Rare Giant Snail Feasts On Earthworm | Wild New Zealand | BBC Earth

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Snake Kills Rodent Which Fascinates Baby Capuchin | Wild Brazil | BBC Earth

A family of Capuchin monkeys are scared of an approaching snake, but they need not worry this time, they both want to hunt rodents! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSub Taken From Wild Brazil: Land Of Fire and Flood WATCH MORE: New on Earth: https://bit.ly/2M3La96 Oceanscapes: https://bit.ly/2Hmd2kZ Wild Thailand: https://bit.ly/2kR7lmh Welcome to BBC EARTH! The world is an amazing place full of stories, beauty and natural wonder. Here you'll find 50 years worth of astounding, entertaining, thought-provoking and educational natural history content. Dramatic, rare, and exclusive, nature doesn't get more exciting than this. Want to share your views with the team behind BBC Earth and win prizes? Join our fan panel: http://tinyurl.com/YouTube-BBCEarth-FanPanel This is a channel from BBC Worldwide who help fund new BBC programmes Service information and feedback: http://bbcworldwide.com/vod-feedback--contact-details.aspx

This Terrifying Worm Snatches Fish from the Ocean Floor

Sand strikers, also known as bobbit worms, are primitive-looking creatures that lack eyes, or even a brain. Despite this, they are savage predators who shoot out grapple-like hooks to reel in passing fish. From: CRAZY MONSTERS: Diggers http://bit.ly/2io63f4

Watch These Cunning Snails Stab and Swallow Fish Whole | Deep Look

Join Deep Look on Patreon NOW! https://www.patreon.com/deeplook Cone Snails have an arsenal of tools and weapons under their pretty shells. These reef-dwelling hunters nab their prey in microseconds, then slowly eat them alive. SUBSCRIBE to Deep Look! http://goo.gl/8NwXqt DEEP LOOK is a ultra-HD (4K) short video series created by KQED San Francisco and presented by PBS Digital Studios. See the unseen at the very edge of our visible world. Explore big scientific mysteries by going incredibly small. New research shows that cone snails — ocean-dwelling mollusks known for their brightly colored shells — attack their prey faster than almost any member of the animal kingdom. There are hundreds of species of these normally slow-moving hunters found in oceans across the world. They take down fish, worms and other snails using a hollow, harpoon-like tooth that acts like a spear and a hypodermic needle. When they impale their prey, cone snails inject a chemical cocktail that subdues their meal and gives them time to dine at their leisure. Cone snails launch their harpoons so quickly that scientists were previously unable to capture the movement on camera, making it impossible to calculate just how speedy these snails are. Now, using super-high-speed video, researchers have filmed the full flight of the harpoon for the first time. From start to finish, the harpoon’s flight takes less than 200 micro-seconds. That’s one five-thousandth of a second. It launches with an acceleration equivalent to a bullet fired from a pistol. So how do these sedentary snails pull off such a high-octane feat? Hydrostatic pressure — the pressure from fluid — builds within the half of the snail’s proboscis closest to its body, locked behind a tight o-ring of muscle. When it comes time to strike, the muscle relaxes, and the venom-laced fluid punches into the harpoon’s bulbous base. This pressure launches the harpoon out into the snail’s unsuspecting prey. As fast as the harpoon launches, it comes to an even more abrupt stop. The base of the harpoon gets caught at the end of the proboscis so the snail can reel in its meal. The high-speed action doesn’t stop with the harpoon. Cone snail venom acts fast, subduing fish in as little as a few seconds. The venom is filled with unique molecules, broadly referred to as conotoxins. The composition of cone snail venom varies from species to species, and even between individuals of the same species, creating a library of potential new drugs that researchers are eager to mine. In combination, these chemicals work together to rapidly paralyze a cone snail’s prey. Individually, some molecules from cone snail venom can provide non-opioid pain relief, and could potentially treat Parkinson’s disease or cancer. --- Where do cone snails live? There are 500 species of cone snails living in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, the Caribbean and Red Seas, and the Florida coast. --- Can cone snails kill humans? Most of them do not. Only eight of those 500 species, including the geography cone, have been known to kill humans. --- Why are scientists interested in cone snails? Cone snail venom is derived from thousands of small molecules call peptides that the snail makes under its shell. These peptides produce different effects on cells, which scientists hope to manipulate in the treatment of various diseases. ---+ Read the entire article on KQED Science: https://wp.me/p6iq8L-84uC ---+ For more information: Here’s what WebMD says about treating a cone snail sting: https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/cone-snail-sting ---+ More Great Deep Look episodes: This Mushroom Starts Killing You Before You Even Realize It https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bl9aCH2QaQY Take Two Leeches and Call Me in the Morning https://youtu.be/O-0SFWPLaII ---+ See some great videos and documentaries from the PBS Digital Studios! Space Time: Quantum Mechanics Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IfmgyXs7z8&list=PLsPUh22kYmNCGaVGuGfKfJl-6RdHiCjo1 Above The Noise: Endangered Species: Worth Saving from Extinction? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5eTqjzQZDY ---+ Follow KQED Science: KQED Science: http://www.kqed.org/science Tumblr: http://kqedscience.tumblr.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/kqedscience ---+ About KQED KQED, an NPR and PBS affiliate in San Francisco, CA, serves Northern California and beyond with a public-supported alternative to commercial TV, Radio and web media. Funding for Deep Look is provided in part by PBS Digital Studios. Deep Look is a project of KQED Science, which is supported by the Templeton Religion Trust and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, the Dirk and Charlene Kabcenell Foundation, the Vadasz Family Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Fuhs Family Foundation Fund and the members of KQED. #deeplook

Tusked Weta Vs Foraging Pig | Wild New Zealand | BBC Earth

The Tusked Weta is New Zealand's equivalent of a Mouse and a worthy snack for a Foraging Pig. This Weta however is an escape artist and when necessary can take quite extreme action to evade capture. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/BBCEarthSub Taken From Wild New Zealand WATCH MORE: New on Earth: https://bit.ly/2M3La96 Oceanscapes: https://bit.ly/2Hmd2kZ Wild Thailand: https://bit.ly/2kR7lmh Welcome to BBC EARTH! The world is an amazing place full of stories, beauty and natural wonder. Here you'll find 50 years worth of astounding, entertaining, thought-provoking and educational natural history content. Dramatic, rare, and exclusive, nature doesn't get more exciting than this. Want to share your views? Join our fan panel: http://tinyurl.com/YouTube-BBCEarth-FanPanel This is a channel from BBC Studios who help fund new BBC programmes. Service information and feedback: http://bbcworldwide.com/vod-feedback--contact-details.aspx

Animals Who Are Evil GENIUSES!

Who are some of the animals who are evil geniuses out there?! Did you guys know about dolphins messing with puffer fish essentially so they can get high off of their toxins?! Or what about assassin bugs who are essentially ninjas?! Find out all about some of the most devious animals out there in this video! Follow me on Instagram HERE: https://instagram.com/_pablitos_way/ Subscribe to Pablito’s Way! http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk2zuJeRutyMZSdoh0sltLA?sub_confirmation=1 New videos Monday through Friday! New to Pablito's Way? Start here! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC9umoxByMRJQoW_PzGK-n84iLQgbQyN2 Watch some of my favorite vids below….. Most Insane Mayweather Moments! https://youtu.be/bLko6Lcjib4 WEIRDEST Things Ever Found in Animals! https://youtu.be/2TH1Xbt8l-c 9 of the WORST diseases EVER! https://youtu.be/01M-uJccOBs The Hottest Female Athletes! https://youtu.be/S4p1_MQrKK4 11 Most Ridiculous Purchases by Floyd "Money" Mayweather! https://youtu.be/gjskIvCrG2Y Here are animals who are basically evil geniuses! 12 - Male Cuttlefish These days if you’re single, meeting a potential partner is easier than ever before. There’s Tinder, Bumble, OkCupid, and there’s even Bumble Bff, where you can find people just to hang out! No more of the old fashion way of just meeting people through your friends or people who just happen to be around you. Essentially, be thankful you’re not a male Cuttlefish. Granted,you’d have pretty cool camouflaging skills if you were, but check out what some of the guys have to do in order to find a partner! Some male cuttlefish are too small to fight for a mate, so they have to have a sneaky plan if they wanna get the ladies. In order to fool their fellow larger males, male Cuttlefish will disguise half of his body to look like a female to the male cuttlefish, while he’ll keep on displaying his male patterns to the female cuttlefish! The larger male therefore thinks he’s in luck with two females! As long as the smaller male avoids being grabbed in the typical cuttlefish mating embrace, the smaller camouflaged male cuttlefish is safe. Meanwhile, the actual female, who isn’t too picky, mates with the smaller, sneaky male right in front of the large male! The eggs she now lays will contain a mixture of sperm from both fathers, giving her eggs the best possible chance of success! How do you guys feel about this mating strategy?! What would you guys do if you found out some lady you hit on weren’t actually female?! Let us know in the comment section! And oh yeah, do us a big favor and hit the like button, right here! 11 - Pacific Striped Octopus You know that old trick where kids reach around and tap someone on their far shoulder to try and make them look the other way? Well, in the ocean, the Pacific Striped Octopus employs that exact same strategy in order to catch food! Anytime they get hungry for shrimp, these octopus swim right up to them, reach their tentacles around and tap the shrimp on the back. This pretty much freaks the shrimp out, who think there’s some threat right behind them. So they swim to get away….right into the trap of the clever Octopus. Not only is this very sneaky, it’s also an unusual hunting method for an octopus. Whereas other Octopus species tend to just snag their dinner with their long tentacles, the larger, and perhaps less agile Pacific Striped Octopus prefers this sneaky approach. Wanna hear something else that’s weird? Of course you do! When mating, the males keep their mates at tentacles reach to avoid being eaten. Welcome to the weird and wacky world of a Pacific Striped Octopus! 10 - Boxer Crabs Boxer Crabs have teamed up with sea anemones to form one of nature’s most interesting symbiotic relationships. Armed with stinging tentacles that can wreak some serious havoc, the sea anemones provide a useful weapon to the boxer crabs. The crabs literally use the aneomes as weapons to fend off predators. While it may look like the crabs are just waving around colorful pom poms, it’s actually a very effective survival tactic. And for their efforts, the anemones get fed…...for free. The boxer crabs, grateful for the services provided by the anemones, help them collect food. So it’s a classic case of “if you let me use you as a deadly weapon, I’ll help you use your tentacles to collect and eat food.” Hey wait a minute, this isn’t evil at all!!! Maybe they’re great friends!

When the air itself becomes saturated and the temperature is just right, rare giants start to emerge. Armed with 6 thousand teeth to shred its prey, the Powelliphanta Snail is a voracious predator with revolting table manners.

Taken From Wild New Zealand

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