2018 Rolls-Royce Dawn 6.6T Interior and Exterior Overview

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Here's a Tour of a $350,000 Rolls-Royce Wraith

GO READ MY COLUMN: http://autotradr.co/Oversteer The Rolls-Royce Wraith is a $350,000 luxury coupe with some truly amazing luxury features and some unbelievable equipment -- along with an excellent driving experience. Here's a tour, and a review of what it's like to drive a Rolls-Royce Wraith. FOLLOW ME! Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/ddemuro Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/dougdemuro Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/dougdemuro DougScore DETAILS HERE! http://www.dougdemuro.com/uncategorized/welcome-to-the-dougscore/

How do you buy a Rolls-Royce?

Taking a look inside the Rolls-Royce Commissioning Suite, customers are provided with the power to create their very own car. With an array of interchangeable colours, leathers, and personally designed emblems, Rolls-Royce truly allow for complete customization. Even the famous Rolls-Royce umbrella can be customized too. #gwfuture

Rolls-Royce Craftsmanship

Discover how the combination of traditional craftsmanship and the latest technology make Rolls-Royce cars so special.

2019 Rolls Royce Wraith Excellent interior

Rolls-Royce Wraith When Rolls-Royce Motor Cars came to update its Phantom family of models, the words of company co-founder Sir Henry Royce informed everything that designers, engineers and craftspeople set out to achieve: Take the best that exists and make it better. This historic cri de coeur came to represent the significant improvements made to the marque's pinnacle cars when launched in 2012, and continues to resontate strongly from the design studios to the assembly hall at the Home of Rolls-Royce at Goodwood today. But that was only part of Royce's famous quote. Take the best that exists and make it better: when it does not exist design it. These words informed the development of Rolls-Royce Wraith: nothing like it existed in the Rolls-Royce portfolio, nor the wider automotive world. The expression of when it does not exist, design it is steeped in Rolls-Royce heritage. It can be seen in the pioneering spirit and vehicles that defined the company in the early 20th century. Adventures that took place on land, sea and in the air, that once led Rolls-Royce to three consecutive world speed records. And of course there was the company's founding forefather, the Honourable Charles Rolls, a man whose appetite for adventure drove him to success in motor racing, ballooning and aviation. He became the first man in history to cross the English Channel and return without stopping in a powered aircraft, an achievement that earned him the highest praise of King George V. Luxurious interior Rolls-Royce Wraith's coach doors open to present an inviting, harmonious interior space - one with every possible comfort, delivered in a thoroughly modern way. The eye is immediately drawn to the contemporary panelling that elegantly adorns the inside of the doors and sweeps round the entire lower space. Finished in either wood or leather, the effect draws the eye quickly around the cabin, similar in dynamic effect to the clean fastback style of the exterior. Canadel Panelling Wraith's mellow interior is the perfect space to present the debut of a very special new wood treatment , Canadel Panelling, a beautiful open grain wood. Tactile and with a light satin finish that retains the material's natural texture, this crafted wood contributes to the cabin's warm, contemporary ambiance, evoking the interior feel of a fine, super-luxury yacht. In this wood configuration, the car stands as a testament to the skills of craftspeople in the wood shop at the home of Rolls-Royce in Goodwood, England. Every detail has been carefully considered; the veneer gently curved to hug the contours of the doors, delighting the eye as well as increasing space for occupants. In orientation the grain is angled at 55 degrees increasing dynamic flow through the interior. Echoing the wood craftsmanship of its pinnacle stable mate Phantom, Canadel Panelling is bookmatched throughout, creating a perfect mirror image through the centre console and featuring a contemporary chevron pattern that runs through the centre of the car, adding to the sense of cutting edge dynamic. Dynamism... and delicacy The dynamic theme is reinforced when viewed from the driver's seat. Black chrome dials are framed by a black horseshoe sweep. Blood orange tips to gauge indicators pay homage to the marque's aviation heritage whilst the steering-wheel is thicker rimmed to build dynamic intent. Detailed with a delicate subtlety, the interior complements Wraith's dramatic exterior aesthetic. Four individual seats cosset driver and occupants ensuring the most involving Rolls-Royce driving experience ever, whilst never compromising on pinnacle standards of comfort and contemporary elegance. Touches like the chrome bullet tips to recessed piping on the seat panels further enhances the sense of a vehicle tailored for performance. The finest Phantom-grade natural grain leather adds to the luxury, its tactility unequalled in the motor industry. Detailing to armrests and panniers reinforce the opulence, inspired in their design by fine saddle-making. Light from darkness The Rolls-Royce principle of effortlessness has informed designers' thinking throughout. Perfectly appointed storage compartments for two iPads add convenience for rear seat passengers, whilst automatic door closing buttons located behind the a-pillar aid those in the front. Warm and serene, Wraith's interior lighting bathes occupants in gentle light. Beyond this, additional ambient lighting comes on request - courtesy of reading lights above c-pillars and waterfall roof lights that deliver increased but unobtrusive illumination with a hint of Art Deco influence. Full Review https://www.netcarshow.com/rolls-royce/2014-wraith/#7 "SUBSCRIBE NOW"

The £10 MILLION Rolls-Royce Sweptail is the MOST EXPENSIVE New Car EVER!

The Rolls-Royce Sweptail is modern day coachbuilding at its finest, and it's also the most expensive new car ever with an estimated price tag of £10 million. There will only be one Sweptail built and here it is to take a look around. The lucky owner of the car has spent 4-5 years working closely with Rolls-Royce to create the Sweptail, a totally bespoke commission and a one-off product. Based upon the Rolls-Royce Phantom VII Coupe with a 6.75l V12 it features numerous special touches along with the styling of traditional 1930s Rolls-Royces. The Sweptail includes a champagne bottle ready in the central armrest, a hat shelf behind the front occupants, umbrella and laptop bag stowed in the door arches, a crystal Spirit of Ecstasy and the largest panoramic glass roof used on a road car. Those are just some of the special features on the Sweptail, but when you look up more closely you can see the simplicity of the interior dashboard, the curvaceous nature of the panels wrapping the edges of the exterior and the fastback style rear hatch. On the Rolls-Royce stand behind we can take a look at the new Dawn Black Badge, a car that raises the stakes for the ultimate convertible cruiser. With more power, visually aggressive highlights and oozing style, it's quite something! Thanks for watching, Tim Subscribe: http://bit.ly/Shmee150YT Website: http://www.shmee150.com Facebook: http://www.fb.com/shmee150 Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/shmee150

The ‘one new model a year’ expansion of Rolls-Royce continues.

The world’s most recognisable name in luxury motoring now comprises, depending on your generosity, as many as seven models.
The Phantom accounts for four of those and Rolls happily accepts that: saloon, long-wheelbase saloon, coupé and convertible.

But then there’s the smaller, cheaper Ghost, although such things are relative. The Ghost’s derivatives are perceived by Rolls to be individual models rather than variants.

There’s the Wraith coupé, a car that Rolls can’t quite bring itself to call sporting yet it is as dynamic as you’d want a Rolls to be, and now there’s this.

It’s called the Dawn and Rolls says it “is not a Wraith drophead”.

It would be perfectly natural to think of it as a convertible version of the Wraith. The two share the same platform and all but the same mechanicals.

But Rolls, we suppose, is intending you to think of the Dawn as a model in its own right, because it wants the Dawn to have a character of its own right.

Not for the Dawn the dynamism of the Wraith; instead, this car is meant to be “the most social” of luxury dropheads – it has four seats, not 2+2 seats – for those “who wish to bathe in the sunlight of the world’s most exclusive social hotspots”.

Just in case you think Rolls-Royce hasn’t quite finished beating eggs into this particular pudding, it says the Dawn is, no less, “the sexiest Rolls-Royce ever built”.

Whatever, it’s certainly the soft-roofed Dawn that’ll be built in the biggest numbers.

The Silver Dawn of the early 1950s was the first Rolls for which the factory built its own body, but convertible versions remained coachbuilt – and only 28 were made between 1950 and 1954. That was unequivocally a convertible version of another car.

Whether this Dawn owes its character to another Rolls or not is what we’re here to discover.
The Dawn is not a Wraith drop-top, remember, although it does use the same BMW-based architecture.

It has the same wheelbase and the same twin-turbocharged 6.6-litre V12 engine driving through the same eight-speed automatic gearbox.
Nonetheless, experience has shown us that it’s still possible to give broadly similar cars very different characters. And although the Dawn is intended to have a character that’s different from the Wraith’s, to our mind the Dawn will have an even greater need to feel different from the Phantom Drophead Coupé.

From the off, then, it’s worth noting that the Dawn makes rather a lot less power than the Wraith. The engine comes in Ghost output, at 563bhp at 5250rpm and 575lb ft at 1500rpm, some way shy of the Wraith’s 624bhp and 590lb ft.

It’s still Rolls-Royce’s most powerful drophead, though. The Phantom drophead’s larger-capacity 6.75-litre V12 makes 110bhp less and suggests that the bigger car is an altogether more relaxed performer again: a 5.6-metre-long pseudo-limousine with a 2630kg kerb weight.

When we say the Dawn is smaller and lighter than that, though, these things are relative. If Rolls-Royce hadn’t managed to fit four full seats into a 5285mm length, you’d have to ask questions. And forgoing the Phantom’s aluminium architecture, the Dawn still officially tips the scales at 2560kg.

That’s due in part to the sheer size of the hardware, but also to the amount of luxury the car is asked to carry; an electrically adjustable seat with the amount of plush that Rolls throws at it can weigh 100kg or more.

Then there’s the roof. Rolls says it’s the quietest open-top car yet made – quieter even than the Phantom drophead.

And it opens in 20 seconds, at vehicle speeds of up to 31mph, in as near to silence as Rolls can manage. Which means, without question, that it’s heavy – as is the wood-finished deck that rises and closes above or below it when it’s down or up.

Suspension settings for the air springs and active anti-roll bars are different from those of the Ghost and Wraith, and they are aimed at giving the Dawn a character of its own while also compensating for its reduced torsional rigidity, a direct result of the removal of a fixed roof.

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