How to paint like Willem de Kooning | IN THE STUDIO

author The Museum of Modern Art   2 год. назад
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How to paint like Willem de Kooning - Part 2 | IN THE STUDIO

Continue to explore the multi-layered techniques of Willem de Kooning with Corey D'Augustine in the second part of How to Paint like Willem de Kooning | IN THE STUDIO. Click here for Part 1 of How to Paint like Willem de Kooning | IN THE STUDIO: https://youtu.be/r7sJ_WNiSrs Explore the techniques of other New York School painters like Kusama, Rothko, and Pollock in MoMA's new free, online course, "In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Painting." Sign up: http://mo.ma/inthestudio Subscribe for our latest videos: http://mo.ma/subscribe Explore our collection online: http://mo.ma/art Plan your visit in-person: http://mo.ma/visit Commit to art and ideas. Support MoMA by becoming a member today: https://moma.org/join Over the course of a career lasting nearly seven decades, de Kooning would work through a wide array of styles, eventually cementing himself as a crucial link from New York School painting to European modernism. Physical labor and countless revisions were constants in his work, which ranged from abstraction to figuration, often merging the two. “I never was interested in how to make a good painting…,” he once said. “I didn’t work on it with the idea of perfection, but to see how far one could go…” The female figure was an especially fertile subject for the artist. His paintings of women were among his most controversial works during his lifetime and continue to be debated today. — Education at MoMA is made possible by a partnership with Volkswagen of America. Featuring Corey D'Augustine, Educator and Independent Conservator. The comments and opinions expressed in this video are those of the speaker alone, and do not represent the views of The Museum of Modern Art, its personnel, or any artist.  #art #moma #museum #modernart #artist #paint #painting #howtopaint #learntopaint #abstract #dekooning #willemdekooning #abstractart #modernism #modernist

10 Most Expensive Paintings Ever Sold

- Welcome to TopTenChannel! SUBSCRIBE now for more videos. - Follow us on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1K6HkHz These 10 paintings are the World's most expensive ones. List: 10. Three Studies of Lucian Freud – $145 million 9. Portrait of Dr. Gachet – $152 million 8. Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I – $158.4 million 7. Le Rêve – $158.5 million 6. Woman III – $162.4 million 5. No. 5, 1948 – $165.4 million 4. Women of Algiers – $179.3 million 3. No. 6 (Violet, Green and Red) – $186 million 2. The Card Players – $274 million 1. When Will You Marry? – $300 million

Worst Mistake Acrylic Painters Make

Do you know how much water is OK to add to your acrylics? Ever heard of the term "underbinding". Michele explains what the art conservators know, but most artists have never been taught -- how much water can be added to the paint without destabilizing the paint film. Learn more about gloss medium here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUFDlpYGcNI Series on Stain Painting: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFNvPfOa2yC63z3BHF-kN4c5aYJ-1l5st I got an email from someone recently (July 2016) saying he couldn't find the Liquitex airbrush medium, for your convenience I am posting an amazon affiliate link here: https://goo.gl/DcpEkY Most larger art supply stores will have it or if they already carry Liquitex brand they can order it for you. Here is a link for Gloss Medium as well: https://goo.gl/dr23He http://www.micheletheberge.com ::art inspired by meditation, daily life & nature connection:: http://www.themindfulartist.com ::commit yourself more fully to your art practice:: a pocketful of inspiration & encouragement for you! My book "Seven Essential Practices for the Professional Artist” is on Amazon http://goo.gl/ngnDI instagram: http://instagram.com/micheletheberge facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Michele-Th%C3%A9berge-artist/141639189231397 twitter: https://twitter.com/MicheleTheberge

1/6 The Rules Of Abstraction With Matthew Collings

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bg3oQ_OqQ_o&list=PLM4S2hGZDSE5SOht-nruKVOvuR5lrCw2T&index=1 First broadcast: Sep 2014. Documentary in which painter and critic Matthew Collings charts the rise of abstract art over the last 100 years, whilst trying to answer a set of basic questions that many people have about this often-baffling art form. How do we respond to abstract art when we see it? Is it supposed to be hard or easy? When abstract artists chuck paint about with abandon, what does it mean? Does abstract art stand for something or is it supposed to be understood as just itself? These might be thought of as unanswerable questions, but by looking at key historical figures and exploring the private world of abstract artists today, Collings shows that there are, in fact, answers. Living artists in the programme create art in front of the camera using techniques that seem outrageously free, but through his friendly-yet-probing interview style Collings immediately establishes that the work always has a firm rationale. When Collings visits 92-year-old Bert Irvin in his studio in Stepney, east London he finds that the colourful works continue experiments in perceptual ideas about colour and space first established by abstract art pioneers such as Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky in the 1910s. Other historic artists featured in the programme include the notorious Jackson Pollock, the maker of drip paintings, and Mark Rothko, whose abstractions often consist of nothing but large expanses of red. Collings explains the inner structure of such works. It turns out there are hidden rules to abstraction that viewers of this intriguing, groundbreaking programme may never have expected.

Mel McCuddin - Figurative Expressionist

A seven minute look at how Mel McCuddin creates his unique paintings with a series of oil painting techniques where Mel "finds the image" within the abstract expressionist "underpainting" that he makes first. This process creates a spontaneity that leads to some very interesting results.

Learn how to paint like Willem de Kooning, one of the key artists of the postwar Abstract Expressionist style, also referred to as "action painting," with IN THE STUDIO instructor Corey D'Augustine.

Explore the techniques of other New York School painters like Kusama, Rothko, and Pollock in MoMA's new free, online course, "In the Studio: Postwar Abstract Painting." Sign up: http://mo.ma/inthestudio

Subscribe for our latest videos: http://mo.ma/subscribe
Explore our collection online: http://mo.ma/art
Plan your visit in-person: http://mo.ma/visit
Commit to art and ideas. Support MoMA by becoming a member today: https://moma.org/join

Over the course of a career lasting nearly seven decades, de Kooning would work through a wide array of styles, eventually cementing himself as a crucial link from New York School painting to European modernism.

Physical labor and countless revisions were constants in his work, which ranged from abstraction to figuration, often merging the two. “I never was interested in how to make a good painting…,” he once said. “I didn’t work on it with the idea of perfection, but to see how far one could go…”

The female figure was an especially fertile subject for the artist. His paintings of women were among his most controversial works during his lifetime and continue to be debated today.



After conversations with The Willem de Kooning Foundation, MoMA would like to share the following corrections with our viewers:

Though many of de Kooning’s paintings have very thick surfaces relative to more traditionally approached paintings, there is no evidence of any painting that has close to the 2 inch thick surface that our video indicates.

There is no evidence that de Kooning ever had or used a six foot long brush as indicated in the video. Long brushes were given to de Kooning as gifts, and he likely experimented with them. However, he did not regularly use them. It appears instead that de Kooning often used shorter brushes, such as house painters’ brushes, and regularly walked away from the canvas to look at it from a distance.

De Kooning used underdrawings as starting points to generate ideas to explore in painting as opposed to as warming up exercise as indicated in the video.



Education at MoMA is made possible by a partnership with Volkswagen of America.

Featuring Corey D'Augustine, Educator and Independent Conservator.

The comments and opinions expressed in this video are those of the speaker alone, and do not represent the views of The Museum of Modern Art, its personnel, or any artist. 

#art #moma #museum #modernart #artist #paint #painting #howtopaint #learntopaint #abstract #dekooning #willemdekooning #abstractart #modernism #modernist

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