic community. He lived in a boarding house called the Crémerie at 13 rue de la Grand Chaumerie, whose owner, Charlotte Caron, was famous for sheltering struggling artists; when needed she accepted paintings or drawings in place of rent. Mucha decided to follow the path of another Czech painter he knew from Munich, Ludek Marold, who had made a successful career as an illustrator for magazines. In 1890 and 1891, he began providing illustrations for the weekly magazine La Vie popular, which published novels in weekly segments. His illustration for a novel by Guy de Maupassant called The Useless Beauty, was on the cover of the 22 May 1890 edition.

His illustrations began to give him a regular income. He was able to buy a harmonium to continue his musical interests and his first camera, which used glass-plate negatives. He took pictures of himself and his friends, and also regularly used it to compose his drawings. He became friends with Paul Gauguin, and shared a studio with him for a time when Gauguin returned from Tahiti in the summer of 1893 In late autumn 1894 he also became friends with the playwright August Strindberg, with whom he had a common interest in philosophy and mysticism.

His magazine illustrations led to book illustration; he was commissioned to provide illustrations for Scenes and Episodes of German History by historian Charles Seignobos.Four of his illustrations, including one depicting the death of Frederic Barbarossa, were chosen for display at the 1894 Paris Salon of Artists. He received a medal of honor, his first official recognition.

Mucha added another important client in the early 1890s; the Central Library of Fine Arts, which specialized in the publication of books about art, architecture and the decorative arts. It later launched a new magazine in 1897 called Art et Decoration, which played an early and important role in publicizing the Art Nouveau style. He continued to publish illustrations for his other clients, including illustrating a children's book of poetry by Eugène Manuel, and illustrations for a magazine of the theater arts, called La Costume au théâtre.

In the political turmoil of the 1930s, Mucha's work received little attention in Czechoslovakia. However, in 1936 a major retrospective was held in Paris at the Jeu de Paume museum, with 139 works, including three canvases from the Slav Epic.

Hitler and Nazi Germany began to threaten Czechoslovakia in the 1930s. Mucha, began work on a new series, a triptych depicting the Age of Reason, the Age of Wisdom and the Age of Love, which he worked on from 1936 to 1938, but never completed. On March 15, 1939, the German army paraded through Prague, and Hitler, at Prague castle, declared the German Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia. Mucha's role as a Slav nationalist and Freemason made him a prime target. He was arrested, interrogated for several days, and released. By then his health was broken. He contracted and died of pneumonia on July 14, 1939, a few weeks before the outbreak of the Second World War. Though public gatherings were banned, a huge crowd attended his interment in the Slavin Monument of Vyšehrad cemetery, reserved for notable figures in Czech culture.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphonse_Mucha

Mucha Foundation
http://www.muchafoundation.org/
Mucha Museum in Prague
http://www.mucha.cz/index.phtml?S=home&Lang=EN

Thank you, please subscribe for future videos
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gMk3w9hw8BbtqoUpEMKeg?sub_confirmation=1

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