2018 Zotye Traum Meet3 SUV Full Car Overview

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2018 Zotye Traum S70 Luxury Interior and Exterior Overview

ZOTYE LAUNCHES THE TRAUM S70 SUV FOR CHINA The Traum S70 SUV is ready, it will be launched on the Chinese car market in January. Price will range from about 90.000 to 130.000 yuan. Traum is a new brand under Zotye Auto. Traum means dream in German. The Traum brand is aimed at young and cool people. The Chinese name has nothing with dreams of Germany; Junma (君马) is best translated as Supreme Horse. The English slogan is Driven by Dreams. The Chinese slogan, translated, Dream for a Horse. Interestingly, the Traum-branded cars are manufactured by Jiangnan Auto, a subsidiary of Zotye most famous for building China’s cheapest car; the Jinan Alto, a continuation of the ancient second generation Suzuki Alto The Traum S70 is an interesting car, mixing elements of SUV and MPV. There will be five-seat and seven-seat versions. Size: 4746/1882/1700, and wheelbase is 2800. Engines: 116 hp 1.6 and a 156 hp 1.5 turbo. ‘Boxes: 5-speed manual or 6-speed automatic. The party-piece of the Traum S70 is the dashboard with a massive instrument panel-touch screen combination. Traum claims a combined diameter of 25 inch, but they are really two separate screens, so that is not entirely fair. The instrument panel appears to be about 10 inch, and the central touch screen probably 12 inch.

2018 Kia Sportage Compact SUV 4x4 Luxury Full Car Overview

The 2018 Kia Sportage has typically been an "alternative" choice for a compact crossover SUV. Prior versions weren't as well-rounded as other, more popular crossovers, but a lower price, plentiful standard features and lengthy warranty helped get people into the driver's seat. Well, those value-oriented attributes are still present, but the 2018 Kia Sportage, coming off last year's full redesign, is improved to the point that it deserves to be among those SUVs you consider first rather than the one you settle on after looking at the price tag. For starters, it's a more refined and comfortable vehicle than previous versions. Its ride quality is impressively comfortable, even with bigger wheels, and its cabin stays nice and quiet on the highway. Interior quality is also better than most, and it looks good, too. Other advantages include a big back seat and large doors that make it easy to get in and out. If you are looking for lots of utility, the Sportage probably isn't the right choice. You get 30.7 cubic feet of space behind the rear seatbacks, which trails class leaders by about 4 to 6 cubic feet, while folding down those seatbacks opens up a similarly modest 60.1 cubic feet. The Sportage's fuel economy is also disappointing compared to rival SUVs. Still, you don't need to spend a lot of money to get an appealing Sportage. Even the base trim level is well equipped, and unlike some rivals, you don't have to step up to an upper trim to get desirable things such as advanced safety tech and Apple or Android smartphone control. So, yes, the Sportage is just as much of a value-packed alternative as always, but it's also good enough now to be in the big leagues. For 2018, the base LX gets new stain-resistant cloth upholstery and a greater variety of optional equipment. The EX trim gains standard equipment, including blind-spot and rear cross-traffic alert systems. There's also a new EX Sport Appearance package and the SX Turbo includes an electronic parking brake. The 2018 Kia Sportage is a five-passenger compact crossover SUV available in LX, EX and SX Turbo trim levels. Front-wheel drive is standard on all of them, but all-wheel drive is an option. The LX and EX have a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 181 horsepower and 175 pound-feet of torque. The SX Turbo has a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder that produces 240 hp (237 hp with all-wheel drive) and 260 lb-ft of torque. Standard equipment on the LX includes 17-inch alloy wheels, automatic headlights, rear privacy glass, driver-selectable driving modes, a height-adjustable driver seat, a 60/40-split folding and reclining back seat, a rearview camera, a 5-inch touchscreen display, Bluetooth, and a six-speaker sound system with satellite radio, a CD player and one USB port. The LX's Popular package adds roof rails, UV-reducing glass for the front windows and windshield, a windshield wiper de-icer, dual-zone automatic climate control, an eight-way power-adjustable driver seat (with power lumbar), heated front seats, and Kia's 7-inch Uvo touchscreen interface that includes Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, and Kia's eServices remote and emergency services. The EX includes all of the above items plus 18-inch wheels, foglights, heated mirrors, upgraded exterior and interior trim, keyless ignition and entry, blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, leather upholstery and a rear USB charging port. The EX's Premium package adds a panoramic sunroof, a heated steering wheel and an auto-dimming rearview mirror. The Sport Appearance package adds LED foglights, special exterior trim and a flat-bottom steering wheel. It is not available with the Premium or Technology (see below) packages. The LX Technology package adds forward collision warning and automatic braking, blind-spot and rear cross-traffic warning systems, lane departure warning, automatic high-beam control and power-folding mirrors. The EX Technology package adds those items plus a hands-free liftgate, front and rear parking sensors, a spare tire, an eight-way power-adjustable passenger seat, an 8-inch touchscreen, a navigation system and an eight-speaker Harman Kardon sound system. This package includes heated rear seats with all-wheel-drive Sportages. The SX gets a more powerful engine plus a sport-tuned suspension, 19-inch wheels, xenon headlights, LED foglights, an electronic parking brake, special exterior trim, the flat-bottom steering wheel, a larger gauge display, and the contents of the EX Technology and Premium packages.

2018 Haval H9 Ultra AWD Luxury New Car Overview

Competing against Toyota’s ubiquitous LandCruiser Prado, Hyundai Santa Fe and Kia Sorento, the Chinese-made Haval H9 arrives refreshed for 2018 with locally-tuned steering and suspension. The MY18 revision also adds grunt increased safety technology. Retailing from $41,990 (plus on-road costs) the H9 is cheaper than its predecessor, and also better equipped. But is it enough to give the petrol-only seven-seater a leg-up on Australia’s favourite SUVs? When we first drove the Haval H9 on Aussie soil back in 2016 it was obvious the up-and-coming marque was in need of a little polish. On paper it ticked a lot of boxes – it was very well-equipped and it certainly had price on its side – but was in need of a little work where steering, suspension and electronic chassis controls were concerned; three key changes Haval has made to this MY18 update. The family-sized H9 SUV continues to offer seating for seven and dual-range four-wheel drive, and in this respect it competes directly with the likes of the Ford Everest and Toyota LandCruiser Prado. But with only a 180kW/350Nm 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbo-petrol engine under the bonnet (up 20kW/26Nm for 2018), the H9’s touring range and low-end grunt are still noticeably shy of gutsier turbo-diesel rivals. Of course, not every H9 owner will want to tackle the Canning Stock Route, but with a 10 per cent improvement in fuel consumption – assisted by the inclusion of idle-stop technology and a new eight-speed ZF-sourced 8HP70 automatic transmission – the H9’s theoretical cruising range of just over 700km now gives it half a chance. Add to that a now-standard All-Terrain Control System (ATCS) on both model grades and the H9’s off-road potential is greatly improved. The six-mode system – Auto, Sand, Snow, Mud, 4L and Sport – adapts to the prevailing conditions, and combines with ground clearance of 206mm and a wading depth of 700mm for class-competitive ability. Haval lists the H9’s approach, break-over and departure angles at 28, 23 and 23 degrees respectively. Braked towing capacity is rated at 2500kg. Haval has also addressed concerns surrounding the vehicle’s ride, handling and steering. In conjunction with Australian off-road specialists Ironman 4X4 it has developed heavier springs, upgraded shock absorber valving and minor changes to toe-in to make the H9 better suited to Australian conditions. The H9 now also includes blind-spot monitoring, lane-departure warning and rear cross-traffic alert as standard to bolster safety. Although it still misses out on autonomous emergency braking and active cruise control – changes expected in an update later this year – the six airbags (including full-length side curtains), Bosch-sourced stability and traction control, driver fatigue monitoring, hill-descent control, hill-hold assist, tyre-pressure monitoring, and anti-lock brakes with brake assist are notable inclusions. The H9 last received a four-star ANCAP safety rating when tested in 2015. Haval expects a five-star result when the H9 is retested later this year. For occasional four-wheel drivers wanting the city-focussed luxuries, the H9 offers plenty. It now features five-spoke 18-inch alloy wheels, Haval’s all-terrain control four-wheel drive system with electronic rear differential lock, electrochromatic rear-view mirror, and a power socket located in the centre armrest on LUX variants (from $41,990 drive-away). The new up-spec H9 Ultra (from $45,990 drive-away) gains a panoramic roof, heated steering wheel, Comfort-Tek eco-leather upholstery (heated in the first and second row), and an Infinity premium audio system. Haval offers the H9 with a five-year/100,000km warranty and included roadside assistance program. Service intervals are set at six months/10,000km intervals (whichever comes first) with a Service Price Menu akin to capped-price servicing available – though oddly detailed only at Haval dealerships and not on the company’s website.

2018 Haval H6 SUV is The Best Chinese SUV Car Yet - Full Overview

If you’ve not heard of the Haval H6, you’re probably not alone. In fact, if you didn’t even know that Haval was a thing, you’re still probably in the majority. The Chinese maker and its medium-sized H6 SUV are here to compete with the big players. The H6 fights in the largest segment of the SUV market, against the likes of the Mazda CX-5, Toyota RAV4, Hyundai Tucson, Honda CR-V, Nissan X-Trail and all of those other very impressive, family friendly offerings. With two trim levels available, and aggressive pricing on both the entry-grade Premium and top-spec Lux tested here, the Haval H6 seemingly has something to make it stand out in the Australian market, offering customers who want a lot of car for their cash an alternative to the entry-level grades of the mainstream Korean and Japanese players. But in the midst of fierce competition, ever-sharpening prices and the continually expanding equipment lists of base model SUVs, is there really a place for this Chinese model? Until recently, the Haval H6 definitely offered truly good value for money. At launch it arrived with a base price of $31,990 drive-away for the entry-level Premium and $34,990 drive-away for this Lux version. But since then, there has been a lot of new model activity in the medium-SUV segment, and some hallmark players have added kit and dropped prices to boost sales and maintain relevance. The Premium comes with 17-inch alloy wheels, fog-lights, auto headlights and wipers, laser puddle lights, heated auto-folding side mirrors, tinted glass, roof-rails, cruise control, mood lighting, stainless-steel scuff plates, electric driver’s seat adjustment, fabric seat trim, dual-zone climate control, keyless entry and push-button start, and an 8.0-inch touchscreen multimedia unit with Bluetooth phone and audio streaming and USB input. The Lux adds a panoramic sunroof, heated front and rear seats, power-adjustable passenger seat, fake leather trim, its sound system gains a sub-woofer, and it has better headlights - xenon units with auto levelling - plus 19-inch wheels. There are seven colours to choose from, six of which are metallics that attract a $495 premium. Buyers can even choose between a range of different coloured interiors; the Premium has the choice of black or grey/black, while the Lux has black, grey/black or brown/black. And there are deals to be had. The H6 Premium can now be had at $29,990 drive-away with free sat nav (usually $990 more) and a $500 gift card. You’ll get the Lux for $33,990 drive-away. The H6 doesn’t have sat nav fitted as standard in any spec, and Apple CarPlay/Android Auto phone mirroring technology isn’t available at all. Safety kit is respectable, if not class-leading, with a reversing camera, front and rear parking sensors, six airbags, dual ISOFIX child-seat attachment points (and three top-tether hooks), and blind-spot monitoring included in both variants. It doesn’t look very much like the other models in Haval’s range, and that’s a good thing. The H2, H8 and H9 all have the rounded edges of yesteryear, where the H6 is sharper, smarter, more sophisticated. It looks more European than Chinese, to my eye. The proportions of the Haval H6 are quite fetching - the brand, cheekily, labels it the H6 Coupe in its home market. It has lines in the right places, a shapely silhouette and a pert backside, all of which combine to give it a certain presence on the road. It is more stylish than a few of its class compatriots, that’s for sure. And the Lux model rolls on 19-inch wheels, which certainly help in that regard. The interior, though, isn’t as amazing, despite looking inviting. There’s a lot of fake wood and hard plastic, and it doesn’t have the ergonomic intelligence of the better SUVs in the class. The swooping roofline makes for difficult rearward vision, too, with a letterbox rear windscreen and thick D-pillars.

ZOTYE T600 Sport 2018

ZOTYE T600 Sport 2018 يمكنكم الاطلاع على تفاصيل السيارة عبر http://souqofcars.com/Car/853

Zotye is working on a new brand called ‘Traum‘, and that means dream in German. The brand will focus on young car buyers. They will attack the market with two cars: the Traum S70 compact SUV and a small SUV formerly known by its code name A2.

We now know the real name: MEET3. ‘Meet’ as in to meet a penguin, 3 as in one two three. I am not sure what is means together, it isn’t very catchy, but it is certainly different. The Traum Meet3. Yes. Maybe we will get used to it.
The MEET3 looks a bit like a Mercedes-Benz GLA with some Audi and Volkswagen thrown in the mix. And that is because the MEET3 is based on the Zotye SR7, which is pretty good clone of the Audi Q3:
The Traum MEET3 got a new front and a new rear, and will have big touch screen, because those damn youngsters like that kinda fansy stuff. The engine comes straight out if the SR7 too: a 1.5 turbo with 152 hp and 195 Nm, mated to a 5-speed manual or a CVT. This engine powers every other Zotye SUV and most of the sedans too.

The MEET3 will hit the Chinese car market in December for about 70.000 yuan.
Interestingly, the Traum-branded cars are manufactured by Jiangnan Auto, a subsidiary of Zotye most famous for building China’s cheapest car; the Jinan Alto, a continuation of the ancient second generation Suzuki Alto.

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