Conserving Norman Rockwell's "United Nations"

author Norman Rockwell Museum   10 год. назад
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LaunchPad: Conserving Ancient and Byzantine Art at the Art Institute of Chicago

While the Art Institute of Chicago's ancient and Byzantine collection was off view during the construction of the Mary and Michael Jaharis Galleries of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Art, numerous objects underwent extensive conservation. The following video chronicles the conservation processes used to prepare several ancient and Byzantine artworks for display, including the restoration of a Greek vase, the cleaning of Roman and Byzantine mosaics, the metallurgical analysis of a bronze sculpture, and the laser-cleaning of a marble statue. This video was produced with the generous support of a Long Range Fund grant provided by the Community Associates of the Art Institute of Chicago. It was created for LaunchPad, a program of digital interpretive materials that supplement the viewing of works of art on display in the Art Institute of Chicago's galleries.

Conserving Dürer's Triumphal Arch

Follow the latest stages of the complex conservation process of Albrecht Dürer's Triumphal Arch – one of the largest prints ever produced. Curator Giulia Bartrum and Paper Conservator Caroline Barry talk through some of the steps involved in tackling this unusually large conservation challenge.

Exploring & Conserving Jackson Pollock's "Mural"

An overview of the two-year Getty project dedicated to Jackson Pollock's seminal painting, "Mural" (1943), focusing on the scientific analysis and conservation of the painting. Learn more: http://bit.ly/1cFEncj

Norman Rockwell Documentary

Norman Perceval Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th-century American author, painter and illustrator. His works enjoy a broad popular appeal in the United States for its reflection of American culture. Rockwell is most famous for the cover illustrations of everyday life he created for The Saturday Evening Post magazine over nearly five decades.[1] Among the best-known of Rockwell's works are the Willie Gillis series, Rosie the Riveter, The Problem We All Live With, Saying Grace, and the Four Freedoms series. He also is noted for his 64-year relationship with the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), during which he produced covers for their publication Boys' Life, calendars, and other illustrations. These works include popular images that reflect the Scout Oath and Scout Law such as The Scoutmaster, A Scout is Reverent[2] and A Guiding Hand,[3] among many others. Norman Rockwell was a prolific artist, producing more than 4,000 original works in his lifetime. Most of his works are either in public collections, or have been destroyed in fire or other misfortunes. Rockwell also was commissioned to illustrate more than 40 books, including Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn as well as painting the portraits for Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon, as well as those of foreign figures, including Gamal Abdel Nasser and Jawaharlal Nehru. His portrait subjects included Judy Garland. One of his last portraits was of Colonel Sanders in 1973. His annual contributions for the Boy Scouts calendars between 1925 and 1976 (Rockwell was a 1939 recipient of the Silver Buffalo Award, the highest adult award given by the Boy Scouts of America[4]), were only slightly overshadowed by his most popular of calendar works: the "Four Seasons" illustrations for Brown & Bigelow that were published for 17 years beginning in 1947 and reproduced in various styles and sizes since 1964. He painted six images for Coca-Cola advertising.[5] Illustrations for booklets, catalogs, posters (particularly movie promotions), sheet music, stamps, playing cards, and murals (including "Yankee Doodle Dandy" and "God Bless the Hills", which was completed in 1936 for the Nassau Inn in Princeton, New Jersey) rounded out Rockwell's œuvre as an illustrator. Rockwell's work was dismissed by serious art critics in his lifetime.[6] Many of his works appear overly sweet in the opinion of modern critics,[7] especially the Saturday Evening Post covers, which tend toward idealistic or sentimentalized portrayals of American life. This has led to the often-deprecatory adjective, "Rockwellesque". Consequently, Rockwell is not considered a "serious painter" by some contemporary artists, who regard his work as bourgeois and kitsch. Writer Vladimir Nabokov sneered that Rockwell's brilliant technique was put to "banal" use, and wrote in his book Pnin: "That Dalí is really Norman Rockwell's twin brother kidnapped by Gypsies in babyhood". He is called an "illustrator" instead of an artist by some critics, a designation he did not mind, as that was what he called himself.[8] In his later years, however, Rockwell began receiving more attention as a painter when he chose more serious subjects such as the series on racism for Look magazine.[9] One example of this more serious work is The Problem We All Live With, which dealt with the issue of school racial integration. The painting depicts a young black girl, Ruby Bridges, flanked by white federal marshals, walking to school past a wall defaced by racist graffiti.[10] This painting was displayed in the White House when Bridges met with President Obama in 201

Jan Gossart - Conservation Discoveries

Learn more about the exhibition Man, Myth, and Sensual Pleasures: Jan Gossart's Renaissance on view at the Met October 6, 2010--January 17, 2011: http://tinyurl.com/JanGossart The first major exhibition in forty-five years devoted to the Burgundian Netherlandish artist Jan Gossart (ca. 1478-1532) will bring together Gossart's paintings, drawings, and prints and place them in the context of the art and artists that influenced his transformation from Late Gothic Mannerism to the new Renaissance mode. Gossart was among the first northern artists to travel to Rome to make copies after antique sculpture and introduce historical and mythological subjects with erotic nude figures into the mainstream of northern painting. Most often credited with successfully assimilating Italian Renaissance style into northern European art of the early sixteenth century, he is the pivotal Old Master who changed the course of Flemish art from the Medieval craft tradition of its founder, Jan van Eyck (ca. 1380/90--1441), and charted new territory that eventually led to the great age of Peter Paul Rubens (1577--1640). Correction: Karen Thomas, Associate Conservator, Department of Paintings Conservation Producer and Director: Christopher Noey Editor: Kate Farrell Digital Images and Animation: Paul Caro Camera: Wayne De La Roche, Jessica Glass Sound Recording: David Raymond Production Assistants: Sarah Cowan, Robin Schwalb

Video for Norman Rockwell Museum's new exhibition "Conserving Norman Rockwell's 'United Nations.'" Leslie Paisley, Conservator of Paper Department Head at Williamstown Art Conservation Center, takes viewers through the process of treating a fragile work on paper through such means as aqueous water technique-- don't try this at home!

Video produced by Jeremy Clowe. ©2009 Norman Rockwell Museum. All rights reserved.

"Conserving Norman Rockwells 'United Nations'"
Norman Rockwell Museum
Opens May 2, 2009

This intimate exhibition will explore the intricacies of art conservation, from initial evaluation to complete restoration. A step-by-step investigation to the Williamstown Art Conservation Centers methods of conserving Norman Rockwells large-scale symbolic portrayal of the United Nations and the peoples of the world will offer insights into a rarely seen but essential preservation process.

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