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author Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen   6 год. назад
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David Hockney, The Lost Secrets of the Old Masters: camera lucida obscura

http://AncientMagicArtTools.com A Very interesting interview with David Hockney, where he explains and demonstrates the use of camera obscuras and camera lucidas in the artwork of the Old Masters chronicled in his book Secret Knowledge: Rediscovering the Lost Techniques of the Old Masters.

Jan Gossart - Conservation Discoveries

Learn more about the exhibition Man, Myth, and Sensual Pleasures: Jan Gossart's Renaissance on view at the Met October 6, 2010--January 17, 2011: http://tinyurl.com/JanGossart The first major exhibition in forty-five years devoted to the Burgundian Netherlandish artist Jan Gossart (ca. 1478-1532) will bring together Gossart's paintings, drawings, and prints and place them in the context of the art and artists that influenced his transformation from Late Gothic Mannerism to the new Renaissance mode. Gossart was among the first northern artists to travel to Rome to make copies after antique sculpture and introduce historical and mythological subjects with erotic nude figures into the mainstream of northern painting. Most often credited with successfully assimilating Italian Renaissance style into northern European art of the early sixteenth century, he is the pivotal Old Master who changed the course of Flemish art from the Medieval craft tradition of its founder, Jan van Eyck (ca. 1380/90--1441), and charted new territory that eventually led to the great age of Peter Paul Rubens (1577--1640). Correction: Karen Thomas, Associate Conservator, Department of Paintings Conservation Producer and Director: Christopher Noey Editor: Kate Farrell Digital Images and Animation: Paul Caro Camera: Wayne De La Roche, Jessica Glass Sound Recording: David Raymond Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Robin Schwalb

The Road to Van Eyck

The revolution that Jan van Eyck released on painting between 1422 and 1441 did not fall out of the blue. From 1380, artists started looking at the reality surrounding them and tried to incorporate what they saw into their works, interweaving it with traditional religious depictions. In this video, curators Friso Lammertse (Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam) and Stephan Kermperdick (Gemäldegalerie, Berlin), give an introduction to the exhibition 'The Road to Van Eyck'. They discuss the innovations achieved by Jan van Eyck and sketch a picture of the art world during his formative years. The magnificent objects in gold and enamel, leather, wood, alabaster or oil paint on panel which the young Jan van Eyck saw, must have encouraged him to unleash his revolution. This video was made on the occasion of the exhibition 'The Road to Van Eyck', on show in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen from 13 October 2012 to 10 February 2013. Watch more art video's on: www.ARTtube.nl

Jan van Eyck (1390-1441) A collection of paintings 4K Ultra HD

Jan van Eyck (before c. 1390-1441) was an Early Netherlandish painter active in Bruges. He is one of the founders of Early Netherlandish painting and one of the most significant representatives of Early Northern Renaissance art. The few surviving records of his early life indicate that he was born around 1380–1390, most likely in Maaseik. He took employment in the Hague around 1422, when he was already a master painter with workshop assistants, as painter and Valet de chambre with John III the Pitiless, ruler of Holland and Hainaut. He was then employed in Lille as court painter to Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy after John's death in 1425, until he moved to Bruges in 1429 where he lived until his death. He was highly regarded by Philip and undertook a number of diplomatic visits abroad, including to Lisbon in 1428 to explore the possibility of a marriage contract between the duke and Isabella of Portugal. About 20 surviving paintings are confidently attributed to him, as well as the Ghent Altarpiece and the illuminated miniatures of the Turin-Milan Hours, all dated between 1432 and 1439. Ten are dated and signed with a variation of his motto ALS IK KAN (As I (Eyck) can), a pun on his name written in Greek characters. Van Eyck painted both secular and religious subject matter, including altarpieces, single-panel religious figures and commissioned portraits. His work includes single panels, diptychs, triptychs, and polyptych panels. He was well paid by Philip, who sought that the painter was secure financially and had artistic freedom so that he could paint "whenever he pleased". Van Eyck's work comes from the International Gothic style, but he soon eclipsed it, in part through a greater emphasis on naturalism and realism. He achieved a new level of virtuosity through his developments in the use of oil paint. He was highly influential, and his techniques and style were adopted and refined by the Early Netherlandish painters. Little is known of Jan van Eyck's early life and neither the date nor place of his birth is documented. The first extant record of his life comes from the court of John of Bavaria at The Hague where, between 1422 and 1424, payments were made to Meyster Jan den malre (Master Jan the painter) who was then a court painter with the rank of valet de chambre, with at first one and then two assistants. This suggests a date of birth of 1395 at the latest. However, his apparent age in the London probable self-portrait of 1433 suggests to most scholars a date closer to 1380. He was identified in the late 1500s as having been born in Maaseik, then a diocese of Liège. His last name however is related to the place Bergeijk, due to genealogical information related to the coat-of-arms with three millrinds; that information also implies that he stems from the Lords of Rode (Sint-Oedenrode). Elisabeth Dhanens rediscovered in the quarterly state "the fatherly blazon, in gold, three millrinds of lauric acid", similar to other families that descend from the Lords of Rode in the quarter of Peelland in the 'meierij van 's-Hertogenbosch'. His daughter Lievine was in a nunnery in Maaseik after her father's death.The notes on his preparatory drawing for Portrait of Cardinal Niccolò Albergati are written in the Maasland dialect. He had a sister Margareta, and at least two brothers, Hubert with whom he probably served his apprenticeship and Lambert, both also painters, but the order of their births has not been established. Another significant, and rather younger, painter who worked in Southern France, Barthélemy van Eyck, is presumed to be a relation. It is not known where Jan was educated, but he had knowledge of Latin and used the Greek and Hebrew alphabets in his inscriptions, indicating that he was schooled in the classics. This level of education was rare among painters, and would have made him more attractive to the cultivated Philip Jan van Eyck died young, on 9 July 1441, in Bruges. He was buried in the graveyard of the Church of St Donatian. As a mark of respect, Philip made a one-off payment to Jan's widow Margaret, to a value equal to the artist's annual salary. He left behind many unfinished works to be completed by his workshop journeymen. After his death, Lambert van Eyck ran the workshop, as Jan's reputation and stature steadily grew. Early in 1442 Lambert had the body exhumed and placed inside St. Donatian's Cathedral. In 1449 he was mentioned by the Italian humanist and antiquarian Ciriaco de' Pizzicolli as a painter of note and ability, and was recorded by Bartolomeo Facio in 1456. Giorgio Vasari, erroneously, credited him with the invention of oil painting in 1550. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_van_Eyck Thank you, please subscribe for future videos https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0gMk3w9hw8BbtqoUpEMKeg?sub_confirmation=1

Layer by Layer

A medieval artist built up his panel painting in various layers. This video shows the process step by step. Starting point is a detail from the Norfolk Triptych (1414-1420) from the collection of Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, which is on show in the exhibition The road to Van Eyck (October 13, 2012 till February 10, 2013). By combining research into the paint layers with material-technical data such as x-ray and infrared photography, we have been able to make an accurate reconstruction of this detail. The reconstruction was made by art historian and painting restorer Charlotte Caspers. Reconstruction: Charlotte Caspers Camera and editing: Wouter Schreuder Subtitles: Einion

The Three Mary's at the Tomb surfaced around 1850 in Antwerp. Immediately it was attributed to Jan van Eyck. But at the major exhibition of Flemish primitives that was held in Bruges in 1902, it was presented as the only surviving painting by Hubert van Eyck, Jan's mysterious elder brother. Since the Second World War, there has been doubt: Jan? Hubert? Or perhaps some other painter?

In the run-up to the major exhibition The Road to Van Eyck in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, The Three Mary's at the Tomb was examined once more and restored by Annetje Boersma and Eva van Zuien. This video shows the restoration process and the findings of the restorers about the composition of the paint and the working method of the painter. In addition, curator Friso Lammertse sets out on an investigation; he visits three locations that have played an important role in the history of the painting: Vierhouten, Richmond and Bruges. He is confronted with some unexpected surprises.

Also see the ARTtube video Everything is strange about this painting, about the restoration of The Three Mary's at the Tomb: www.ARTtube.nl

This video was made on the occasion of the exhibition The Road to Van Eyck, on show in Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen from October 13, 2012 to February 10, 2013.

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