AWOLNATION - Sail Parody - ASHELLNATION - Snail Petody

author The Pet Collective   6 год. назад
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DIY Unusual Home for a Giant Snail

DIY Unusual Home for a Giant Snail In this video I show you how to make amazing and very unusual home for a giant snail or any pet! As material I chose acrulic glass 2 mm thickness. You need 9 parts. All needed measurments are shown in the video. Decoration is up to you, use your imagination :) As result you will get unique and 100% unusual terrarium. If you like this video don't forget to subscribe :)

WARNING: You will POOP YOUR PANTS from LAUGHING TOO HARD - FUNNY CATS compilation

Only the best and the funniest cat videos! These cats will make you laugh so hard that you will fall out of your chair laughing! The ultimate super hard try not to laugh challenge! Just look how all these dogs, puppies, cats, kittens, parrots, horses, goats,... behave, play, fail, make funny sounds, react to different things,... So ridiculous, funny and cute! What is your favorite clip? :) Hope you like our compilation, please share it and SUBSCRIBE! Watch also our other videos! The content in this compilation is licensed and used with authorization of the rights holder. If you have any questions about compilation or clip licensing, please contact us: tigerlicensing@gmail.com WANT TO SEE YOUR PET IN OUR COMPILATIONS? Send your clips or links to: tigerlicensing@gmail.com For more funny videos & pictures visit and like our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/tigerstudiosfun MUSIC: "Monkeys Spinning Monkeys" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ --- #pet #animal #cat #funny #compilation #laugh # challenge #fun #fail #hilarious #cute

Baby Reptiles 🔴 Cute and Funny Reptile Videos Compilation (2018) Reptiles Video Recopilación

Baby Reptiles - Cute and Funny Reptile Videos Compilation (2018) Reptiles Adorables Video Recopilación | Animal Planet Videos 🦄 Subscribe Here: https://goo.gl/qor4XN 🎃 Get the new LED Purge Mask for Halloween!! 10% Off Promo Code: ANIMAL10 https://www.ledpurgemask.com/products/led-purge-mask 💥 2nd Channel Here: https://goo.gl/SCE4Z9 Baby reptiles are cute and funny. Baby reptiles are awesome. Check out these cute baby reptiles and funny baby reptiles in this cute and funny baby reptiles videos compilation. Los reptiles bebes son lindos y adorables. Los reptiles bebes son increíbles. Vea esta divertida recopilación graciosa de vídeos de reptiles bebes. 🦄 VIDEO PLAYLISTS 🦄 😻 CATS ➞ https://goo.gl/Fn5hjw 🐶 DOGS ➞ https://goo.gl/Ytjqj2 🦉 OWLS ➞ https://goo.gl/hdMX44 🐼 PANDAS ➞ https://goo.gl/VvSvW7 🐔 ANIMALS ➞ https://goo.gl/UzfEuX 🐢 TURTLES ➞ https://goo.gl/ZZeD4W 🐦 PARROTS ➞ https://goo.gl/8P8m9v 🐷 MINI PIGS ➞ https://goo.gl/HooE6u 🦎 REPTILES ➞ https://goo.gl/B1mNe9 🐒 MONKEYS ➞ https://goo.gl/ysT6w5 🦔 HEDGEHOG ➞ https://goo.gl/AM4JvA 🐺 RACCOONS ➞ https://goo.gl/39tNed 🐳 OCEAN LIFE ➞ https://goo.gl/q8izcp 🐹 GUINEA PIGS ➞ https://goo.gl/rtVDkv 🐣 BABY ANIMALS ➞ https://goo.gl/At6vs2 🐯 WILD ANIMALS ➞ https://goo.gl/25ZbvD 🐍 NATURE IS AWESOME ➞ https://goo.gl/ViLfFF 🐇 ANIMALS DOING THINGS ➞ https://goo.gl/ea14Rn Reptiles are tetrapod animals in the class Reptilia, comprising today's turtles, crocodilians, snakes, amphisbaenians, lizards, tuatara, and their extinct relatives. The study of these traditional reptile orders, historically combined with that of modern amphibians, is called herpetology. Because some reptiles are more closely related to birds than they are to other reptiles (e.g., crocodiles are more closely related to birds than they are to lizards), the traditional groups of "reptiles" listed above do not together constitute a monophyletic grouping (or clade). For this reason, many modern scientists prefer to consider the birds part of Reptilia as well, thereby making Reptilia a monophyletic class. The earliest known proto-reptiles originated around 312 million years ago during the Carboniferous period, having evolved from advanced reptiliomorph tetrapods that became increasingly adapted to life on dry land. Some early examples include the lizard-like Hylonomus and Casineria. In addition to the living reptiles, there are many diverse groups that are now extinct, in some cases due to mass extinction events. In particular, the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event wiped out the pterosaurs, plesiosaurs, ornithischians, and sauropods, as well as many species of theropods, including troodontids, dromaeosaurids, tyrannosaurids, and abelisaurids, along with many Crocodyliformes, and squamates (e.g. mosasaurids). Modern non-avian reptiles inhabit every continent with the exception of Antarctica. (If birds are classed as reptiles, then all continents are inhabited.) Several living subgroups are recognized: Testudines (turtles and tortoises), approximately 400 species; Rhynchocephalia (tuatara from New Zealand), 1 species; Squamata (lizards, snakes, and worm lizards), over 9,600 species; Crocodilia (crocodiles, gavials, caimans, and alligators), 25 species; and Aves (birds), 10,000 species. Reptiles are tetrapod vertebrates, creatures that either have four limbs or, like snakes, are descended from four-limbed ancestors. Unlike amphibians, reptiles do not have an aquatic larval stage. Most reptiles are oviparous, although several species of squamates are viviparous, as were some extinct aquatic clades— the fetus develops within the mother, contained in a placenta rather than an eggshell. As amniotes, reptile eggs are surrounded by membranes for protection and transport, which adapt them to reproduction on dry land. Many of the viviparous species feed their fetuses through various forms of placenta analogous to those of mammals, with some providing initial care for their hatchlings. Extant reptiles range in size from a tiny gecko, Sphaerodactylus ariasae, which can grow up to 17 mm (0.7 in) to the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus, which may reach 6 m (19.7 ft) in length and weigh over 1,000 kg (2,200 lb).

Watch These Cunning Snails Stab and Swallow Fish Whole | Deep Look

Join Deep Look on Patreon NOW! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Cone Snails have an arsenal of tools and weapons under their pretty shells. These reef-dwelling hunters nab their prey in microseconds, then slowly eat them alive. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. New research shows that cone snails — ocean-dwelling mollusks known for their brightly colored shells — attack their prey faster than almost any member of the animal kingdom. There are hundreds of species of these normally slow-moving hunters found in oceans across the world. They take down fish, worms and other snails using a hollow, harpoon-like tooth that acts like a spear and a hypodermic needle. When they impale their prey, cone snails inject a chemical cocktail that subdues their meal and gives them time to dine at their leisure. Cone snails launch their harpoons so quickly that scientists were previously unable to capture the movement on camera, making it impossible to calculate just how speedy these snails are. Now, using super-high-speed video, researchers have filmed the full flight of the harpoon for the first time. From start to finish, the harpoon’s flight takes less than 200 micro-seconds. That’s one five-thousandth of a second. It launches with an acceleration equivalent to a bullet fired from a pistol. So how do these sedentary snails pull off such a high-octane feat? Hydrostatic pressure — the pressure from fluid — builds within the half of the snail’s proboscis closest to its body, locked behind a tight o-ring of muscle. When it comes time to strike, the muscle relaxes, and the venom-laced fluid punches into the harpoon’s bulbous base. This pressure launches the harpoon out into the snail’s unsuspecting prey. As fast as the harpoon launches, it comes to an even more abrupt stop. The base of the harpoon gets caught at the end of the proboscis so the snail can reel in its meal. The high-speed action doesn’t stop with the harpoon. Cone snail venom acts fast, subduing fish in as little as a few seconds. The venom is filled with unique molecules, broadly referred to as conotoxins. The composition of cone snail venom varies from species to species, and even between individuals of the same species, creating a library of potential new drugs that researchers are eager to mine. In combination, these chemicals work together to rapidly paralyze a cone snail’s prey. Individually, some molecules from cone snail venom can provide non-opioid pain relief, and could potentially treat Parkinson’s disease or cancer. --- Where do cone snails live? There are 500 species of cone snails living in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, the Caribbean and Red Seas, and the Florida coast. --- Can cone snails kill humans? Most of them do not. Only eight of those 500 species, including the geography cone, have been known to kill humans. --- Why are scientists interested in cone snails? Cone snail venom is derived from thousands of small molecules call peptides that the snail makes under its shell. These peptides produce different effects on cells, which scientists hope to manipulate in the treatment of various diseases. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://wp.me/p6iq8L-84uC ---+ For more information: Here’s what WebMD says about treating a cone snail sting: https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/cone-snail-sting ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: This Mushroom Starts Killing You Before You Even Realize It https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bl9aCH2QaQY Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning https://youtu.be/O-0SFWPLaII ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Space Time: Quantum Mechanics Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IfmgyXs7z8&list=PLsPUh22kYmNCGaVGuGfKfJl-6RdHiCjo1 Above The Noise: Endangered Species: Worth Saving from Extinction? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5eTqjzQZDY ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the Templeton Religion Trust and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED. #deeplook

No snails were harmed in the making of this video. Blame it on my mucus trail.
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See the official video here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPtSKimbjOU

***Snail Lyrics***

Snail!

This is how I wear my shell
I'm climbing up a garden pail
I blame it on my mucus trail, baby!

This is how a land snail moves
Blame it on my sluggish 'tude
Blame it on my mucus trail, baby!

Snail! Snail! Snail! Snail! Snail!

Maybe I'll go eat these leaves
Maybe I'll go climb a tree
Blame it on my mucus tail, baby!

BRIDGE
Snail with me into a park
Snail!
Snail with me into a park
Snail!

Directed Written Produced and Edited By:
The Olde Money Boyz http://oldemoneyboyz.com/
Stephen Cedars
Benji Kleiman
Scott Yacyshyn

Vocals by Ben Stumpf
Supervising Producer - Nicholas Fabiano
Composer - Antonio Pontarelli

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