2018 Rolls-Royce Dawn 6.6T Interior and Exterior Overview

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2015 Rolls Royce Ghost Series 2 - Driven and Reviewed in South Africa

Let’s get this out of the way right now, the Rolls Royce Ghost, in South Africa, is absurdly expensive. Thanks to daft import duties, a car which costs around R3.5million in the United States, lands in SA at about R7million. And that’s before you hit the options list. With that in mind, I did my best to approach the Rolls as an object which might, might just be attainable, as opposed to something which is laughably, outlandishly, terrifyingly priced. Although that didn’t help when I was negotiating underground parking lots or Cape Town’s narrow side streets, when visions of paying off vast loans in lieu of a Roll’s fender filled my mind. The Ghost is easy to dismiss as an extremely fancy BMW 7 Series, as it shares some chassis architecture and some of the modern bits and pieces like the SatNav. But having driven both, the Rolls might as well have arrived from a different planet. On second thought, it feels like its arrived from a different time; a different era. We live in a world where companies who make microwaves take a look at the car market and decide they can make a profit. Many, many of the cars on our roads are built entirely robotically, and while this isn’t necessarily a bad thing - as cars are more reliable than ever - it is undeniably sad in some ways. I like to think the only robotic thing at Roll’s Royce HQ is the microwave. Each seat in the Ghost takes two weeks to stitch. I’m convinced the leather is sourced from those cows that are massaged everyday; it is impossibly soft. The red lines down the shoulder of our test unit are painted by hand, and would make any architect blush. All of this pales into comparison with how impressive the engine is. A 6.6 litre twin-turbo V12, it produces 420kW and 780Nm of torque, figures which are comprehensively beaten by cars like the Mercedes S 65 AMG Coupe, which we filmed here: But it is the way it delivers that power: all of the torque arrives at 1500rpm, which is practically at a standstill. And when it arrives, the Ghost quite literally leaps forward in a way that is as surprising as it is unsettling. This is a car which weighs 2.5 tonnes – 300kg more than a fully loaded Range Rover – and it hits 0 – 100km/h in 4.9 seconds. That’s the same time as the new BMW M135i. But when you’re not interested in dismissing German hot hatches at the lights, the Ghost is serene. Unbelievably quiet and comfortable, it really can be driven with 1 finger on the wheel. It is effortless. And that, I suppose, is how it should be. --Rolls Royce Ghost Series II Specs in South Africa-- Price: POA, starting at around R7million Engine: 6.6 litre 48v twin turbo V12 Power: 420kW at 5250rpm Torque: 780Nm at 1500rpm Acceleration: 0 – 100km/h in 4.9 seconds Top Speed: 250km/h (limited) Fuel consumption: 14 l/100km (very optimistic) -- Credits -- Written, Directed and Presented Ciro De Siena DOP Warrick Le Sueur Camera Tom Purcell Offline and Colour JJ Jordaan

2018 Changan CS75 PHEV SUV Interior and Exterior Overview

CHANGAN CS75 PHEV SUV is produced at Changan’s Beijing assembly plant. The Changan CS75 PHEV SUV is an all wheel drive vehicle with an 80kW electric motor on the front and 70kW on the rear axle. The Changan CS75 PHEV SUV with its 60km/38mi range competes with the BYD Song DM and SAIC Roewe’s eRX5. The Changan CS75 PHEV SUV is the result of the Chinese automakers tactic in its EV strategy to provide new energy versions of its most successful ICE vehicles.

Here's a Tour of a $350,000 Rolls-Royce Wraith

GO READ MY COLUMN: http://autotradr.co/Oversteer The Rolls-Royce Wraith is a $350,000 luxury coupe with some truly amazing luxury features and some unbelievable equipment -- along with an excellent driving experience. Here's a tour, and a review of what it's like to drive a Rolls-Royce Wraith. FOLLOW ME! Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/ddemuro Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/dougdemuro Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/dougdemuro DougScore DETAILS HERE! http://www.dougdemuro.com/uncategorized/welcome-to-the-dougscore/

Rolls-Royce Dawn Gunmetal and Silver Drive and Design

Rolls-Royce Dawn Gunmetal and Silver Exterior, Interior and Drive Subscribe The beating heart and soul of any Rolls-Royce motor car is the beloved twin-turbo 6.6-litre V12 powertrain. With a power output of 563bhp or 420kW @ 5,250rpm and a torque rating of 780Nm or 575 lb ft @ 1,500rpm, Dawn’s driving experience is exceptional. This experience is enhanced by dynamic accelerator pedal mapping which delivers up to 30% increased response at medium throttle. Dawn maintains Rolls-Royce’s typical steering characteristics providing superb driver feedback thereby ensuring that the car is effortless but precise to drive, while also providing a great sense of safety, even at higher speeds, no matter if the top is up or down. The result is that the new Dawn is Rolls-Royce’s most powerful full four-seat drophead motor car to date, and thanks to its advanced engineering is lighter and more fuel efficient than the majority of compromised 2+2 convertibles in the market. Grip is provided by runflat tyres, metrically sized at 540mm (20 inches) in diameter. These tyres enable the Dawn to run on a deflated tyre for at least 100 miles/160km at speeds up to 50mph/80km/h before needing a replacement. A remarkable level of control still exists, even with a tyre fully deflated. Optional 21” wheels are also available, mounted on 10-spoke rims. The inclusion of runflat tyre technology removes the need for a spare wheel and jack, freeing up space in the luggage compartment. The Rolls-Royce Dawn maintains timeless Rolls-Royce design principles – 2:1 wheel height to body height, a long bonnet, short front overhang, a long rear overhang, an elegant tapering rear graphic and a high shoulder line. All this tradition is delivered in a beautiful and thoroughly contemporary design. Like an athlete, Rolls-Royce Dawn appears poised, taught and ready to go. The latent acceleration and tension in the surfaces are increased through completely new panels which evince curvature that creates a tighter surface and a more powerful silhouette which hints at what lies beneath. Once again Rolls-Royce’s unique coach doors come into their own in a drophead format. The coach doors are impressive and graceful. The doors complement the long front wings and relaxed waft line, creating a long body profile and a cosseted cabin. Evocative of the classic sports car profile, they add considerably to the easy entry and egress of rear passengers from Dawn’s luxurious embrace. The rear passengers do not merely ‘get out’ of a Rolls-Royce Dawn, but rather stand and disembark as if from a Riva motor launch onto a glamorous private jetty in Monaco or on Lake Como. Of course as one would expect of a Rolls-Royce, the coach doors also serve a more fundamental purpose than simply a means of access. Perhaps just as importantly, they also add significantly to the overall strength and stiffness of the body as they allow the construction of an uninterrupted A-pillar. The first impression upon entering Dawn is of the four separate bucket seats set in the midst of a sumptuous and sartorial slingshot of wood and leather. The slingshot concept runs from the driver’s A-post towards the rear of the car, around the rear seats before returning to the passenger A-Pillar. Without question, the engineering highlight of the new Rolls-Royce Dawn is the new roof. To be a true Rolls-Royce, Dawn had to deliver the hushed driving experience associated with all Rolls-Royces. At the same time the only choice for a Rolls-Royce was a fabric roof for reasons of aesthetics, romance and brand appropriateness. There is nothing more romantic than driving a convertible in the rain at night and hearing the drops pattering on the roof. In conversation with its customers, Rolls-Royce realised that they felt the same way. Working with a fabric roof configuration, the Rolls-Royce engineering team set themselves a challenging goal which they were unwilling to compromise on – to make the quietest convertible car in the world today. This quest for silence applied to all aspects of the engineering of the new roof and by extension the new motor car. Firstly, the passengers’ on-board aural experience roof up and roof down while in motion had to be pure Rolls-Royce. The design of the roof had to be graceful, beautiful and sensuous whilst remaining one of the largest canopies to grace a convertible car. Of particular note is how the canopy wraps around the rear seats and down over the window tops of Dawn thereby optically lowering the roofline of the car to contribute to its low-slung appearance. Another point to note is the small size of the rear glass – a carefully-judged proportion which heightens the sense of a private sanctuary when motoring with the roof up.

2018 Rolls Royce Dawn Homage Edition - Exterior and Interior Walkaround - 2018 Montreal Auto Show

Welcome to AutoMotoTube!!! On our channel we upload daily, our original, short, Car and Motorcycle walkaround videos. We are specialized in doing coverage from the Biggest Auto and Motorcycle shows around the world - Geneva, Frankfurt, Paris, Detroit, Tokyo, New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, EICMA Milan, AIMExpo Orlando etc… Our Channel is the best place to see all World Debuts and Concept Cars, the day they are revealed to the public. In addition, we have walkaround videos of all new car and motorcycle model, super cars, custom, tuning, hot rods, classic and vintage cars. In most of our HD 1080p 60fps videos, we take a look at the exterior design and interior arrangements of the vehicle, so you can receive a general idea and appreciation of a certain brand or model. We really appreciate all your comments and critics - they help a lot, in building our original Auto & Motorcycle walkaround video, YouTube collection!!! Thanks for watching and stay tuned! A lot more to come... Subscription link for our Channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=automototube , and don’t forget to browse our huge playlist collection P.S: If you have chance, have a look at our other channels: https://www.youtube.com/c/motorcycletube - MotorCycleTube - Only motorcycle Walkaround Videos https://www.youtube.com/c/BoatTube - BoatTube - Motor Boats and Sailing yachts Walkaround Videos https://www.youtube.com/c/Bicycletube - BicycleTube - Bicycle Walkaround Videos https://www.youtube.com/c/atvtube - ATVTube - All Terrain Vehicle Walkaround Videos , or check out our web site: http://www.automototube.net - there we have our videos and some pictures organized by brands You can find us on our official facebook, twitter and google+ pages: http://www.facebook.com/automototube http://www.twitter.com/automototube http://plus.google.com/113313843581025899562/post

The ‘one new model a year’ expansion of Rolls-Royce continues.

The world’s most recognisable name in luxury motoring now comprises, depending on your generosity, as many as seven models.
The Phantom accounts for four of those and Rolls happily accepts that: saloon, long-wheelbase saloon, coupé and convertible.

But then there’s the smaller, cheaper Ghost, although such things are relative. The Ghost’s derivatives are perceived by Rolls to be individual models rather than variants.

There’s the Wraith coupé, a car that Rolls can’t quite bring itself to call sporting yet it is as dynamic as you’d want a Rolls to be, and now there’s this.

It’s called the Dawn and Rolls says it “is not a Wraith drophead”.

It would be perfectly natural to think of it as a convertible version of the Wraith. The two share the same platform and all but the same mechanicals.

But Rolls, we suppose, is intending you to think of the Dawn as a model in its own right, because it wants the Dawn to have a character of its own right.

Not for the Dawn the dynamism of the Wraith; instead, this car is meant to be “the most social” of luxury dropheads – it has four seats, not 2+2 seats – for those “who wish to bathe in the sunlight of the world’s most exclusive social hotspots”.

Just in case you think Rolls-Royce hasn’t quite finished beating eggs into this particular pudding, it says the Dawn is, no less, “the sexiest Rolls-Royce ever built”.

Whatever, it’s certainly the soft-roofed Dawn that’ll be built in the biggest numbers.

The Silver Dawn of the early 1950s was the first Rolls for which the factory built its own body, but convertible versions remained coachbuilt – and only 28 were made between 1950 and 1954. That was unequivocally a convertible version of another car.

Whether this Dawn owes its character to another Rolls or not is what we’re here to discover.
The Dawn is not a Wraith drop-top, remember, although it does use the same BMW-based architecture.

It has the same wheelbase and the same twin-turbocharged 6.6-litre V12 engine driving through the same eight-speed automatic gearbox.
Nonetheless, experience has shown us that it’s still possible to give broadly similar cars very different characters. And although the Dawn is intended to have a character that’s different from the Wraith’s, to our mind the Dawn will have an even greater need to feel different from the Phantom Drophead Coupé.

From the off, then, it’s worth noting that the Dawn makes rather a lot less power than the Wraith. The engine comes in Ghost output, at 563bhp at 5250rpm and 575lb ft at 1500rpm, some way shy of the Wraith’s 624bhp and 590lb ft.

It’s still Rolls-Royce’s most powerful drophead, though. The Phantom drophead’s larger-capacity 6.75-litre V12 makes 110bhp less and suggests that the bigger car is an altogether more relaxed performer again: a 5.6-metre-long pseudo-limousine with a 2630kg kerb weight.

When we say the Dawn is smaller and lighter than that, though, these things are relative. If Rolls-Royce hadn’t managed to fit four full seats into a 5285mm length, you’d have to ask questions. And forgoing the Phantom’s aluminium architecture, the Dawn still officially tips the scales at 2560kg.

That’s due in part to the sheer size of the hardware, but also to the amount of luxury the car is asked to carry; an electrically adjustable seat with the amount of plush that Rolls throws at it can weigh 100kg or more.

Then there’s the roof. Rolls says it’s the quietest open-top car yet made – quieter even than the Phantom drophead.

And it opens in 20 seconds, at vehicle speeds of up to 31mph, in as near to silence as Rolls can manage. Which means, without question, that it’s heavy – as is the wood-finished deck that rises and closes above or below it when it’s down or up.

Suspension settings for the air springs and active anti-roll bars are different from those of the Ghost and Wraith, and they are aimed at giving the Dawn a character of its own while also compensating for its reduced torsional rigidity, a direct result of the removal of a fixed roof.

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